Stone County, Arkansas

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Stone County, Arkansas
Stone County Courthouse 001.jpg
Stone County courthouse in Mountain View
Map of Arkansas highlighting Stone County.svg
Location in the U.S. state of Arkansas
Map of USA AR.svg
Arkansas's location in the U.S.
FoundedApril 21, 1873
Seat Mountain View
Largest cityMountain View
Area
  Total609.43 [1]  sq mi (1,578 km2)
  Land606.59 [1]  sq mi (1,571 km2)
  Water2.84 [1]  sq mi (7 km2), 0.5% [1]
Population (est.)
  (2016)12,539
  Density20/sq mi (8/km2)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5

Stone County is located in the Ozark Mountains in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for rugged, rocky area terrain of the Ozarks. Created as Arkansas's 74th county on April 21, 1873, Stone County has two incorporated cities: Mountain View, the county seat and most populous city, and Fifty-Six. The county is also the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns.

U.S. state constituent political entity sharing sovereignty as the United States of America

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2017. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

Contents

Most of the county is sparsely populated forested Ozark hills; including the northern fifth of the county managed by the United States Forest Service as the Ozark National Forest. The remainder of the county is used for poultry, ranching, and timber production. The White River runs along the eastern boundary of Stone County. The county contains six protected areas in addition to the Ozark National Forest: Blanchard Springs Caverns within the Ozark National Forest, two Natural Areas, two Wildlife Management Areas and the Ozark Folk Center, which preserves and interprets Ozark cultural heritage, especially traditional mountain folk music and crafts. Other features such as log cabins, one-room school houses, community centers, and museums, as well as annual cultural events, preserve the history and culture of Stone County.

United States Forest Service federal forest and grassland administrators

The United States Forest Service (USFS) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that administers the nation's 154 national forests and 20 national grasslands, which encompass 193 million acres (780,000 km2). Major divisions of the agency include the National Forest System, State and Private Forestry, Business Operations, and the Research and Development branch. Managing approximately 25% of federal lands, it is the only major national land agency that is outside the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Broiler industry

The broiler industry is the process by which broiler chickens are reared and prepared for meat consumption.

Ranch Area of land used for raising grazing livestock

A ranch is an area of land, including various structures, given primarily to the practice of ranching, the practice of raising grazing livestock such as cattle or sheep for meat or wool. The word most often applies to livestock-raising operations in Mexico, the Western United States and Western Canada, though there are ranches in other areas. People who own or operate a ranch are called ranchers, cattlemen, or stockgrowers. Ranching is also a method used to raise less common livestock such as elk, American bison or even ostrich, emu, and alpaca.

Stone County occupies 609.43 square miles (1,578.4 km2) and contained a population of 12,394 people in 5,325 households as of the 2010 Census, ranking it 57th in both size and population among the state's 75 counties.

2010 United States Census national census of the United States taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million, as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Geography

Stone County is located in the Ozark Mountains, one of the six ecoregions of Arkansas. The Ozarks are a mountainous subdivision of the U.S. Interior Highlands, and Stone County contains the Springfield Plateau, Salem Plateau, and the relatively steeper Boston Mountains subsets. The county is roughly split along an east-west line near Mountain View, the centrally located county seat, [2] with areas north within the Springfield Plateau, and areas south within the Boston Mountains. Areas along the White River, which forms the county's northeastern boundary, are dissected bluffs of the Salem Plateau rather than riparian floodplains. [3] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 609.43 square miles (1,578.4 km2), of which 606.59 square miles (1,571.1 km2) is land and 2.84 square miles (7.4 km2) (0.5%) is water. [1]

U.S. Interior Highlands mountainous region in the Central United States

The U.S. Interior Highlands is a mountainous region in the Central United States spanning northern and western Arkansas, southern Missouri, eastern Oklahoma, and extreme southeastern Kansas. The name is designated by the United States Geological Survey to refer to the combined subregions of the Ouachita Mountains and the Ozark Plateaus. The U.S. Interior Highlands is one of few mountainous regions between the Appalachians and Rockies.

