Miller County, Arkansas

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Miller County, Arkansas
Miller County Courthouse, Texarkana, AR IMG 6379.jpg
Miller County Courthouse in Texarkana
Map of Arkansas highlighting Miller County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arkansas
Map of USA AR.svg
Arkansas's location within the U.S.
FoundedApril 1, 1820;
recreated December 22, 1874,
following abolishment in 1838
Named for James Miller [1]
Seat Texarkana
Largest cityTexarkana
Area
  Total637.48 [2]  sq mi (1,651 km2)
  Land623.98 [2]  sq mi (1,616 km2)
  Water13.5 [2]  sq mi (35 km2), 2.1% [2]
Population (est.)
  (2016)43,787
  Density68.7/sq mi (26.5/km2)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.millercountyar.org

Miller County is a county located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 43,462. [3] The county seat is Texarkana. [4]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Contents

Miller County is part of the Texarkana, TX-AR, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Texarkana, Texas City in Texas, United States

Texarkana is a city in Bowie County, Texas, United States, located in the Ark-La-Tex region. Located approximately 180 miles (290 km) from Dallas, Texarkana is a twin city with neighboring Texarkana, Arkansas. The population of the Texas city was 37,679 at the 2016 census estimate. The city and its Arkansas counterpart form the core of the Texarkana Metropolitan Statistical Area, encompassing all of Bowie County, Texas, and Miller County, Arkansas. The two cities had a combined population of 67,592 at the 2017 census, and the metropolitan area had a total population of 150,098.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, while the Gulf of Mexico is to the southeast.

Texarkana metropolitan area City in Arkansas & Texas, United States

The Texarkana metropolitan statistical area (MSA), as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget, is a two-county region anchored by the twin cities of Texarkana, Texas, and Texarkana, Arkansas,, and encompassing the surrounding communities in Bowie County, Texas, and Miller County, Arkansas. As of the 2016 census, the MSA had a population of 150,098. Texarkana is a subset of the broader Ark-La-Tex region.

When first formed, Miller County was Arkansas's sixth county, established on April 1, 1820, and named for James Miller, the first governor of the Arkansas Territory. Additionally, Miller County was the first of the state's counties to be formed upon the creation of the Arkansas Territory. The first five — Arkansas, Lawrence, Clark, Hempstead and Pulaski — were formed during Arkansas's days as part of the Missouri Territory. This county was abolished in 1838.

James Miller (general) American politician

James Miller was the first Governor of Arkansas Territory and a brevet brigadier general in the United States Army during the War of 1812. It was during his term as governor, and partly due to his influence, that the territory's capital was moved from Arkansas Post to Little Rock.

Arkansas Territory territory of the USA between 1819-1836

The Territory of Arkansas, initially organized as the Territory of Arkansaw, was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1819, until June 15, 1836, when the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Arkansas. Robert Crittenden was secretary of the Territory from 1819 to 1829 and was de facto governor, preparing the territory for statehood.

Arkansas County, Arkansas County in the United States

Arkansas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,019. Located in the Arkansas Delta, the county has two county seats, De Witt and Stuttgart.

During the Reconstruction era, it was organized again on December 22, 1874 [5] from a portion of neighboring Lafayette County. [6]

Lafayette County, Arkansas County in the United States

Lafayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,645, making it the third-least populous county in Arkansas. The county seat is Lewisville. Lafayette County was formed on October 15, 1827 and named in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette, a French military hero of the American Revolutionary War. It is a dry county; therefore, the sale of alcohol is prohibited.

History

External video
State Line Avenue.jpg
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Texarkana's National Register of Historical Places, (5:49)
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Texarkana's National Register of Historical Places Part 2, (7:11), City of Texarkana, Arkansas

When created in 1820, Miller County included most of the current Miller County, as well as several present-day Texas counties. [Note 1] In 1831 the county seat was located what is the current day Clarksville, Texas.

