Music recording certification

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Boy band Plus One displaying their gold records Gold Record.jpg
Boy band Plus One displaying their gold records

Music recording certification is a system of certifying that a music recording has shipped, sold, or streamed a certain number of units. The threshold quantity varies by type (such as album, single, music video) and by nation or territory (see List of music recording certifications).

Single (music) Type of music release usually containing one or two tracks

In the music industry, a single is a type of release, typically a song recording of fewer tracks than an LP record or an album. This can be released for sale to the public in a variety of different formats. In most cases, a single is a song that is released separately from an album, although it usually also appears on an album. Typically, these are the songs from albums that are released separately for promotional uses such as digital download or commercial radio airplay and are expected to be the most popular. In other cases a recording released as a single may not appear on an album.

A music video is a short film that integrates a song with imagery, and is produced for promotional or artistic purposes. Modern music videos are primarily made and used as a marketing device intended to promote the sale of music recordings. There are also cases where songs are used in tie-in marketing campaigns that allow them to become more than just a song. Tie-ins and merchandising can be used for toys or for food or other products. Although the origins of the music video date back to musical short films that first appeared in the 1920s, they again came into prominence in the 1980s when the channel MTV based their format around the medium. Prior to the 1980s, these kinds of videos were described by various terms including "illustrated song", "filmed insert", "promotional (promo) film", "promotional clip", "promotional video", "song video", "song clip" or "film clip".

Contents

Almost all countries follow variations of the RIAA certification categories, which are named after precious materials (gold, platinum and diamond).

In the United States, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) awards certification based on the number of albums and singles sold through retail and other ancillary markets. Other countries have similar awards. Certification is not automatic; for an award to be made, the record label must request certification. The audit is conducted against net shipments after returns, which includes albums sold directly to retailers and one-stops, direct-to-consumer sales and other outlets.

Gold Chemical element with atomic number 79

Gold is a chemical element with the symbol Au and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium. Less commonly, it occurs in minerals as gold compounds, often with tellurium.

Platinum Chemical element with atomic number 78

Platinum is a chemical element with the symbol Pt and atomic number 78. It is a dense, malleable, ductile, highly unreactive, precious, silverish-white transition metal. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platino, meaning "little silver".

The threshold required for these awards depends upon the population of the territory where the recording is released. Typically, they are awarded only to international releases and are awarded individually for each country where the album is sold. Different sales levels, some perhaps 10 times lower than others, may exist for different music media (for example: videos versus albums, singles, or downloads).

Album collection of recorded music, words, sounds

An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at ​33 13 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format widely used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s.

History

The original gold and silver record awards were presented to artists by their own record companies to publicize their sales achievements. The first silver disc was awarded by Regal Zonophone to George Formby in December 1937 for sales of 100,000 copies of "The Window Cleaner". [1] [2] The first gold disc was awarded by RCA Victor (under division imprint Bluebird Records) to Glenn Miller and His Orchestra in February 1942, celebrating the sale of 1.2 million copies of single "Chattanooga Choo Choo". Another example of a company award is the gold record awarded to Elvis Presley in 1956 for one million units sold of his single "Don't Be Cruel" or Decca’s gold record to Jerry Lewis for "Rock-a-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody." The first gold record for an LP was awarded by RCA Victor to Harry Belafonte in 1957 for the album Calypso (1956), the first album to sell over 1,000,000 copies in RCA's reckoning.

George Formby English actor, singer-songwriter and comedian

George Formby,, was an English actor, singer-songwriter and comedian who became known to a worldwide audience through his films of the 1930s and 1940s. On stage, screen and record he sang light, comical songs, usually playing the ukulele or banjolele, and became the UK's highest-paid entertainer.

Bluebird Records American record label

Bluebird Records was a record label known for its low-cost releases, primarily of blues and jazz in the 1930s and 1940s. It was founded in 1932 as a lower-priced RCA Victor subsidiary label. Bluebird concentrated on producing and selling music inexpensively. It created what came to be known as the "Bluebird sound", which influenced rhythm and blues and early rock and roll.

