Thornbury Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania

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Thornbury
Squire Cheyney Farm.JPG
The Squire Cheyney Farm, a historic site in the township
Chester County Pennsylvania incorporated and unincorporated areas Thornbury highlighted.svg
Location in Chester County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
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Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
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Thornbury
Location of Thornbury Township in Pennsylvania
Coordinates: 39°55′50″N75°32′43″W / 39.93056°N 75.54528°W / 39.93056; -75.54528 Coordinates: 39°55′50″N75°32′43″W / 39.93056°N 75.54528°W / 39.93056; -75.54528
CountryUnited States
State Pennsylvania
County Chester
Area
[1]
  Total3.87 sq mi (10.01 km2)
  Land3.83 sq mi (9.93 km2)
  Water0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation
249 ft (76 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total3,017
  Estimate 
(2016) [2]
3,146
  Density820.77/sq mi (316.89/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (EST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
Area code(s) 610
FIPS code 42-029-76568
Website www.thornburytwp.com
A police car of the Westtown-East Goshen Regional Police Department, serving Thornbury, East Goshen, and Westtown townships in Chester County PoliceCarWesttownEastGoshenThornbury.JPG
A police car of the Westtown-East Goshen Regional Police Department, serving Thornbury, East Goshen, and Westtown townships in Chester County

Thornbury Township is a township in Chester County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 3,017 at the 2010 census. It is adjacent to, and was once joined with, Thornbury Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania.

Township (Pennsylvania) township in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania

A Pennsylvania township or township under Pennsylvania laws is one class of the three types of municipalities codified, in Pennsylvania—smaller municipal class legal entities providing local self-government functions in the majority of land areas in the more rural regions. Townships act as the lowest level municipal corporations of governance of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, a U.S. state of the United States of America.

Chester County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Chester County, colloquially known as Chesco, is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 498,886, increasing by 4.1% to a census-estimated 519,293 residents as of 2017. The county seat is West Chester. Chester County was one of the three original Pennsylvania counties created by William Penn in 1682. It was named for Chester, England.

Pennsylvania U.S. state in the United States

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the Northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Contents

History

Thornbury Township was organized in 1687 with the appointment of Hugh Durborrow as constable and received its name from Thornbury, in Gloucestershire, England. At the time, no more than five or six families lived within the limits of the township. George Peirce, one of the earliest and most influential inhabitants of the township, was married to a native of Thornbury, England, and the township was purportedly named to compliment her. Thornbury, Birmingham and Westtown townships are the only townships within the present limits of Chester County which were organized before 1704. [3]

Gloucestershire County of England

Gloucestershire is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean.

Birmingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania Township in Pennsylvania, United States

Birmingham Township is a township in Chester County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 4,208 at the 2010 census.

The township was divided when Delaware County was separated from Chester County in 1798. As a result, there is a Thornbury Township in each county. Landowners were allowed to choose which county they wished to be in, causing the line between the two townships, and the two counties, to be very irregular. [3] [4] [5]

Delaware County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Delaware County, colloquially referred to as Delco, is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. With a population of 562,960, it is the fifth most populous county in Pennsylvania, and the third smallest in area. The county was created on September 26, 1789, from part of Chester County, and named for the Delaware River.

The Battle of Brandywine, part of the American Revolutionary War took place partially in the town. It was one of Thornbury's citizens, Squire Thomas Cheyney, who informed George Washington, commander of the Continental Army, of the approach of the British troops. [6] [7]

Battle of Brandywine Battle of the American Revolutionary War

The Battle of Brandywine, also known as the Battle of Brandywine Creek, was fought between the American Continental Army of General George Washington and the British Army of General Sir William Howe on September 11, 1777, as part of the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The forces met near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, as Howe moved to take Philadelphia, then the American capital. The "Redcoats" of the British Army defeated the American rebels and forced them to withdraw northeast toward of Philadelphia. More troops fought at Brandywine than any other battle of the American Revolution. It was also the longest single-day battle of the war, with continuous fighting for 11 hours.

American Revolutionary War War between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence in 1776 as the United States of America, and then formed a military alliance with France in 1778.

George Washington First President of the United States

George Washington was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. Previously, he led Patriot forces to victory in the nation's War for Independence. He presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 which established the U.S. Constitution and a federal government. Washington has been called the "Father of His Country" for his manifold leadership in the formative days of the new nation.

