Alabama's 4th congressional district

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Coordinates: 34°1′31.25″N87°7′57.25″W / 34.0253472°N 87.1325694°W / 34.0253472; -87.1325694

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Alabama's 4th congressional district
Alabama US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
Alabama's 4th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Robert Aderholt
RHaleyville
Area8,524 sq mi (22,080 km2)
Distribution
  • 65.38% rural [1]
  • 34.62% urban
Population (2021)708,532 [2]
Median household
income
$51,145 [3]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVI R+33 [4]

Alabama's 4th congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in Alabama, which elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives. It encompasses the counties of Franklin, Colbert, Marion, Lamar, Fayette, Walker, Winston, Cullman, Lawrence, Marshall, Etowah, and DeKalb. It also includes parts of Jackson and Tuscaloosa counties, as well as parts of the Decatur Metropolitan Area and the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area.

It is currently represented by Republican Robert Aderholt. In the 2016 United States presidential election, the district was the only one in the country to give Donald Trump more than 80% of the vote, making it his strongest district in the country. [5] Trump even improved on his 2016 performance in 2020, winning 81% of the vote. With a Cook Partisan Voting Index rating of R+34, it is the most Republican district in the United States. [4]

Voting

Election results from statewide races
YearOfficeResults
2020 President Trump 81 - 18%
2016 President Trump 80 - 18%
2012 President Romney 75 - 24%
2008 President McCain 76 - 22%
2004 President Bush 71 - 28%
2000 President Bush 61 - 37%

List of members representing the district

MemberPartyYearsCong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1833
DixonHallLewis.jpg
Dixon Hall Lewis
Nullifier March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
23rd
24th
25th
26th
Redistricted from the 3rd district . and re-elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1835.
Re-elected in 1837.
Re-elected in 1839.
Redistricted to the at-large district .
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
District inactiveMarch 3, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th All representatives elected at-large on a general ticket.
William Winter Payne Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1847
28th
29th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1843.
Re-elected in 1845.
Lost re-election.
Samuel Williams Inge Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
30th
31st
Elected in 1847.
Re-elected in 1849.
Retired.
William Russell Smith - Sudstaatenpolitiker.jpg
William Russell Smith
Unionist March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd
33rd
34th
Elected in 1851.
Re-elected in 1853.
Re-elected in 1855.
Lost re-election.
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
American March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Hon. Moore - NARA - 528447.jpg
Sydenham Moore
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
January 21, 1861
35th
36th
Elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
Withdrew due to Civil War.
VacantJanuary 21, 1861 –
July 21, 1868
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
Civil War and Reconstruction
Charles Wilson Pierce Republican July 21, 1868 –
March 3, 1869
40th Elected for partial term in 1868.
Retired.
CharlesHays.jpg
Charles Hays
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1877
41st
42nd
43rd
44th
Elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Retired.
Charles M. Shelley.jpg
Charles M. Shelley
Democratic March 4, 1877 –
July 20, 1882
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Seat declared vacant after election contest by James Q. Smith.
VacantJuly 20, 1882 –
November 7, 1882
47th
Charles M. Shelley.jpg
Charles M. Shelley
Democratic November 7, 1882 –
January 9, 1885
47th
48th
Elected to fill the vacancy.
Also elected to the next term in 1882.
Lost election contest.
George Henry Craig Republican January 9, 1885 –
March 3, 1885
48th Successfully contested Shelley's re-election.
Lost re-election.
Alexander C. Davidson Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
49th
50th
Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Lost renomination.
Louis Washington Turpin Democratic March 4, 1889 –
June 4, 1890
51st Elected in 1888.
Lost election contest.
John Van McDuffie Republican June 4, 1890 –
March 3, 1891
Successfully contested Turpin's 1888 election.
Lost re-election.
Louis Washington Turpin Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
McDuffie unsuccessfully contested the election.
Redistricted to the 9th district .
Gaston A. Robbins Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 13, 1896
53rd
54th
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Lost election contest.
William F. Aldrich, Republican Congressman from Alabama, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front LCCN2008680667.jpg
William F. Aldrich
Republican March 13, 1896 –
March 3, 1897
54th Successfully contested Robbins's 1894 election.
Lost re-election.
Thomas S. Plowman Democratic March 4, 1897 –
February 9, 1898
55th Elected in 1896.
Lost election contest.
William F. Aldrich, Republican Congressman from Alabama, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front LCCN2008680667.jpg
William F. Aldrich
Republican February 9, 1898 –
March 3, 1899
Successfully contested Plowman's 1896 election.
Lost re-election.
Gaston A. Robbins Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 8, 1900
56th Elected in 1898.
Lost election contest.
William F. Aldrich, Republican Congressman from Alabama, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front LCCN2008680667.jpg
William F. Aldrich
Republican March 8, 1900 –
March 3, 1901
Successfully contested Robbins's 1898 election.
Retired.
Sydney J. Bowie Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1907
57th
58th
59th
Elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Retired.
William Benjamin Craig.jpg
William Benjamin Craig
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1911
60th
61st
Elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Retired.
Fred L. Blackmon.jpeg
Fred L. Blackmon
Democratic March 4, 1911 –
February 8, 1921
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
Elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920 but died before that term began.
VacantFebruary 8, 1921 –
June 7, 1921
66th
67th
Lamar Jeffers.jpeg
Lamar Jeffers
Democratic June 7, 1921 –
January 3, 1935
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
Elected to finish Blackmon's term.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Lost renomination.
Samuel Francis Hobbs.jpg
Sam Hobbs
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1951
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Retired.
Kenneth A. Roberts.jpg
Kenneth A. Roberts
Democratic January 3, 1951 –
January 3, 1963
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the at-large district .
District inactiveJanuary 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1965
88th All representatives elected at-large on a general ticket.
A Glenn Andrews.png
Glenn Andrews
Republican January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1967
89th Elected in 1964.
Lost re-election.
Congressman William F. Nichols Official Portrait, 1986.jpg
Bill Nichols
Democratic January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1973
90th
91st
92nd
Elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Redistricted to the 3rd district .
Tombevill.jpg
Tom Bevill
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1997
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Retired.
Robert Aderholt official photo (cropped).jpg
Robert Aderholt
Republican January 3, 1997 –
Present
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.

