Hobitit

Last updated
Hobitit
Hobitit.jpg
Genre Miniseries
Written by Timo Torikka
Directed by Timo Torikka
Starring
Composer(s)Toni Edelmann
Country of originFinland
Original language(s) Finnish
No. of episodes9
Production
Producer(s)Olof Qvickström
Production location(s)Ryhmäteatteri theatre, Yle
Running time30 minutes
Production company(s) Yle
Ryhmateatteri
Distributor Yle (Finland & World-Wide)
Release
Original network Yle TV1
Original release29 March (1993-03-29) 
24 May 1993 (1993-05-24)

Hobitit (The Hobbits) is a nine-part Finnish live action fantasy television miniseries originally broadcast in 1993 on Yle TV1. Directed by Timo Torikka and produced by Olof Qvickström, it is based on The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, but limits itself to the journey of the hobbits Frodo and Sam, carrying the One Ring to Mount Doom. Their adventures are narrated by Sam many years later to an audience of young hobbits. Except for a flashback to Bilbo's encounter with Gollum, no material from Tolkien's 1937 novel The Hobbit is used.

Contents

The series was written and directed by Timo Torikka. Toni Edelmann composed the soundtrack. [1] Hobitit featured nine episodes of 30 minutes runtime that were aired from 29 March to 24 May 1993. Filming locations included the Ryhmäteatteri theatre in Helsinki and Yle's studio production facilities. Landscapes were added using chroma key compositing.

Cast

The show's cast included the following actors and roles: [2]

Episodes

Related Research Articles

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Frodo Baggins is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's writings, and one of the protagonists in The Lord of the Rings. Frodo is a hobbit of the Shire who inherits the One Ring from his cousin Bilbo Baggins and undertakes the quest to destroy it in the fires of Mount Doom in Mordor. He is mentioned in Tolkien's posthumously published works, The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales.

One Ring Magical ring that must be destroyed in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings

The One Ring is a central plot element in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings (1954–55). It first appeared in the earlier story The Hobbit (1937) as a magic ring that grants the wearer invisibility. Tolkien changed it into a malevolent Ring of Power and re-wrote parts of The Hobbit to fit in with the expanded narrative. The Lord of the Rings describes the hobbit Frodo Baggins's quest to destroy the Ring.

References

  1. "Yle teettää oman sovituksen Taru sormusten herrasta-sadusta" [Yle to produce its own version of the tale of The Lord of the Rings]. Helsingin Sanomat (in Finnish). 18 June 1991.
  2. "Hobitit". Video Detective. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Kajava, Jukka (29 March 1993). "Tolkienin taruista on tehty tv-sarja: Hobitien ilme syntyi jo Ryhmäteatterin Suomenlinnan tulkinnassa" [Tolkien's tales have been turned into a TV series: The Hobbits have been brought to live in the Ryhmäteatteri theatre]. Helsingin Sanomat (in Finnish).(subscription required)
  4. 1 2 Robb, Brian J.; Simpson, Paul (2013). Middle-earth Envisioned: The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings: On Screen, On Stage, and Beyond. Race Point Publishing. p. 66. ISBN   978-1-937994-27-3.
  5. Mansikka, Ossi. "Tiesitkö, että ysärillä tehtiin suomalainen tv-sarja Sormusten herrasta, ja tätä kulttuurin merkkipaalua on nyt mahdotonta enää nähdä" (in Finnish). Nyt.fi. Retrieved 24 March 2020. Kirjafaneja riemastuttanee tieto, että Torikan versiossa nähdään myös Jacksonin hylkäämä Tom Bombadil Esko Hukkanen esittämänä.