Maltese Braille

Last updated
Maltese Braille
Type
Alphabet
Languages Maltese
Parent systems
Braille
Print basis
Maltese alphabet

Maltese Braille is the braille alphabet of the Maltese language. It was in the news in 2005 with the publication of the first braille Bible in Maltese. [1]

Braille Tactile writing system for blind and visually impaired people

Braille is a tactile writing system used by people who are visually impaired. It is traditionally written with embossed paper. Braille users can read computer screens and other electronic supports using refreshable braille displays. They can write braille with the original slate and stylus or type it on a braille writer, such as a portable braille notetaker or computer that prints with a braille embosser.

Maltese language Semitic language

Maltese is the national language of Malta and a co-official language of the country alongside English, while also serving as an official language of the European Union, the only Semitic language so distinguished. Maltese is descended from Siculo-Arabic, the extinct variety of Arabic that developed in Sicily and was later introduced to Malta, between the end of the ninth century and the end of the twelfth century.

Chart

The alphabet is as follows. (See Maltese alphabet.) Ż has the form of international y. [2] [ better source needed ]

The Maltese alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet with the addition of some letters with diacritic marks and digraphs. It is used to write the Maltese language, which evolved from the otherwise extinct Siculo-Arabic dialect, as a result of 800 years independent development. It contains 30 letters: 24 consonants and 6 vowels.

Braille NULL.svg
 
Braille A1.svg
a
Braille B2.svg
b
Braille C3.svg
ċ
Braille D4.svg
d
Braille E5.svg
e
Braille F6.svg
f
Braille U.svg
ġ
Braille G7.svg
g
Braille E.svg
Braille H8.svg
h
Braille E.svg
ħ
Braille I9.svg
i
Braille J0.svg
j
Braille K.svg
k
Braille L.svg
l
Braille M.svg
m
Braille N.svg
n
Braille O.svg
o
Braille P.svg
p
Braille Q.svg
q
Braille R.svg
r
Braille S.svg
s
Braille T.svg
t
Braille U.svg
u
Braille V.svg
v
Braille W.svg
w
Braille X.svg
x
Braille Z.svg
z
Braille Y.svg
ż

UNESCO (2013) shows very different, and supposedly confirmed, letter assignments: [3]

ċ, ġ, ħ, j, x, ż [sic], z.

This appears to be an old proposal that was never implemented, one which followed the sounds of the letters of the print alphabet rather than the letters themselves.

Related Research Articles

Mainland Chinese Braille braille script used for Standard Mandarin in mainland China (but not in Taiwan)

(Mainland) Chinese Braille is a braille script used for Standard Mandarin in China. Consonants and basic finals conform to international braille, but additional finals form a semi-syllabary, as in zhuyin (bopomofo). Each syllable is written with up to three Braille cells, representing the initial, final, and tone, respectively. In practice tone is generally omitted as it is in pinyin.

Vietnamese Braille is the braille alphabet used for the Vietnamese language. It is very close to French Braille, but with the addition of tone letters. Vietnamese Braille is known in Vietnamese as chữ nổi, literally "raised letters", while electronic braille displays are called màn hình chữ nổi.

Hebrew Braille

Hebrew Braille is the braille alphabet for Hebrew. The International Hebrew Braille Code is widely used. It was devised in the 1930s and completed in 1944. It is based on international norms, with additional letters devised to accommodate differences between English Braille and the Hebrew alphabet. Unlike Hebrew, but in keeping with other braille alphabets, Hebrew Braille is read from left to right instead of right to left., and unlike English Braille, it is a Abjad, all consonants.

Tibetan Braille is the braille alphabet for writing the Tibetan language. It was invented in 1992 by German socialworker Sabriye Tenberken. It is based on German braille, with some extensions from international usage. As in print, the vowel a is not written.

Russian Braille

Russian Braille is the braille alphabet of the Russian language. With suitable extensions, it is used for languages of neighboring countries that are written in Cyrillic in print, such as Ukrainian and Mongolian. It is based on the Latin transliteration of Cyrillic, with additional letters assigned idiosyncratically. In Russian, it is known as Шрифт Брайля Shrift Braylya 'Braille Script'.

Greek Braille is the braille alphabet of the Greek language. It is based on international braille conventions, generally corresponding to Latin transliteration. In Greek, it is known as Κώδικας Μπράιγ Kôdikas Mpraig "Braille Code".

The goal of braille uniformity is to unify the braille alphabets of the world as much as possible, so that literacy in one braille alphabet readily transfers to another. Unification was first achieved by a convention of the International Congress on Work for the Blind in 1878, where it was decided to replace the mutually incompatible national conventions of the time with the French values of the basic Latin alphabet, both for languages which use Latin-based alphabets and, through their Latin equivalents, for languages which use other scripts. However, the unification did not address letters beyond these 26, leaving French and German Braille partially incompatible, and as braille spread to new languages with new needs, national conventions again became disparate. A second round of unification was undertaken under the auspices of UNESCO in 1951, setting the foundation for international braille usage today.

Dutch Braille is the braille alphabet used for the Dutch language in the Netherlands and in Flanders.

Lithuanian Braille is the braille alphabet of the Lithuanian language.

Latvian Braille is the braille alphabet of the Latvian language.

Several braille alphabets are used in Nigeria. For English, Unified English Braille has been adopted. Three other languages have been written in braille: Hausa, Igbo, and Yoruba. All three alphabets are based on English readings, with the addition of letters particular to these languages. Punctuation is as in English Braille.

According to Unesco (2013), there are different braille alphabets for Urdu in India and in Pakistan. The Indian alphabet is based on national Bharati Braille, while the Pakistani alphabet is based on Persian Braille.

Punjabi Braille is the braille alphabet used in India for Punjabi. It is one of the Bharati braille alphabets, and largely conforms to the letter values of the other Bharati alphabets.

Ukrainian Braille is the braille alphabet of the Ukrainian language. It is based on Russian Braille, with a few additional letters found in the print Ukrainian alphabet.

Burmese Braille

Burmese Braille is the braille alphabet of languages of Burma written in the Burmese script, including Burmese and Karen. Letters that may not seem at first glance to correspond to international norms are more recognizable when traditional romanization is considered. For example, သ s is rendered th, which is how it was romanized when Burmese Braille was developed ; similarly စ c and ဇ j as s and z.

Several braille alphabets are used in Ghana. For English, Unified English Braille has been adopted. Four other languages have been written in braille: Akan (Twi), Ga, Ewe, and Dagaare. All three alphabets are based on the basic braille letter values of basic Latin alphabet:

The braille alphabet used for the Kyrgyz language is based on Russian Braille, with a few additional letters found in the print Kyrgyz alphabet.

The braille alphabet used for the Kazakh language is based on Russian Braille, with several additional letters found in the print Kazakh alphabet.

Estonian Braille is the braille alphabet of the Estonian language.

Cambodian or Khmer Braille is the braille alphabet of the Khmer language of Cambodia.

References

  1. Braille Bible in Maltese: 'a dream come true', Times of Malta, 2005 Nov 6
  2. Kummissjoni Nazzjonali Persuni b’Diżabilità (KNPD)
  3. UNESCO (2013) World Braille Usage, 3rd edition.