Loyal Griggs

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Loyal Allen Griggs
We're No Angels (1955) 1.jpg
On set of We're No Angels , Gloria Talbott and Loyal Griggs
BornAugust 15, 1906
DiedMay 6, 1978(1978-05-06) (aged 71)
Occupation Cinematographer

Loyal Griggs, A.S.C. (August 15, 1906 May 6, 1978), was an American cinematographer.

Contents

Griggs joined the staff of Paramount Pictures in 1924 after graduating from school and initially worked at the studio's process department. He was promoted from assistant photographer to second unit photographer to camera process photographer, before becoming director of photography for three 1951 releases: Crosswinds , Passage West and The Last Outpost .

Griggs won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for the 1953 Western Shane . [1] He was part of the production team that received an Academy Honorary Award at the 11th Academy Awards for their efforts on the Paramount film Spawn of the North . [2]

Griggs' other Paramount films as cinematographer included the 1954 musical White Christmas , the 1956 Cecil B. DeMille epic The Ten Commandments , and the Jerry Lewis comedies The Sad Sack (1957) and Visit to a Small Planet (1960). He was also the cinematographer on George Stevens' 1965 United Artists release The Greatest Story Ever Told as well as Otto Preminger's World War II drama of that same year, In Harm's Way . His final film was the 1971 American International Pictures comedy Bunny O'Hare starring Bette Davis and Ernest Borgnine. [3]

Selected filmography

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References

  1. Variety profile [ permanent dead link ]
  2. "Special Award - 11th Academy Awards". Academy Awards Database. Retrieved 9 August 2015.[ permanent dead link ]
  3. New York Times /AllMovie Guide profile