Chattanooga Choo Choo Glenn Miller Orchestra song

"Chattanooga Choo Choo" is a 1941 song written by Mack Gordon and composed by Harry Warren. It was originally recorded as a big band/swing tune by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra and featured in the 1941 movie Sun Valley Serenade. It was the first song to receive a gold record, presented by RCA Victor in 1942, for sales of 1.2 million copies.

At the industry level, in 1958 the Recording Industry Association of America introduced its gold record award program for records of any kind, albums or singles, which achieved one million dollars in retail sales. These sales were restricted to U.S.-based record companies and did not include exports to other countries. [3] [4] For albums in 1968, this would mean shipping approximately 250,000 units; for singles the number would be higher due to their lower retail price. [4] The platinum certification was introduced in 1976 for the sale of one million units for albums and two million for singles, with the gold certification redefined to mean sales of 500,000 units for albums and one million for singles. [5] No album was certified platinum prior to this year. For instance, the recording by Van Cliburn of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto from 1958 would eventually be awarded a platinum citation, but this would not happen until two decades after its release. In 1999, the diamond certification was introduced for sales of ten million units. In the late 1980s, the certification thresholds for singles were dropped to match that of albums. [5]

Recording Industry Association of America Trade organization representing the recording industry in the U.S.

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is a trade organization that represents the recording industry in the United States. Its members consist of record labels and distributors, which the RIAA says "create, manufacture and/or distribute approximately 85% of all legally sold recorded music in the United States." The RIAA headquarters is in Washington, D.C.

LP record Analog sound storage medium

The LP is an analog sound storage medium, a vinyl record format characterized by a speed of ​33 13 rpm, a 12- or 10-inch diameter, and use of the "microgroove" groove specification. Introduced by Columbia in 1948, it was soon adopted as a new standard by the entire record industry. Apart from a few relatively minor refinements and the important later addition of stereophonic sound, it has remained the standard format for vinyl albums.

Van Cliburn American pianist

Harvey Lavan "Van" Cliburn Jr. was an American pianist who, at the age of 23, achieved worldwide recognition when he won the inaugural International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1958.

RIAA certification

Gold record presented to Artie Schroeck for his arrangement on "Can't Take My Eyes Off You", 1967 Artie's Gold Record.jpg
Gold record presented to Artie Schroeck for his arrangement on "Can't Take My Eyes Off You", 1967

The first official designation of a "gold record" by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) was established for singles in 1958, and the RIAA also trademarked the term "gold record" in the United States. On 14 March 1958, the RIAA certified its first gold record, Perry Como's hit single "Catch a Falling Star". The Oklahoma! soundtrack was certified as the first gold album four months later. In 1976, RIAA introduced the platinum certification, first awarded to the Eagles compilation album Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) on 24 February 1976, [6] and to Johnnie Taylor's single "Disco Lady" on 22 April 1976. [7] [8] As music sales increased with the introduction of compact discs, the RIAA created the Multi-Platinum award in 1984. Diamond awards, honoring those artists whose sales of singles or albums reached 10,000,000 copies, were introduced in 1999. [9]

Trademark Recognizable sign, design or expression which identifies products or services

A trademark is a type of intellectual property consisting of a recognizable sign, design, or expression which identifies products or services of a particular source from those of others, although trademarks used to identify services are usually called service marks. The trademark owner can be an individual, business organization, or any legal entity. A trademark may be located on a package, a label, a voucher, or on the product itself. For the sake of corporate identity, trademarks are often displayed on company buildings. It is legally recognized as a type of intellectual property.

Perry Como American singer, actor, television personality

Pierino Ronald "Perry" Como was an American singer, actor and television personality. During a career spanning more than half a century he recorded exclusively for RCA Victor for 44 years, after signing with the label in 1943. "Mr. C.", as he was nicknamed, sold millions of records and pioneered a weekly musical variety television show. His weekly television shows and seasonal specials were broadcast throughout the world. In the official RCA Records Billboard magazine memorial, his life was summed up in these few words: "50 years of music and a life well lived. An example to all."

