Mountain View, Arkansas

Last updated

Mountain View, Arkansas
City
Downtown Mountain View, AR 021.jpg
Music on the steps of the Stone County Courthouse
Nickname(s): 
Folk Music Capitol of the World
Motto(s): 
"Your Place in the Mountains" [1]
Stone County Arkansas Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Mountain View Highlighted 0547540.svg
Location of Mountain View in Stone County, Arkansas.
Coordinates: 35°51′54″N92°6′31″W / 35.86500°N 92.10861°W / 35.86500; -92.10861 Coordinates: 35°51′54″N92°6′31″W / 35.86500°N 92.10861°W / 35.86500; -92.10861
CountryUnited States
State Arkansas
County Stone
Government
  MayorRoger Gardner
Area
[2]
  Total7.30 sq mi (18.91 km2)
  Land7.30 sq mi (18.90 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.01 km2)
Elevation
761 ft (232 m)
Population
  Total2,748
  Estimate 
(2017) [3]
2,853
  Density391.04/sq mi (150.99/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
72533, 72560
Area code(s) 870
FIPS code 05-47540
GNIS feature ID0077769
Website Mountain View Arkansas Chamber of Commerce

Mountain View is the largest city in and the county seat of Stone County, Arkansas, United States. Located in the Ozarks, the city has a rich tradition of preserving folk music and culture. Founded in 1873, the city's economy is largely based on tourism related to its title as the "Folk Music Capitol of the World". Mountain View hosts the Arkansas Folk Festival in April, various folk artists at Ozark Folk Center State Park throughout the year, and weekly music gatherings on the courthouse steps that are free and open to the public. The city is also known for outdoors recreation opportunities, including Blanchard Springs Caverns, trout fishing on the White River and the Ozark National Forest.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Stone County, Arkansas County in the United States

Stone County is located in the Ozark Mountains in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for rugged, rocky area terrain of the Ozarks. Created as Arkansas's 74th county on April 21, 1873, Stone County has two incorporated cities: Mountain View, the county seat and most populous city, and Fifty-Six. The county is also the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns.

Blanchard Springs Caverns geographical object

Blanchard Springs Caverns is a cave system located in the Ozark–St. Francis National Forest in Stone County in northern Arkansas, 2 miles off Highway 14 a short distance north of Mountain View. It is the only tourist cave owned by the United States Forest Service and the only one owned by the Federal government outside the National Park System. Blanchard Springs Caverns is a three-level cave system, all of which can be viewed on guided tours. The Dripstone Trail runs through the uppermost level of caverns for about a half-mile and opened in 1973. The Discovery Trail opened in 1977 and loops through a 1.2-mile section of the cavern, descending to the lower level of the cave, 366 feet underground, as well as to the Natural Entrance, about 100 feet below ground at that point, following the stream bed of the springs that created the cavern. This trail includes the Rimstone Dams, which create pools along the stream bed, and the Ghost Room, a small but very well decorated room in the uppermost level, with its huge white flowstone. Also offered is a "Wild Cave" tour which allows access to undeveloped parts of the cave to more adventurous visitors. It follows the upstream section of the cave, allowing visitors to see all three levels as the original explorers did, continuing beyond where the Discovery Trail ends.

Contents

History

The town's name is derived from its location in a valley bordered by the Blue Mountain Range of the Ozark Mountains. Prior to the founding of Mountain View in 1890, the town of Riggsville, established in 1819 by Thomas Augustus Riggs, existed immediately to the east remaining until after the Civil War, when towns with southern sympathies were to be renamed or moved altogether.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The most studied and written about episode in U.S. history, the Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Mountain View was incorporated on August 14, 1890. [4]

Mountain View was the location of the 1929 trial in the Connie Franklin murder case, in which the "victim" testified.

A tornado on April 14, 1996, rated F4 on the Fujita scale killed NFL quarterback Kurt Warner's mother-in-law and father in-law. Another EF4 tornado caused major damage to the town on February 5, 2008 in the 2008 Super Tuesday tornado outbreak, the deadliest tornado outbreak in two decades.

The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita–Pearson scale, is a scale for rating tornado intensity, based primarily on the damage tornadoes inflict on human-built structures and vegetation. The official Fujita scale category is determined by meteorologists and engineers after a ground or aerial damage survey, or both; and depending on the circumstances, ground-swirl patterns, weather radar data, witness testimonies, media reports and damage imagery, as well as photogrammetry or videogrammetry if motion picture recording is available. The Fujita scale was replaced with the Enhanced Fujita scale (EF-Scale) in the United States in February 2007. In April 2013, Canada adopted the EF-Scale over the Fujita scale along with 31 "Specific Damage Indicators" used by Environment Canada (EC) in their ratings.

National Football League Professional American football league

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from early September to late December, with each team playing 16 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, which is usually held in the first Sunday in February, and is played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

Quarterback position in gridiron football

A quarterback, colloquially known as the "signal caller", is a position in American and Canadian football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive team and line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offensive team, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle. The quarterback also touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and is the offensive player that almost always throws forward passes.

