Districts of Indonesia

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The term district, in the context of Indonesia, refers to the third-level administrative subdivision, below regency or city. [1] [2] [3] [4] The local term kecamatan is used in majority of Indonesian areas, except in Papua, West Papua, and the Special Region of Yogyakarta. The term distrik is used in Papua and West Papua. In Yogyakarta, the term kapanewon is used for districts within regency, while the term kemantren is used for districts within city. [5] According to Statistics Indonesia, there are a total of 7,024 districts in Indonesia as of 2014. [6]

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During the Dutch East Indies and early republic period, the term district referred to kewedanan, a subdivision of regency, while kecamatan was translated as subdistrict (Dutch : onderdistrict). [7] Following the abolition of kewedanan, the term district began to be associated with kecamatan which has since been directly administered by regency. Mainstream media such as The Jakarta Post , [8] [9] [10] Kompas , [11] [12] [13] and Tempo [14] [15] [16] [17] use "district" to refer to kecamatan.

Definition

District office of Gabuswetan, Indramayu Regency, West Java Kantor Kecamatan Gabuswetan, Indramayu.jpg
District office of Gabuswetan, Indramayu Regency, West Java

District in Indonesia is the third-level administrative subdivision, below regency or city (second-level) and province (first-level). According to the Act Number 23 of 2014, district is formed by the government of regency or city in order to improve the coordination of governance, public services, and empowerment of urban/rural villages. [18] District head is a career bureaucrat position directly appointed by regent or mayor. The local district term kecamatan is used in majority of Indonesian areas, with camat being the head.

During the Dutch East Indies and early republic period, the term district referred to kewedanan, a subdivision of regency. Kewedanan itself was divided into kecamatan, which was translated as subdistrict (Dutch : onderdistrict). [7] Following the abolition of kewedanan, the term district began to be associated with kecamatan which has since been directly administered by regency. In English-language dictionary, subdistrict means "a division or subdivision of a district", hence the translation of kecamatan as subdistrict is no longer precise since the absence of kewedanan as district. [19] [20] The 1982 publication of Statistics Indonesia (BPS) translated kecamatan as district. [21]

With the release of the Act Number 21 of 2001 concerning the Special Autonomous of Papua Province, the term distrik was used instead of kecamatan in the entire Western New Guinea (Papua and West Papua). [22] The difference between the two is merely the naming, with kepala distrik being the district head. It was later followed in 2019 by another autonomous province, the Special Region of Yogyakarta, where kecamatan was replaced with kapanewon and kemantren. Sultan Hamengkubuwono X, the region's governor and the monarch of Yogyakarta Sultanate, issued Gubernatorial Decree Number 25 of 2019, which restored the old naming convention for the region's subdivisions. Kapanewon (a subdivision of regency) is headed by a panewu, while kemantren (a subdivision of city), is headed by a mantri pamong praja. [5]

List of districts

Districts by provincesNumber of districts
as of 2014 [6]
List of districts of Aceh 289
List of districts of North Sumatra 440
List of districts of West Sumatra 179
List of districts of Riau 164
List of districts of Jambi 138
List of districts of South Sumatra 231
List of districts of Bengkulu 127
List of districts of Lampung 227
List of districts of the Bangka Belitung Islands 47
List of districts of the Riau Islands 66
List of districts of Jakarta 44
List of districts of West Java 626
List of districts of Central Java 573
List of districts of the Special Region of Yogyakarta 78
List of districts of East Java 664
List of districts of Banten 155
List of districts of Bali 57
List of districts of West Nusa Tenggara 116
List of districts of East Nusa Tenggara 306
List of districts of West Kalimantan 174
List of districts of Central Kalimantan 136
List of districts of South Kalimantan 152
List of districts of East Kalimantan 103
List of districts of North Kalimantan 50
List of districts of North Sulawesi 167
List of districts of Central Sulawesi 172
List of districts of South Sulawesi 306
List of districts of Southeast Sulawesi 213
List of districts of Gorontalo 77
List of districts of West Sulawesi 69
List of districts of Maluku 118
List of districts of North Maluku 115
List of districts of West Papua 175
List of districts of Papua 470
Total7,024

Related Research Articles

Papua (province) Province of Indonesia

Papua is the largest and easternmost province of Indonesia, comprising most of Western New Guinea. It is bordered by the state of Papua New Guinea to the east, the province of West Papua to the west, the Pacific Ocean to the north, and the Arafura Sea to the south. According to the 2010 census by Statistics Indonesia, Papua had a population of 2,833,381, the majority of whom are Christians. The 2015 Intermediate Census revealed a population of 3,143,088, while the latest official estimate is 3,379,302. The province is divided into twenty-eight regencies and one city. Its capital and largest city is Jayapura.