"Catch a Falling Star", written by Paul Vance and Lee Pockriss, is a song made famous by Perry Como's hit version, recorded and released in late 1957. It was Como's last #1 hit, reaching #1 on the Billboard "Most Played by Jockeys" chart but not in the overall top 100, where it reached #2. It was the first single to receive a Recording Industry Association of America gold record certification, on March 14, 1958. The song also topped the Australian charts in 1958. The single won Como the 1959 Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance, Male. Its melody is based on a theme from Brahms' Academic Festival Overture. The Como version features the Ray Charles Singers, who sing the refrain as a repeated round.

In the 20th century, and for a part of the first decade of the 21st, it was common for distributors to claim certifications based on their shipments – wholesale to retail outlets – which led to many certifications which outstripped the actual final retail sales figures. This became much less common once the majority of retail sales became paid digital downloads and digital streaming. [10]

Digital media certification

In most countries certifications no longer apply solely to physical media but now also include sales awards recognizing digital downloads (in the U.S. and U.K. since 2004). [11] In June 2006, the RIAA also certified the ringtone downloads of songs. Streaming from on-demand services such as Apple Music, Spotify, Tidal and Napster has been included into existing digital certification in the U.S since 2013 and the U.K. and Germany since 2014. In the U.S. and Germany video streaming services like YouTube, VEVO, and Yahoo! Music also began to be counted towards the certification, in both cases using the formula of 100 streams being equivalent to one download. [12] [13] [14] Other countries, such as Denmark and Spain, maintain separate awards for digital download singles and streaming. [15] [16]

IFPI certification

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) was founded in 1996, and grants the IFPI Platinum Europe Award for album sales over one million within Europe and (as of October 2009) the Middle East. Multi-platinum Europe Awards are presented for sales in subsequent multiples of one million. Eligibility is unaffected by time (from date of release), and is not restricted to European-based artists.

IMPALA certification

The Independent Music Companies Association (IMPALA) was founded in 2000 to grow the independent music sector and promote independent music in the interests of artistic, entrepreneurial and cultural diversity. IMPALA launched sales awards in 2005 as the first sales awards recognising that success on a pan-European basis begins well before sales reach one million. The award levels are Silver (20,000+), Double Silver (40,000+), Gold (75,000+), Double Gold (150,000+), Diamond (200,000+), Platinum (400,000+) and Double Platinum (800,000+).

Certification thresholds

Platinum record awarded to De Dannan by the Irish Recorded Music Association for their 1999 album How the West Was Won. In Ireland, a recording must sell 15,000 units to be certified platinum. Record, Ireland.jpg
Platinum record awarded to De Dannan by the Irish Recorded Music Association for their 1999 album How the West Was Won. In Ireland, a recording must sell 15,000 units to be certified platinum.

Below are certification thresholds for the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and France. The numbers in the tables are in terms of "units", where a unit represents one sale or one shipment of a given medium. Certification is often awarded cumulatively, and it is possible for a single album to be certified silver, gold, and platinum in turn. An album that becomes Platinum twice over, for example, an album which has sold 2,000,000 copies in the United States, is said to be "Double-Platinum", or sometimes "Multi-Platinum". Since 2013 in the U.S., [13] and 2014 in the U.K. [17] and Germany, [18] streaming of songs counts towards certification of singles with 150 streams being the equivalent of 1 unit sold. [17] [19] Since February 2016, RIAA includes on-demand audio and video streams and a track sale equivalent in Gold and Platinum Album Award. The program will count both sales and streams for single and album certifications. [20]

Manufacture of awards

Somali singer Saado Ali Warsame receiving a gold record Lifetime Achievement Award Saadoaliw1.jpg
Somali singer Saado Ali Warsame receiving a gold record Lifetime Achievement Award

The plaques themselves contain various items under the glass. Modern awards often use CDs instead of records. Most gold and platinum records are actually vinyl records which have been vacuum metallized and tinted, while trimmed and plated metal "masters", "mothers", or "stampers" (metal parts used for pressing records out of vinyl) were initially used. The music in the grooves on the record may not match the actual recording being awarded. [26] Individual plaque-makers produced their awards according to available materials and techniques employed by their graphic arts departments. The plaques, depending on size and elaborateness of design, cost anywhere between US$135 and $275, most often ordered and purchased by the record label that issued the original recording.

See also

Related Research Articles

Philippine Association of the Record Industry organization

The Philippine Association of the Record Industry is a non-profit and private trade organization, that represents the recording industry distributors in the Philippines.

