Districts of Indonesia

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The term district, in the context of Indonesia, refers to the third-level administrative subdivision, below regency or city. [1] [2] [3] [4] The local term kecamatan is used in majority of Indonesian areas, except in Papua, West Papua, and the Special Region of Yogyakarta. The term distrik is used in Papua and West Papua. In Yogyakarta, the term kapanewon is used for districts within regency, while the term kemantren is used for districts within city. [5] According to Statistics Indonesia, there are a total of 7,252 districts in Indonesia as at 2019, subdivided into 83,820 administrative villages (rural desa and urban kelurahan). [6]

Contents

During the Dutch East Indies and early republic period, the term district referred to kewedanan, a subdivision of regency, while kecamatan was translated as subdistrict (Dutch : onderdistrict). [7] Following the abolition of kewedanan, the term district began to be associated with kecamatan which has since been directly administered by regency. Mainstream media such as The Jakarta Post , [8] [9] [10] Kompas , [11] [12] [13] and Tempo [14] [15] [16] [17] use "district" to refer to kecamatan.

Definition

District office of Gabuswetan, Indramayu Regency, West Java Kantor Kecamatan Gabuswetan, Indramayu.jpg
District office of Gabuswetan, Indramayu Regency, West Java

District in Indonesia is the third-level administrative subdivision, below regency or city (second-level) and province (first-level). According to the Law Number 23 of 2014, district is formed by the government of regency or city in order to improve the coordination of governance, public services, and empowerment of urban/rural villages. [18] District head is a career bureaucrat position directly appointed by regent or mayor. The local district term kecamatan is used in majority of Indonesian areas, with camat being the head.

During the Dutch East Indies and early republic period, the term district referred to kewedanan, a subdivision of regency. Kewedanan itself was divided into kecamatan, which was translated as subdistrict (Dutch : onderdistrict). [7] Following the abolition of kewedanan, the term district began to be associated with kecamatan which has since been directly administered by regency. In English-language dictionary, subdistrict means "a division or subdivision of a district", hence the translation of kecamatan as subdistrict is no longer precise since the absence of kewedanan as district. [19] [20] The 1982 publication of Statistics Indonesia (BPS) translated kecamatan as district. [21]

With the release of the Law Number 21 of 2001 concerning the Special Autonomous of Papua Province, the term distrik was used instead of kecamatan in the entire Western New Guinea (Papua and West Papua). [22] The difference between the two is merely the naming, with kepala distrik being the district head. It was later followed in 2019 by another autonomous province, the Special Region of Yogyakarta, where kecamatan was replaced with kapanewon and kemantren. Sultan Hamengkubuwono X, the region's governor and the monarch of Yogyakarta Sultanate, issued Gubernatorial Decree Number 25 of 2019, which restored the old naming convention for the region's subdivisions. Kapanewon (a subdivision of regency) is headed by a panewu, while kemantren (a subdivision of city), is headed by a mantri pamong praja. [5]

List of districts

Districts by provincesNumber of districts
as of 2019 [6]
List of districts of Aceh 289
List of districts of North Sumatra 450
List of districts of West Sumatra 179
List of districts of Riau 169
List of districts of Jambi 141
List of districts of South Sumatra 241
List of districts of Bengkulu 129
List of districts of Lampung 228
List of districts of the Bangka Belitung Islands 47
List of districts of the Riau Islands 76
List of districts of Jakarta 44
List of districts of West Java 627
List of districts of Central Java 576
List of districts of the Special Region of Yogyakarta 78
List of districts of East Java 666
List of districts of Banten 155
List of districts of Bali 57
List of districts of West Nusa Tenggara 117
List of districts of East Nusa Tenggara 309
List of districts of West Kalimantan 174
List of districts of Central Kalimantan 136
List of districts of South Kalimantan 153
List of districts of East Kalimantan 103
List of districts of North Kalimantan 55
List of districts of North Sulawesi 171
List of districts of Central Sulawesi 175
List of districts of South Sulawesi 311
List of districts of Southeast Sulawesi 222
List of districts of Gorontalo 77
List of districts of West Sulawesi 69
List of districts of Maluku 118
List of districts of North Maluku 116
List of districts of West Papua 218
List of districts of Papua 576
Total7,252

Related Research Articles

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Provinces of Indonesia First-level subdivision of Indonesia

Provinces of Indonesia are the 34 administrative divisions of Indonesia and the highest tier of the local government. Provinces are further divided into regencies and cities, which are in turn subdivided into districts (kecamatan).

