List of International Organization for Standardization standards

Last updated

This is a list of published [note 1] International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards and other deliverables. [note 2] For a complete and up-to-date list of all the ISO standards, see the ISO catalogue. [1]

Contents

The standards are protected by copyright and most of them must be purchased. However, about 300 of the standards produced by ISO and IEC's Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC1) have been made freely and publicly available. [2]

ISO 1 – ISO 19999

ISO 20000 – ISO 29999

ISO 30000 – ISO 39999

ISO 40000 – ISO 49999

ISO 50000 – ISO 59999

ISO 60000 – ISO 69999

ISO 80000 – ISO 89999

ISO 90000 – ISO 99999

See also

Notes

  1. This list generally excludes draft versions.
  2. ISO deliverables include "specifications" (ISO/PAS, ISO/TS), "reports" (ISO/TR), etc, which are not referred to by ISO as "standards".
  3. The exact wording of this title varies between parts. This is the wording of the most recently published part.

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ISO/IEC 20000 is the first international standard for service management. It was developed in 2005 by ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7 and revised in 2011 and 2018. It was originally based on the earlier BS 15000 that was developed by BSI Group.

The ISO/IEC 27000-series comprises information security standards published jointly by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

Information technology risk, IT risk, IT-related risk, or cyber risk is any risk related to information technology. While information has long been appreciated as a valuable and important asset, the rise of the knowledge economy and the Digital Revolution has led to organizations becoming increasingly dependent on information, information processing and especially IT. Various events or incidents that compromise IT in some way can therefore cause adverse impacts on the organization's business processes or mission, ranging from inconsequential to catastrophic in scale.

ISO/IEC 29110: Systems and Software Life Cycle Profiles and Guidelines for Very Small Entities (VSEs) International Standards (IS) and Technical Reports (TR) are targeted at Very Small Entities (VSEs). A Very Small Entity (VSE) is an enterprise, an organization, a department or a project having up to 25 people. The ISO/IEC 29110 is a series of international standards and guides entitled "Systems and Software Engineering — Lifecycle Profiles for Very Small Entities (VSEs)". The standards and technical reports were developed by working group 24 (WG24) of sub-committee 7 (SC7) of Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC1) of the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission.

The Annex L is a section of the ISO/IEC Directives part 1 that prescribes how ISO Management System Standard (MSS) standards should be written. The aim of Annex L is to enhance the consistency and alignment of MSS by providing a unifying and agreed upon high level structure, identical core text and common terms and core definitions. The aim being that all ISO Type A MSS are aligned and the compatibility of these standards is enhanced.

References

  1. "Standards catalogue". ISO.
  2. "Freely Available Standards". ISO.