British Phonographic Industry Trade association of the recorded music industry in the United Kingdom

The BPI Limited, commonly known as the British Phonographic Industry or BPI, is the British recorded music industry's trade association.

The Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana (FIMI) is an umbrella organization that keeps track of virtually all aspects of the music recording industry in Italy. It was established in 1992, when major corporate labels left the previously existing Associazione dei Fonografici Italiani (AFI). During the following years, most of the remaining Italian record labels left AFI to join the new organization. As of 2011, FIMI represents 2,500 companies operating in the music business.

Pro-Música Brasil organization

Pro-Música Brasil (PMB), previously Associação Brasileira dos Produtores de Discos (ABPD), is an official representative body of the record labels in the Brazilian phonographic market.

The Bundesverband Musikindustrie, or simply BVMI, represents the music industry in Germany. The association represents the interests of nearly 280 labels and music industry related enterprises, which comprise 90% of the music industry.

Belgian Entertainment Association organization

The Belgian Entertainment Association (BEA) is the organization that represents the interests of the music, video and video game industries in Belgium. It was founded in February 2008, when three organizations merged, namely IFPI Belgium, the local chapter of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), which represented the music industry, the Belgian Video Federation, which represented the video industry, and the Belgian Luxembourg Interactive Software Association, which represented the video game industry. BEA is listed as the local record industry association in Belgium by the IFPI.

Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland ry, or Musiikkituottajat for short,, IFPI Finland in English, is the umbrella organization of recording producers active in Finland, with 23 record labels as its members.

Often 2014 single by The Weeknd

"Often" is a song by Canadian singer The Weeknd. The track was released on July 31, 2014 as the first single from his second studio album, Beauty Behind the Madness (2015). The song reached number 59 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 69 on the Canadian Hot 100. The song samples the song "Ben Sana Vurgunum" sung by the Turkish singer Nükhet Duru.

References

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  6. "Gold & Platinum: Eagles/Their Greatest Hits 1971 - 1975". RIAA. Retrieved 14 August 2017.
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  9. "About the Awards". RIAA. Retrieved 14 August 2017.
  10. Price, Jeff (28 April 2011). "Getting A Gold Record By Selling Nothing". TuneCore. Retrieved 7 July 2015.
  11. "Goodbye, 2004. Hello, 2005!". Recording Industry Association of American. Retrieved 23 June 2012.
  12. "RIAA Adds Digital Streams To Historic Gold & Platinum Awards". RIAA. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  13. 1 2 Alex Pham (9 May 2013). "Exclusive: On-Demand Streams Now Count Toward RIAA Gold & Platinum". Billboard.
  14. "Neuer DIAMOND AWARD für die erfolgreichsten Singles und Alben in Deutschland" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindstie. Archived from the original on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 15 May 2014.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  15. IFPI Denmark: Guld og platin (2014) (in Danish). IFPI Denmark. 2014. Retrieved 31 May 2014.
  16. "Listas semanales: 14 July 2014 – 20.7.2014" (in Spanish). PROMUSICAE. July 2014. Archived from the original on 27 July 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  17. 1 2 Kreisler, Lauren (22 June 2014). "UK's Official Singles Chart to include streaming data for first time". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  18. Spahr, Wolfgang (7 January 2014). "Streaming Tally Joins Germany's Official Charts". Billboard.
  19. "RIAA Accepts Streams for Gold and Platinum Certifications". Billboard. 1 February 2016. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  20. "RIAA Debuts Album Award With Streams, Sam Hunt And More Receive Awards". AllAccess. 1 February 2016. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  21. "Certification Criteria". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 22 June 2012.
  22. "History of the Awards". Recording Industry Association of America. Archived from the original on 1 July 2007. Retrieved 22 June 2012.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  23. "Certified Awards Search". British Recorded Music Industry. Retrieved 20 September 2014.
  24. "Certification Definitions". Music Canada. Retrieved 15 March 2015.
  25. "Les certifications". National Syndicate of Phonographic Publishing (Syndicat national de l'édition phonographique). Retrieved 22 October 2016.Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  26. "All That Music is Not Gold". Reno Gazette-Journal. 12 March 1998. p. 65.