Recent election results

These are the results from the previous ten election cycles in Alabama's 4th district. [6]

2002

2002 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 139,705 86.72%
Libertarian Tony H. McLendon20,85812.95%
Write-in 5380.33%
Total votes161,101 100%
Republican hold

2004

2004 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 191,110 74.73%
Democratic Carl Cole64,27825.14%
Write-in 3360.13%
Total votes255,724 100%
Republican hold

2006

2006 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 128,484 70.18%
Democratic Barbara Bobo54,38229.71%
Write-in 2060.11%
Total votes183,072 100%
Republican hold

2008

2008 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 196,741 74.76%
Democratic Nicholas B. Sparks66,07725.11%
Write-in 3490.13%
Total votes263,167 100%
Republican hold

2010

2010 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 167,714 98.82%
Write-in 2,0071.18%
Total votes169,721 100%
Republican hold

2012

2012 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 199,071 73.97%
Democratic Daniel Boman 69,70625.90%
Write-in 3410.13%
Total votes269,118 100%
Republican hold

2014

2014 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 132,831 98.57%
Write-in 1,9211.43%
Total votes134,752 100%
Republican hold

2016

2016 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 235,925 98.53%
Write-in 3,5191.47%
Total votes239,444 100%
Republican hold

2018

2018 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 184,255 79.78%
Democratic Lee Auman46,49220.13%
Write-in 2220.10%
Total votes230,969 100%
Republican hold

2020

2020 Alabama's 4th congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 261,553 82.24%
Democratic Rick Neighbors56,23717.68%
Write-in 2390.08%
Total votes318,029 100%
Republican hold

Notes

Alabama will hold their Primary Elections on May 24, 2022. Should no candidate receive 50% of the Primary Election vote, than a Primary Runoff Election will be held on June 21, 2022. [7] There are currently only four declared candidates for Alabama's 4th Congressional District for the 2022 Election Cycle. [8] [9]

2022 Alabama's 4th Congressional District Primary Elections
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRobert Aderholt *TBDTBD
RepublicanJosh GaddisTBDTBD
DemocraticRhonda GoreTBDTBD
DemocraticRick NeighborsTBDTBD

The incumbent office holder is denoted by an *.

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013 AL04 110.png
2003 - 2013

See also

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References

Specific
  1. "Congressional Districts | 113th 114th Congress Demographics | Urban Rural Patterns".
  2. "My Congressional District".
  3. "My Congressional District".
  4. 1 2 "Introducing the 2022 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". June 8, 2022. Retrieved June 12, 2022.
  5. "Daily Kos Elections presents the 2016 presidential election results by congressional district".
  6. "AL - District 04". Our Campaigns. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  7. Secretary of State, Alabama (October 12, 2021). "Administrative Calendar -- 2022 Statewide Election" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  8. Gunzburger, Ron. "Politics1 - Online Guide to Alabama Elections, Candidates & Politics". politics1.com. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  9. "Alabama's 4th Congressional District election, 2022". Ballotpedia. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
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