There are 34 largest subdivisions of the country Indonesia and the highest tier of the local government. Provinces are further divided into regencies and cities, which are in turn subdivided into districts (kecamatan).

Subdivisions of Indonesia

Indonesia is divided into provinces. Provinces are made up of regencies and cities. Provinces, regencies and cities have their own local governments and parliamentary bodies.

In Indonesia, village or subdistrict is the fourth-level subdivision below a district, regency/city, and province. There are a number of names and types for villages in Indonesia, with desa being the most frequently used for regencies and kelurahan for cities. According to the 2019 report by the Ministry of Home Affairs, there are 8,488 urban villages and 74,953 rural villages in Indonesia.

Asmat Regency Regency in Papua, Indonesia

Asmat Regency is one of the regencies (kabupaten) in the southern portion of Papua Province of Indonesia. It was split off from Merauke Regency on 12 November 2002. Asmat Regency consists of an area of 31,983.69 km2, and had a population of 76,577 at the 2010 Census and 88,373 at the 2015 Intermediate Census, mostly from the Asmat ethnic group. The administrative centre of the regency is the town of Agats.

Puncak Jaya Regency Regency in Papua, Indonesia

Puncak Jaya Regency is one of the regencies (kabupaten) in Papua Province, Indonesia. It is an inland highland regency, lying directly east of Paniai Regency and west of Jayawijaya Regency and Tolikara Regency. As of 2004, it was reported that these four regencies had a population that is 93–97% ethnic Papua; however this included areas which have subsequently been formed into new regencies.

Keerom Regency Regency in Papua, Indonesia

Keerom Regency is one of the regencies (kabupaten) in the Papua Province of Indonesia. It was formed from the eastern districts then within Jayapura Regency with effect from 12 November 2002. It covers an area of 8,390 km2, and had a population of 48,536 at the 2010 Census; the latest official estimate is 59,723. The regency's administrative centre is at Waris. It borders Green River Rural LLG and Amanab Rural LLG of Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea.

South Minahasa Regency Regency in North Sulawesi, Indonesia

South Minahasa Regency is a regency in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Its capital is Amurang. It covers an area of 1,456.46 km2, and had a population of 195,553 at the 2010 Census; this had risen to 204,832 at the 2015 Intermediate Census, and the latest official estimate is 210,400. It was originally part of the Minahasa Regency until it was established as a separate regency on 25 February 2003.

Agats Town in Papua, Indonesia

Bis Agats is a town in Agats District of Asmat Regency, Papua, Indonesia. An elevated settlement on a tidal plain, a Dutch outpost was set up in Agats in 1938 and the town became notable for the cultural practices of the Asmat people. Following the formation of Asmat Regency in 2002, the town became its administrative seat.

Jakob Oetama Indonesian journalist

Jakob Oetama was an Indonesian senior journalist and businessman who was one of the co-founders and owners of Kompas Gramedia Group, the largest media group in Indonesia. Together with P.K. Ojong in 1965 he established the Kompas daily, the leading national broadsheet newspaper in Indonesia, where he was editor-in-chief until 2000.

In Indonesian law, the term "city" (kota) is generally defined as the second-level administrative subdivision of the Republic of Indonesia, an equivalent to regency (kabupaten). The difference between a city and a regency is that a city has non-agricultural economic activities and a dense urban population, while a regency comprises predominantly rural areas and is larger in area than a city. However, Indonesia historically had several classifications of cities.

Jimmy Demianus Ijie is an Indonesian politician from West Papua. He is a member of the Indonesian House of Representatives from the Indonesian Democratic Party - Struggle (PDI-P). He was elected in 2019 from the West Papua electoral district with 66.555 votes.

Ciawi, Bogor District in West Java, Indonesia

Ciawi is a district in the Bogor Regency, West Java, Indonesia. It neighbors the city of Bogor to its northwest.

Marthen Douw Indonesian politician

Marthen Douw is a politician from Papua. He was elected as a member of the Indonesian Parliament for 2019–2024. He is the only member of the National Awakening Party from the national electoral district of Papua. Despite his young age, he was a member of the Regional Representative Council of the Nabire Regency for the period 2014–2019.

Putih Sari Indonesian politician

Putih Sari is an Indonesian politician and legislator. She became a member of the Indonesian Parliament for the Gerindra Party in the national electoral district West Java VII. She was part of Commission IX of the DPR.

Busiri Suryowinoto

Busiri Suryowinoto was an Indonesian military officer and politician who served as the Indonesian ambassador to Papua New Guinea from 1977 until 1980, and as the governor of Irian Jaya from 1981 until 1982.

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