Boston Mountains

The Boston Mountains is a Level III ecoregion designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. states of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Part of the Ozark Mountains, the Boston Mountains are a deeply dissected plateau. The ecoregion is steeper than the adjacent Springfield Plateau to the north, and bordered on the south by the Arkansas Valley. The Oklahoma portion of the range is locally referred to as the Cookson Hills.

Floodplain Land adjacent to a stream or river which is flooded during periods of high discharge

A floodplain or flood plain is an area of land adjacent to a stream or river which stretches from the banks of its channel to the base of the enclosing valley walls, and which experiences flooding during periods of high discharge. The soils usually consist of levees, silts, and sands deposited during floods. Levees are the heaviest materials and they are deposited first; silts and sands are finer materials.

The county is located approximately 105 miles (169 km) north of Little Rock, 151 miles (243 km) northwest of Memphis, Tennessee, and 278 miles (447 km) southwest of St. Louis, Missouri. [Note 1] Stone County is surrounded by three Ozark counties, Searcy County to the west, Baxter County to the northwest, Izard County to the northeast, and three border counties with the Arkansas River Valley, Van Buren County to the southwest, Cleburne County to the south, and Independence County (which also contains a small piece of the Arkansas Delta) to the east.

Little Rock, Arkansas Capital of Arkansas

Little Rock is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Arkansas. It is also the county seat of Pulaski County. It was incorporated on November 7, 1831, on the south bank of the Arkansas River close to the state's geographic center. The city derives its name from a rock formation along the river, named the "Little Rock" by the French explorer Jean-Baptiste Bénard de la Harpe in the 1720s. The capital of the Arkansas Territory was moved to Little Rock from Arkansas Post in 1821. The city's population was 198,541 in 2016 according to the United States Census Bureau. The six-county Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, AR Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked 78th in terms of population in the United States with 738,344 residents according to the 2017 estimate by the United States Census Bureau.

Memphis, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Memphis is a city located along the Mississippi River in southwestern Shelby County, Tennessee, United States. The 2017 city population was 652,236, making Memphis the 25th largest city in the United States. Greater Memphis is the 42nd largest metropolitan area in the United States, with a population of 1,348,260 in 2017. The city is the anchor of West Tennessee and the greater Mid-South region, which includes portions of neighboring Arkansas and Mississippi. Memphis is the seat of Shelby County, the most populous county in Tennessee. As one of the most historic and cultural cities of the southern United States, the city features a wide variety of landscapes and distinct neighborhoods.

Tennessee State of the United States of America

Tennessee is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the west, and Missouri to the northwest. The Appalachian Mountains dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a 2017 population of 667,560. Tennessee's second largest city is Memphis, which had a population of 652,236 in 2017.

Hydrology

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 5,089
1890 7,04338.4%
1900 8,10015.0%
1910 8,94610.4%
1920 8,779−1.9%
1930 7,993−9.0%
1940 8,6037.6%
1950 7,662−10.9%
1960 6,294−17.9%
1970 6,8388.6%
1980 9,02231.9%
1990 9,7758.3%
2000 11,49917.6%
2010 12,3947.8%
Est. 201612,539 [5] 1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790–1960 [7] 1900–1990 [8]
1990–2000 [9] 2010–2016 [10]

2010 Census

As of the 2010 census, [11] there were 12,394 people, 5,325 households, and 3,590 families residing in the county. The population density was 20 people per square mile (7.9/km²). There were 6,712 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4.3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.8% White, 0.1% Black or African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. 1.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 5,325 households out of which 26.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.4% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 36.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the county, the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 22.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.2 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,380, and the median income for a family was $36,765. [12] Males had a median income of $28,258 versus $25,341 for females. [13] The per capita income for the county was $16,090. About 16.6% of families and 23.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.7% of those under age 18 and 20.6% of those age 65 or over. [14]

2000 Census

Age pyramid Stone County USA Stone County, Arkansas age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid Stone County

As of the 2000 census, [16] there were 11,499 people, 4,768 households, and 3,461 families residing in the county. The population density was 19 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 5,715 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.27% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 0.77% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. 1.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,768 households out of which 26.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.30% were married couples living together, 7.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.40% were non-families. 24.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.20% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 23.60% from 25 to 44, 28.50% from 45 to 64, and 18.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 96.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,209, and the median income for a family was $28,009. Males had a median income of $20,904 versus $16,118 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,134. About 14.10% of families and 18.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.20% of those under age 18 and 12.10% of those age 65 or over.

