Radio promotion

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Radio promotion is the division of a record company which is charged with placing songs on the radio. They maintain relationships with program directors at radio stations and attempt to persuade them to play singles to promote the sale of recordings, such as CDs, sold by the record company. Those involved are known as record pluggers. [1] They may also pay a fee to a third party, known as an independent promoter, who has a financial relationship with the radio station or its parent company.

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