Warren, Arkansas

Last updated
Warren, Arkansas
City
Bradley County Courthouse 001.jpg
Bradley County Arkansas Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Warren Highlighted 0573310.svg
Location of Warren in Bradley County, Arkansas.
Coordinates: 33°36′37″N92°4′11″W / 33.61028°N 92.06972°W / 33.61028; -92.06972 Coordinates: 33°36′37″N92°4′11″W / 33.61028°N 92.06972°W / 33.61028; -92.06972
Country United States
State Arkansas
County Bradley
Area [1]
  Total 7.06 sq mi (18.28 km2)
  Land 7.04 sq mi (18.22 km2)
  Water 0.02 sq mi (0.06 km2)
Elevation 220 ft (67 m)
Population (2010)
  Total 6,003
  Estimate (2017) [2] 5,653
  Density 803.44/sq mi (310.23/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code 71671
Area code(s) 870
FIPS code 05-73310
GNIS feature ID 0078699

Warren is a city in and the county seat of Bradley County, Arkansas, United States. [3] As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,003. [4]

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Bradley County, Arkansas County in the United States

Bradley County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,508. The county seat is Warren. It is Arkansas's 43rd county, formed on December 18, 1840, and named for Captain Hugh Bradley, who fought in the War of 1812. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county, and is the home of the Bradley County Pink Tomato Festival.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Contents

History

When settlers from the east began to arrive in south Arkansas, the land was inhabited by the indigenous tribe known as the Quapaw. The earliest cession of territory was made in 1818, with a later boundary against the neighboring Choctaw tribe in 1820, opening up the southeastern corner of the Arkansas Territory for settlement. Although the area had been settled by European-Americans for approximately thirty years, the city itself was not incorporated until 1851. Tradition says the city is named after a former slave, freed by Captain Hugh Bradley, the namesake of the county and leader of the main early settlement party which established the city. The original plat was laid out on land donated by Isaac Pennington, a key member of Bradley's company.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas Pre-Columbian inhabitants of North, Central and South America and their descendants

The indigenous peoples of the Americas are the Pre-Columbian peoples of North, Central and South America and their descendants.

Quapaw ethnic group

The Quapaw people are a tribe of Native Americans that coalesced in the Midwest and Ohio Valley. The Dhegiha Siouan-speaking tribe historically migrated from the Ohio Valley area to the west side of the Mississippi River and resettled in what is now the state of Arkansas; their name for themselves refers to this migration and traveling downriver.

Choctaw Native American people originally from the Southeastern United States

The Choctaw are a Native American people originally occupying what is now the Southeastern United States. Their Choctaw language belongs to the Muskogean language family group. Hopewell and Mississippian cultures, who lived throughout the east of the Mississippi River valley and its tributaries. About 1,700 years ago, the Hopewell people built Nanih Waiya, a great earthwork mound located in what is central present-day Mississippi. It is still considered sacred by the Choctaw. The early Spanish explorers of the mid-16th century in the Southeast encountered Mississippian-culture villages and chiefs. The anthropologist John R. Swanton suggested that the Choctaw derived their name from an early leader. Henry Halbert, a historian, suggests that their name is derived from the Choctaw phrase Hacha hatak.

Around the turn of the twentieth century, Warren found itself in the middle of a boom in the timber industry, a resource which continues to be important to the city's economy, although the lumber yards that were vital to Warren throughout the past century are no longer in operation.

The city's Victorian-era courthouse was originally built in 1903 and still maintains the exterior character, despite necessary refurbishments to the interior offices and courtroom.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

Geography

Warren is located in northeast Bradley County on high ground 2 miles (3 km) west of the Saline River, a tributary of the Ouachita River. U.S. Route 63 passes through the center of the city, leading north 46 miles (74 km) to Pine Bluff and southwest 50 miles (80 km) to El Dorado. U.S. Route 278 bypasses Warren to the south and leads east 16 miles (26 km) to Monticello and west 26 miles (42 km) to Hampton.

Ouachita River river in the United States of America

The Ouachita River is a 605-mile-long (974 km) river that runs south and east through the U.S. states of Arkansas and Louisiana, joining the Tensas River to form the Black River near Jonesville, Louisiana. It is the 25th-longest river in the United States.

U.S. Route 63 highway in the United States

U.S. Route 63 is a major 1,286-mile (2,070 km) north–south United States highway primarily in the Midwestern and Southern United States. The southern terminus of the route is at Interstate 20 in Ruston, Louisiana. The northern terminus is at U.S. Route 2 in Benoit, Wisconsin, about 60 miles (97 km) east of Duluth, Minnesota.

Pine Bluff, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Pine Bluff is the tenth-largest city in the state of Arkansas and the county seat of Jefferson County. It is the principal city of the Pine Bluff Metropolitan Statistical Area and part of the Little Rock-North Little Rock-Pine Bluff Combined Statistical Area. The population of the city was 49,083 in the 2010 Census with 2017 estimates showing a decline to 42,984.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Warren has a total area of 7.2 square miles (18.7 km2), of which 0.023 square miles (0.06 km2), or 0.33%, is water. [4]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Warren has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [5] Tornadoes have occurred on at least two occasions. The first occurred on January 3, 1949, killing 55 people and injuring 435. On March 28, 1975, another tornado killed seven people and injured 51. [6] Both were rated F4 on the Fujita scale. [7]

Humid subtropical climate category in the Köppen climate classification system

A humid subtropical climate is a zone of climate characterized by hot and humid summers, and mild winters. These climates normally lie on the southeast side of all continents, generally between latitudes 25° and 40° and are located poleward from adjacent tropical climates. While many subtropical climates tend to be located at or near coastal locations, in some cases they extend inland, most notably in China and the United States, where they exhibit more pronounced seasonal variations and sharper contrasts between summer and winter, as part of a gradient between the more tropical climates of the southern coasts of these countries and the more continental climates of China and the United States’ northern and central regions.