Culture and contemporary life

Built c. 1930, the Luber School is one of many period structures built using the stone for which the county is named Luber School.jpg
Built c.1930, the Luber School is one of many period structures built using the stone for which the county is named

Media

The county newspaper is the Stone County Leader , a weekly published in Mountain View since 1952. Former newspapers include the Stone County Democrat and Mountain View Herald (1932-1953). Mountain View has also produced several short-lived publications, including the Mountain View News (1905-1906), The Mountain View (1973-1974), and The Ozark Times (1906-1913).

The Stone County Historical Society has published the Heritage of Stone since 1972. Issued twice annually to members and available to the public for individual purchase, the publication covers topics relating to the history and culture of Stone County.

Government

The Stone County Courthouse has been the seat of county government since 1922. Stone County Courthouse 001.jpg
The Stone County Courthouse has been the seat of county government since 1922.

The county government is a constitutional body granted specific powers by the Constitution of Arkansas and the Arkansas Code. The quorum court is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all spending and revenue collection. Representatives are called justices of the peace and are elected from county districts every even-numbered year. The number of districts in a county vary from nine to fifteen, and district boundaries are drawn by the county election commission. The Stone County Quorum Court has nine members. [17] Presiding over quorum court meetings is the county judge, who serves as the chief operating officer of the county. The county judge is elected at-large and does not vote in quorum court business, although capable of vetoing quorum court decisions. [18] [19]

Taxation

Property tax is assessed by the Stone County Assessor annually based upon the fair market value of the property and determining which tax rate, commonly called a millage in Arkansas, will apply. The rate depends upon the property's location with respect to city limits, school district, and special tax increment financing (TIF) districts. This tax is collected by the Stone County Collector between the first business day of March of each year through October 15th without penalty. The Stone County Treasurer disburses tax revenues to various government agencies, such as cities, county road departments, fire departments, libraries, and police departments in accordance with the budget set by the quorum court.

Sales and use taxes in Arkansas are voter approved and collected by the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration. Arkansas's statewide sales and use tax has been 6.5% since July 1, 2013. [20] Stone County has an additional sales and use tax of 1%, which has been in effect since May 1, 1987. Within Stone County, the City of Mountain View has had an additional 2% sales and use tax since September 1, 2005. [21] The Arkansas State Treasurer disburses state tax revenue to counties/cities in accordance with tax rules.

Politics

In Congress, Arkansas has been represented by two Republican senators (John Boozman and Tom Cotton) since January 3, 2015, ending a long history of Democratic hegemony. In the House of Representatives, Stone County is within the Arkansas 1st district, which contains the Arkansas Delta. The Arkansas 1st has been represented by Rick Crawford since 2010.

In the Arkansas Senate, Stone County is within the 18th District, which also contains all of Cleburne and Searcy counties and parts of Faulkner, Fulton, Baxter, Marion, Van Buren, and White counties. [22] The 18th District has been represented by Missy Irvin (R) of Mountain View since 2011.

Presidential elections results
Stone County, Arkansas
vote by party in presidential elections [23]
Year GOP Dem Others
2016 73.75%4,11321.57% 1,2034.68% 261
2012 70.53%3,77625.33% 1,3564.15% 222
2008 66.38%3,53430.02% 1,5983.61% 192
2004 57.45%3,18840.64% 2,2551.91% 106
2000 53.97%2,62342.04% 2,0434.00% 194
1996 34.36% 1,52650.15%2,22715.49% 688
1992 33.18% 1,67252.03%2,62214.78% 745
1988 55.17%2,18643.61% 1,7281.21% 48
1984 57.48%2,32540.89% 1,6541.63% 66
1980 45.11% 1,79349.51%1,9685.39% 214
1976 27.06% 1,01472.54%2,7180.40% 15
1972 67.38%1,98932.45% 9580.17% 5
1968 37.05%98726.20% 69836.75% 979
1964 40.26% 94258.72%1,3741.03% 24
1960 49.36%95946.17% 8974.48% 87
1956 46.14% 65153.58%7560.28% 4
1952 54.95%70044.98% 5730.08% 1
1948 33.56% 64461.80%1,1864.64% 89
1944 47.57% 54951.30%5921.13% 13
1940 38.41% 40660.93%6440.66% 7
1936 32.12% 24867.49%5210.39% 3
1932 18.78% 26179.14%1,1002.09% 29
1928 43.62% 49954.90%6281.49% 17
1924 32.31% 21059.38%3868.31% 54
1920 39.25% 36755.19%5165.56% 52
1916 30.41% 29869.59%6820.00% 0
1912 18.46% 11355.07%33726.47% 162
1908 33.33% 26761.92%4964.74% 38
1904 43.15% 23351.30%2775.56% 30
1900 30.28% 23168.15%5201.57% 12
1896 18.96% 17280.26%7280.77% 7