The Squire Cheyney Farm and William J. Barnard Residence are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [8]

Squire Cheyney Farm United States historic place

Squire Cheyney Farm is a historic farm and national historic district located in Thornbury Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The district encompasses two contributing buildings, three contributing sites, one contributing structure, and contributing object. They are the farmhouse, barn, ruins of a granary, remains of an ice house, a spring house (1799), stone retaining wall, and family cemetery. The house was built in four periods, with the oldest dated to about 1797. The oldest section is a 2 1/s-story, three bay, stuccoed stone structure with a gable roof. The additions were built about 1815, about 1830, and about 1850, making it a seven-bay-wide dwelling. It is "L"-shaped and has a slate gable roof. During the American Revolution, Thomas "Squire" Cheyney [II] informed General George Washington during the Battle of Brandywine that the British were flanking him to the north. He was later appointed to the Pennsylvania Ratifying Convention to ratify the United States Constitution. The site is now a township park known as Squire Cheyney Farm Park.

William J. Barnard Residence United States historic place

The William J. Barnard Residence, also known as Green Shadows and Thornbury Lodge, is a historic home located in Thornbury Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. It was designed in 1900, and the building was completed in 1907. It was designed by W.E. Jackson, a student of Wilson Eyre, a noted Philadelphia architect. It is a two-story, banked stone dwelling faced in rubble "Brandywine Granite." It features a steeply pitched slate gable roof with cross gable. Also on the property is a contributing former stable, later converted to a residence known as Green Echo.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Points of interest

Entries in the National Register of Historic Places

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1930 244
1940 233−4.5%
1950 29727.5%
1960 746151.2%
1970 8037.6%
1980 1,32364.8%
1990 1,131−14.5%
2000 2,678136.8%
2010 3,01712.7%
Est. 20163,146 [2] 4.3%
[15]

At the 2010 census, the township was 85.5% non-Hispanic White, 3.4% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 7.6% Asian, and 1.4% were two or more races. 1.9% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry. [16]

As of the census [17] of 2000, there were 2,678 people, 1,023 households, and 734 families residing in the township. The population density was 684.8 people per square mile (264.4/km²). There were 1,095 housing units at an average density of 280.0/sq mi (108.1/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.90% White, 2.58% African American, 4.56% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.78% of the population.

There were 1,023 households, out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.6% were married couples living together, 4.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.2% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 3.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the township the population was spread out, with 26.0% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 34.8% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $84,225, and the median income for a family was $112,291. Males had a median income of $70,602 versus $42,371 for females. The per capita income for the township was $47,505. None of the families and 1.6% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no people under eighteen, and 2.0% of those over 64.

Education

The West Chester Area School District operates public schools serving the township. [18] Elementary schools serving sections include Penn Wood, Sarah Starkweather, and Westtown-Thornbury. [19] All residents are zoned to Stetson Middle School and West Chester Rustin High School. [20]

Notable people

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References

  1. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 13, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. 1 2 Futhey, J. Smith; Gilbert Cope (1881). History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, with Genealogical and Biographical Sketches. Louis H. Everts. ISBN   0-7884-0206-4.
  4. LL.D. Jordan, John W. (1914). A History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania and its People. New York, NY:Lewis Historical Publishing Company.
  5. History of Thornbury Township, Pa
  6. Wood, W.J.; John S.D. Eisenhower (1990). Battles of the Revolutionary War: 1775-1781. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. ISBN   0-306-80617-7.
  7. "About the Twp". Archived from the original on 2006-05-02. Retrieved 2006-04-30.
  8. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  9. PHMC Cultural Resources Database
  10. GROWTH by BEAUTIFICATION - Cheyney University campus undergoes renovations
  11. Cheyney Timeline Archived 2007-11-18 at the Wayback Machine
  12. Barnard Residence - Philadelphia Architects and Buildings
  13. "Taylor Frazer Ruins". Archived from the original on 2009-01-06. Retrieved 2008-05-20.
  14. POLLY FRAZER An Unsung Heroine’s Story
  15. http://www.dvrpc.org/data/databull/rdb/db82/appedixa.xls
  16. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  17. "West Chester Area Council of Governments Map." On the website of West Goshen Township. Retrieved on September 26, 2018.
  18. "School Boundary Adjustment Draft SK8C - Current Boundaries with Zones of Change" (Elementary). West Chester Area School District. Retrieved on September 26, 2018.
  19. "School Boundary Adjustment Draft SK8C - Current Boundaries with Zones of Change" (Secondary). West Chester Area School District. Retrieved on September 26, 2018.