Walbottle

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Walbottle
Walbottle Hall - geograph.org.uk - 738135.jpg
Walbottle Hall
Tyne and Wear UK location map.svg
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Walbottle
Location within Tyne and Wear
OS grid reference NZ175665
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
Postcode district NE15
Dialling code 0191
Police Northumbria
Fire Tyne and Wear
Ambulance North East
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Tyne and Wear
54°59′35″N1°43′41″W / 54.993°N 1.728°W / 54.993; -1.728 Coordinates: 54°59′35″N1°43′41″W / 54.993°N 1.728°W / 54.993; -1.728

Walbottle is a village in Tyne and Wear. It is a western suburb of Newcastle upon Tyne. The village name, recorded in 1176 as "Walbotl", is derived from the Old English botl (building) on Hadrian's Wall. There are a number of Northumbrian villages which are suffixed "-bottle".

Contents

Bede, in his Ecclesiastical History of the English People , refers to a royal estate called Ad Murum near the Roman Wall where, in 653 AD, the King of the Middle Angles, Peada, and the King of the East Saxons, Sigeberht, were both baptised as Christians by Bishop Finan, having been persuaded to do so by King Oswy of Northumbria. Historians have identified Ad Murum with Walbottle.

Ann Potter, the mother of Lord Armstrong, the famous industrialist, was born at Walbottle Hall in 1780 and lived there until 1801.

Notable people

Born in Walbottle
Worked in Walbottle


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