Communities

Two incorporated cities are located within the county. The largest city and county seat, Mountain View, is relatively centrally located in the oddly-shaped county. Mountain View's population in 2010 was 2,748, marking the first decennial decline since the 1960 Census. Fifty-Six has maintained a stable population under 200 since incorporation. [2]

Stone County has dozens of unincorporated communities and ghost towns within its borders. This is due to early settlers in Arkansas tending to settle in small clusters rather than incorporated towns. For example, communities like Newnata had a post office and dozens of buildings at some point in their history. Other communities are simply a few dwellings at a crossroads that have adopted a common place name over time. Some are officially listed as populated places by the United States Geological Survey, and others are listed as historic settlements.

Unincorporated communities

Historical communities

Townships

Townships in Stone County, Arkansas as of 2010 Stone County Arkansas 2010 Township Map large.jpg
Townships in Stone County, Arkansas as of 2010

Townships in Arkansas are the divisions of a county. Each township includes unincorporated areas; some may have incorporated cities or towns within part of their boundaries. Arkansas townships have limited purposes in modern times. However, the United States Census does list Arkansas population based on townships (sometimes referred to as "county subdivisions" or "minor civil divisions"). Townships are also of value for historical purposes in terms of genealogical research. Each town or city is within one or more townships in an Arkansas county based on census maps and publications. The townships of Stone County are listed below; listed in parentheses are the cities, towns, and/or census-designated place s that are fully or partially inside the township. [24] [25]

  • Arbana (small part of Mountain View)
  • Blue Mountain (most of Mountain View)
  • Bryan
  • Farris
  • Flag
  • Franklin
  • Harris (small part of Mountain View)
  • Jones
  • Liberty
  • Locust Grove
  • Marcella
  • Northwest (Fifty-Six)
  • Optimus
  • Red River
  • Red Stripe
  • Richwoods
  • Roasting Ear
  • Smart
  • Sylamore
  • Timbo
  • Turkey Creek
  • Union
  • Washington
  • Wilson

Infrastructure

Aviation

Mountain View Airport is the only public owned/public use airport in Stone County. Also known as Harry E. Wilcox Memorial Field, the facility is a small, rural general aviation airport with 5,650 annual operations. [26] Stone County also contains one private airfield. [2] The nearest commercial service airport is Clinton National Airport in Little Rock.

Major highways

Highway 5/9/14 pass through the Ozarks north of Mountain View Highway 5, 9 and 14 in Mountain View, AR 003.jpg
Highway 5/9/14 pass through the Ozarks north of Mountain View

Stone County is not served by any Interstate highways nor United States highways; the nearest access to the Interstate system is Interstate 40 (I-40) in Conway. Ten state highways serve the traveling public in the county, varying from short connector routes to long highways traversing the entire county. Highway 5 and Highway 9 are major north-south highways across the Ozarks; each crosses through the county through Mountain Home. The two routes briefly form a concurrency, or overlap, between Mountain Home and Allison.

Highway 14 is a major east-west highway across northern Arkansas, it crosses the county and connects Mountain View and Fifty-Six via an overlap with Highway 5 and Highway 9. Highway 87 connects the communities more directly along a winding alignment. Highway 66 has its eastern terminus in Mountain View, and runs west to Leslie in Searcy County, connecting Mountain View to US Highway 65 (US 65). Highway 263 connects several unincorporated communities in southwestern Stone County. Highway 382 serves as an access for Ozark Folk Center State Park. Highway 58, Highway 74, and Highway 110 pass through the county for a few miles on their way to other destinations.