Geography

Mountain View is located at 35°51′54″N92°6′31″W / 35.86500°N 92.10861°W / 35.86500; -92.10861 (35.864886, −92.108497). [5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.8 square miles (17.7 km²), of which 6.8 square miles (17.7 km²) is land and 0.15% is water.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Mountain View has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [6]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 99
1900 226
1910 27220.4%
1920 34225.7%
1930 45833.9%
1940 74562.7%
1950 1,04340.0%
1960 983−5.8%
1970 1,86689.8%
1980 2,14715.1%
1990 2,43913.6%
2000 2,87617.9%
2010 2,748−4.5%
Est. 20172,853 [3] 3.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]

As of the census [8] of 2000, there were 2,876 people, 1,287 households, and 792 families residing in the city. The population density was 421.8 people per square mile (162.8/km²). There were 1,450 housing units at an average density of 212.7 per square mile (82.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.97% White, 0.94% Native American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 1.74% from two or more races. 1.70% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,287 households out of which 23.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.4% were non-families. 35.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.13 and the average family size was 2.72.

In the city, the population was spread out with 20.2% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 20.7% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 25.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females, there were 81.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $19,302, and the median income for a family was $27,589. Males had a median income of $20,000 versus $16,790 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,375. About 10.2% of families and 17.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.1% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

The local economy is largely tourism-based. Numerous hotels and restaurants exist to serve travelers who come to visit the nearby Blanchard Springs Caverns, in Fifty-Six, Arkansas, The Ozark Folk Center State Park, and Loco Ropes Treetop Adventure Park. Many others seek the world-renowned trout fishing of the White River, or the excellent camping, hiking and mountain-biking that can be found in the Ozark National Forest. A few live music and variety shows, such as the White River Hoedown, also entertain travelers by mixing contemporary country, gospel and bluegrass music with a bit of local humor. However, the majority of visitors to Mountain View come to attend one of the two major festivals held here every year, and to enjoy the impromptu folk music jam sessions that occur around the courthouse square.

The remainder of the local economy consists mostly of agriculture, specifically the farming of livestock, primarily cattle and chickens. Large-scale industrial activities in the area are overall nonexistent, excepting a few small manufacturing companies. The Stone County Iron Works, a nationally known company that produces iron furniture, fixtures and housewares, is headquartered in Mountain View. Recently, the city has seen expansion of its personal aircraft maintenance and repair industry.

Stone County, along with neighboring Arkansas counties, is a dry county.

Arts and culture

Much of downtown Mountain View's original buildings are built using native stone, giving the courthouse square a distinctive look and feel C. B. Case Motor Company Buillding 002.jpg
Much of downtown Mountain View's original buildings are built using native stone, giving the courthouse square a distinctive look and feel

Annual cultural events

Local festivals play an integral part in Mountain View's economy and culture, and the city is widely know throughout the country for its hospitality, uniqueness and relaxed pace of life. As such, thousands of people travel to Mountain View each year to attend one of these events, and get a taste of Ozark Mountain culture. Often lodging must be secured a year in advance of the two major festivals. Some local estimates say that the city's population has grown to as much as 100,000 during past festivals, though this is likely an exaggeration. Average festival attendance tends to fall between 40,000 and 60,000.

In April, the city hosts the Ozark Folk Festival. A highlight of this festival is an old-fashioned "home-town" parade, which brings out school bands, patriotic veterans groups, show horses, and decorated floats. Numerous folk craft vendors and many impromptu performances of live folk music are also part of the celebration.

During the spring, summer and fall, anytime the weather is nice, people from all over will gather in and around the courthouse square to play and listen to music. Bluegrass mostly, but a wide array of folk, swing, country and gospel can be heard performed by local townsfolk as well as pickers from hundreds of miles away. Small eating establishments on the square serve BBQ, hamburgers, corn dogs, funnel cakes, ice cream, milkshakes, and even beans & cornbread.

During the last weekend of October, thousands attend the Arkansas Bean Fest and Great Championship Outhouse Races. Early Saturday morning, nearly one ton of pinto beans are cooked in large, antique iron kettles that are set up along the west side of the courthouse square. Promptly at noon, a nearly endless amount of free beans and cornbread are served to the gathered crowd. The festival continues with the famous Outhouse Race. Teams from Arkansas and surrounding states push outhouses built on wheels (similar to a go-kart) in a series of races. The overall champion receives the coveted Golden Toilet Seat Trophy. Handmade crafts and folk music play an integral part in this festival as well.

Other local festivals included the Mountain View Bluegrass Festival, held in both mid-March and mid-November; An Old-Fashioned Fourth of July, held on July 3 and 4; and the Ozark Mountain Christmas, held throughout the month of December. The latter festival is especially notable because it features the town Christmas tree lighting and lighting of the downtown square, including the courthouse and other downtown buildings.

The Ozark Folk Center plays host to several events throughout the year, including live concerts by well-known artist such as the Old Crow Medicine Show and Del McCoury, the Arkansas State Fiddle Championships, and workshops teaching banjo, dulcimer, and other folk crafts.

Education

The city hosts a satellite campus of Ozarka College, a two-year institution whose main campus is located in Melbourne, Arkansas. The city is also home to the main campus of the Mountain View School District, a secondary school that also maintains campuses in Timbo, Arkansas and Fox, Arkansas. The school district boundaries are the same as those of Stone County, Arkansas.

Notable people

See also

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References

  1. "Mountain View Arkansas Chamber of Commerce". Mountain View Arkansas Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
  2. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 22, 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  4. "Mountain View, Arkansas". City-Data.com. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. Climate Summary for Mountain View
  7. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  8. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  9. http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=4069.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. "Missy Irvin's Biography". votesmart.org. Retrieved December 6, 2013.
  11. "Dick Powell". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
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