Tornado violently rotating column of air that is in contact with both the earths surface and a cumulonimbus cloud in the air

A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. The windstorm is often referred to as a twister, whirlwind or cyclone, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology to name a weather system with a low-pressure area in the center around which, from an observer looking down toward the surface of the earth, winds blow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern. Tornadoes come in many shapes and sizes, and they are often visible in the form of a condensation funnel originating from the base of a cumulonimbus cloud, with a cloud of rotating debris and dust beneath it. Most tornadoes have wind speeds less than 110 miles per hour (180 km/h), are about 250 feet (80 m) across, and travel a few miles before dissipating. The most extreme tornadoes can attain wind speeds of more than 300 miles per hour (480 km/h), are more than two miles (3 km) in diameter, and stay on the ground for dozens of miles.

The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita–Pearson scale, is a scale for rating tornado intensity, based primarily on the damage tornadoes inflict on human-built structures and vegetation. The official Fujita scale category is determined by meteorologists and engineers after a ground or aerial damage survey, or both; and depending on the circumstances, ground-swirl patterns, weather radar data, witness testimonies, media reports and damage imagery, as well as photogrammetry or videogrammetry if motion picture recording is available. The Fujita scale was replaced with the Enhanced Fujita scale (EF-Scale) in the United States in February 2007. In April 2013, Canada adopted the EF-Scale over the Fujita scale along with 31 "Specific Damage Indicators" used by Environment Canada (EC) in their ratings.

Arts and culture

Annual cultural events

The Bradley County Pink Tomato Festival is held yearly in Warren, normally the second week of June. Begun in 1956, the festival is one of Arkansas' longest-running annual community festivals. Organized by the Bradley County Chamber of Commerce, the festival celebrates the South Arkansas Vine Ripe Pink Tomato, a special variety of tomato which holds the distinction of being Arkansas' state fruit and state vegetable. The festival has a tradition of being well-planned, with such activities as tomato-eating contests and street dances, the atmosphere of which benefit greatly from the layout of broad brick-paved streets around the courthouse square.

Education

Public education for early childhood, elementary and secondary school students is provided by Warren School District. There are five schools within the school district, A preschool, two elementary schools (k-3rd grade & 4th-5th grade), a middle school (6th-8th grades), and a high school (9th-12th grades). High Schoolers have the opportunity to cross the sidewalk on campus to attend SEACBEC, a local community college, which offers courses in computer engineering technologies, construction, medical, welding, etc.

Every year SEACBEC takes a group of students to the SkillsUSA Convention in Hot Springs to compete against other schools.

School Athletics

Warren High School's athletic emblem and mascot is The Fightin' Lumberjacks. The Junior High sports teams are known as the Jr. Jacks. The school colors are orange and black. The Warren Lumberjacks are 4 time state champions in football. The Lumberjack football team won the Class AAA State Championship in 2001, 2002, and Class 4A Championship in 2014, and 2016. The Warren Lumberjack football program now has 18 conference championships. They were also the 2006, 2013, and 2017 Class 4A State Runner-up in Football. The Lumberjack baseball team were the Class AAA State Champions in 2005. Warren also holds state titles in basketball(1931), boys track(1994), girls tennis(1993), and girls track(1992 and 1994)and Soccer(2018). After the 2015 football season, the school district announced that synthetic turf would replace the natural grass field at Jim Hurley Jr Stadium. It was completed in the summer of 2016. With a traditional powerhouse football team and growing soccer program, Lumberjack field will be a premiere venue in southeast Arkansas. The Warren Soccer Jacks advanced to their first state championship match in 2017 finishing runner up. In 2018, they captured their first class 4A state soccer title. With the addition of the 2018 state title in soccer, that brings the Warren High School state title count to 18 state championships.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 301
1890 49263.5%
1900 95493.9%
1910 2,057115.6%
1920 2,1454.3%
1930 2,52317.6%
1940 2,516−0.3%
1950 2,6153.9%
1960 6,752158.2%
1970 6,433−4.7%
1980 7,64618.9%
1990 6,455−15.6%
2000 6,442−0.2%
2010 6,003−6.8%
Est. 20175,653 [2] −5.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the census [9] of 2000, the racial makeup of the city was 52.46% White, 46.79% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.82% from other races, and 0.65% from two or more races. 5.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Out of households reporting, 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.6% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.1% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 20.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $22,162, and the median income for a family was $27,618. Males had a median income of $27,778 versus $17,247 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,453. About 24.3% of families and 28.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.4% of those under age 18 and 23.9% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

See also

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References

  1. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 22, 2018.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Warren city, Arkansas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved September 25, 2013.
  5. Climate Summary for Warren, Arkansas
  6. http://www.tornadoproject.com/alltorns/worstts.htm
  7. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-01-28. Retrieved 2015-01-25.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  9. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. "Maud Robinson Crawford (1891-1957)". encyclopediaofarkansas.net. Retrieved January 14, 2011.