The county also contains the Sylamore Scenic Byway, an Arkansas Scenic Byway and National Forest Scenic Byway.

Utilities

Entergy Arkansas is the sole provider of electricity in almost all of Stone County, with exceptions in the northern tip (served by North Arkansas Electric Cooperative), south of Mountain View (First Electric Cooperative) and the southwest corner (Petit Jean Electric Cooperative). [27]

Mountain View's downtown water tower is listed on the NRHP Downtown Mountain View, AR 004.jpg
Mountain View's downtown water tower is listed on the NRHP

The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) is responsible for the regulation and oversight of public water systems throughout the state. Stone County contains six community water systems: the City of Fifty-Six Water Department, the City of Mountain View Water Department, Pleasant Grove Water Association, Richwoods Water Association, Sylamore Valley Water Association, and the West Stone County Water Association. Mountain View has the largest direct retail population served (7,295, all in Stone County), followed by West Stone County (4,634, including customers served in adjacent counties), Pleasant Grove Water Association (2,315), and Richwoods Water Association (1,436), with the remaining systems under 600 retail population served. [28] Of the water systems serving Stone County, only Fifty-Six uses groundwater, the Gunter Sandstone Aquifer, though also purchasing water from Big Flat, which pumps from the same aquifer. [29] The City of Mountain View uses the White River, [30] and the remaining systems purchasing treated water from Mountain View. [31] [32] [33] [Note 2]

See also

Notes

  1. Mileages from Stone County to Little Rock, Memphis, and St. Louis are based on highway miles using county seat Mountain View for Stone County. [4]
  2. West Stone County Water Association also purchases water from Community Water Systems, whose source is Greers Ferry Lake. [34]

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Ashley County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,853. The county seat is Hamburg. The county was formed in 1848 from parts of Chicot, Drew and Union counties and named after Chester Ashley. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

Beaver, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Beaver is a town in Carroll County, Arkansas, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 100. The community is located on the White River at the western limits of Table Rock Lake deep in the Ozark Mountains. Located north of Eureka Springs, the small town has been featured in movies for its picturesque scenery. The town is known for the Beaver Bridge, a two-panel suspension bridge over the White River listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Altus, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Altus is a city in Franklin County, Arkansas, United States. Located within the Arkansas River Valley at the edge of the Ozark Mountains, the city is within the Fort Smith metropolitan area. The epicenter of the Altus American Viticultural Area (AVA) within Arkansas Wine Country, the city is home to four wineries. Although founded as a coal mining community, the wine industry has driven the Altus economy since the first vineyards were planted in 1872. The population was 758 at the 2010 census, down from 817 at the 2000 census.

Ozark, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Ozark is a city in Franklin County, Arkansas, United States and one of the county's two seats of government. The community is located along the Arkansas River in the Arkansas River Valley on the southern edge of the Ozark Mountains. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 3,684.

Western Grove, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Western Grove is a town in Newton County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 384 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Harrison Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Pindall, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Pindall is a town in Searcy County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 112 at the 2010 census. The town is said to be named for Governor Xenophon Overton Pindall.

Mountain View, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Mountain View is the largest city in and the county seat of Stone County, Arkansas, United States. Located in the Ozarks, the city has a rich tradition of preserving folk music and culture. Founded in 1873, the city's economy is largely based on tourism related to its title as the "Folk Music Capitol of the World". Mountain View hosts the Arkansas Folk Festival in April, various folk artists at Ozark Folk Center State Park throughout the year, and weekly music gatherings on the courthouse steps that are free and open to the public. The city is also known for outdoors recreation opportunities, including Blanchard Springs Caverns, trout fishing on the White River and the Ozark National Forest.

Ozark, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Ozark, incorporated in 1890, is a city in Christian County, Missouri, United States. The population was 17,820 at the 2010 census. As of 2015, the population was 19,120. It is the county seat of Christian County. Ozark is part of the Springfield, Missouri Metropolitan Area, and is centered along a business loop of U.S. Route 65, where it intersects with Missouri Route 14. Ozark is located south of Springfield and north of Branson.

References

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Coordinates: 35°52′46″N92°08′50″W / 35.87944°N 92.14722°W / 35.87944; -92.14722