West Papua (province) Province of Indonesia

West Papua, formerly Irian Jaya Barat or Irian Barat, is a province of Indonesia. It covers the two western peninsulas of the island of New Guinea, Bird's Head Peninsula and Bomberai Peninsula, along with nearby islands. The province is bordered to the north by the Pacific Ocean, to the west by the Halmahera Sea and the Ceram Sea, to the south by the Banda Sea, and to the east by the province of Papua and the Cenderawasih Bay. Manokwari is the province's capital, while Sorong is its largest city. West Papua is the second-least populous province in Indonesia, with a population of 1,134,068 at the 2020 Census.

A regency is an administrative division of Indonesia, directly under a province. The Indonesian term kabupaten is also sometimes translated as "municipality". Regencies and cities are divided into districts.

Subdivisions of Indonesia

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In Indonesia, village or subdistrict is the fourth-level subdivision below a district, regency/city, and province. There are a number of names and types for villages in Indonesia, with desa being the most frequently used for regencies and kelurahan for cities. According to the 2019 report by the Ministry of Home Affairs, there are 8,488 urban villages and 74,953 rural villages in Indonesia.

Keerom Regency Regency in Papua, Indonesia

Keerom Regency is one of the regencies (kabupaten) in the Papua Province of Indonesia. It was formed from the eastern districts then within Jayapura Regency with effect from 12 November 2002. It covers an area of 9,365 km2, and had a population of 48,536 at the 2010 Census and 61,623 at the 2020 Census. The regency's administrative centre is at Waris. It borders Green River Rural LLG and Amanab Rural LLG of Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea.

Ambelau Island and district in Buru Selatan Regency, Maluku Province, Indonesia

Ambelau or Ambalau is a volcanic island in the Banda Sea within Maluku Islands of Indonesia. The island forms an administrative district which is part of the South Buru Regency of Maluku province, Indonesia. It has a land area of 201.7 km2, and had a population of 6,846 at the 2010 Census. The administrative center is Wailua, a settlement located at the south of the island. About half of the island's population is composed of indigenous Ambelau people who speak the Ambelau language; the other half are mostly immigrants from the nearby Maluku Islands and Java.

Minahasa Regency Regency in North Sulawesi, Indonesia

Minahasa Regency is a regency in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Its capital is Tondano. It covers an area of 1,141.64 km2 and had a population of 310,384 at the 2010 Census; this rose to 347,290 at the 2020 Census.

Southeast Maluku Regency Regency in Maluku, Indonesia

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West Muna Regency Regency in Sulawesi, Indonesia

West Muna Regency is a new regency of Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, established under Act No.14 of 2014, dated 23 July 2014 by separation from the Muna Regency. It covers an area of 906.28 km2, and the districts comprising it had a population of 71,632 at the 2010 Census; the 2020 Census resulted in a population of 84,590. The administrative centre lies at Laworo.

Central Buton Regency Regency in Sulawesi, Indonesia

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South Buton Regency Regency in Sulawesi, Indonesia

South Buton Regency is a regency located in Southeast Sulawesi. This regency was formed from the southern part of Buton Regency, from which it was separated by Act No.16 of 2014, dated 23 July 2014. It covers an area of 546.58 km2, and the population of the districts now comprising the new regency was 74,974 at the 2010 Census and 95,261 at the 2020 Census. The regency capital is located in Batauga.

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This is a list of emblems or seals used in Indonesia. Indonesia is divided into 34 provinces, and each province is divided into regencies (kabupaten) and cities (kota). There are 416 regencies and 98 cities. Each province, regency, and city has its own emblem.

In Indonesian law, the term "city" (kota) is generally defined as the second-level administrative subdivision of the Republic of Indonesia, an equivalent to regency (kabupaten). The difference between a city and a regency is that a city has non-agricultural economic activities and a dense urban population, while a regency comprises predominantly rural areas and is larger in area than a city. However, Indonesia historically had several classifications of cities.

References

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