Clarksville, Texas City in Texas, United States

Clarksville is a city in and county seat of Red River County, Texas, in the United States in the northernmost part of the Piney Woods region of East Texas. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 3,285. It is the county seat of Red River County.

When Arkansas achieved statehood the same year as Texas declared itself an independent republic in 1836, a dispute arose over their common border, with the area in Miller County having representation in both the Arkansas legislature and the Texas congress. In 1837 and 1838, Texas organized Red River and Fannin counties, respectively, in the area. Arkansas attempted to counter by making it a misdemeanor for Miller County residents to hold office in Texas, and then by establishing a county court in Fannin. The attempts were ultimately unsuccessful. In 1845 Texas agreed to annexation by the United States, settling the boundary between Texas and Arkansas. As much of Miller County was lost to Texas, the county was dissolved, with the remaining territory returning to Lafayette County. [8]

The modern Miller County was re-created in 1874 from the parts of Lafayette County lying west and south of the Red River.

Geography

Miller County is located in the southwest corner of Arkansas in the Piney Woods, a temperate coniferous forest. The forests of pine trees initially formed a logging and silviculture industry, though many fields have been cleared from the forest to grow rice, soybeans, corn, and vegetables. [9] The county is also within the Ark-La-Tex region, sharing a tripoint with Texas and Louisiana. The Ark-La-Tex is an economic region anchored by Shreveport, Louisiana, Tyler, Texas, Longview, Texas, and Texarkana. The Red River serves as the northern and eastern boundary of the county, though the watercourse has shifted since the county's reestablishment in 1874. The original Red River continues to serve as the county line between Little River, Hempstead, and Lafayette counties in Arkansas. [10] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Miller County has a total area of 637.48 square miles (1,651.1 km2), of which 623.98 square miles (1,616.1 km2) is land and 13.50 square miles (35.0 km2) (2.1%) is water. [2]

The county is located approximately 143 miles (230 km) southwest of Little Rock, 73 miles (117 km) north of Shreveport, Louisiana, and 204 miles (328 km) east of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex (DFW) in Texas. [Note 2] Miller County is surrounded by three Arkansas counties: Little River County to the north, Hempstead County to the northeast, Lafayette County to the east; two Louisiana parishes: Bossier Parish to the southeast and Caddo Parish, to the south; and two Texas counties to the west: Cass and Bowie.

Ecology

Miller County is within the South Central Plains Level III ecoregion designated by the Environmental Protection Agency. Within the region, the county contains parts of four different Level IV ecoregions. Throughout the South Central Plains, forests are mostly swamp - southern floodplain forest, unlike the oak–hickory–pine forest of higher, better drained forests in adjacent eco-regions.

Along the north and eastern county boundary, the Red River Bottomlands follows the Red River. This eco-region contains floodplains, low terraces, oxbow lakes, meander scars, backswamps, natural levees, and the meandering Red River. Natural vegetation is southern floodplain forest unlike the oak–hickory– pine forest of higher, better drained compared to adjacent forests. However, the region has widely been cleared and drained for agriculture. The Red River is almost continuously turbid; suspended sediment concentrations are usually much higher than in the Saline River or Ouachita River due to land cover, land use, and upstream lithology differences.

South of Texarkana, the Floodplains and Low Terraces eco-region follows the Sulphur River. It contains frequently flooded forested wetlands, natural levees, swales, oxbow lakes, and meander scars. Longitudinal channel gradients are low and are less than in the Ouachita Mountains. North of the low terraces, a small strip of Pleistocene Fluvial Terraces ecoregion contains level, poorly-drained, periodically wet soils underlain by Pleistocene unconsolidated terrace deposits. Loblolly pine and oaks are common and are adapted to the prevailing hydroxeric regime; pastureland and hayland are less extensive. A vertical sequence of terraces occurs. The lowest terrace is nearly flat, clayey, and has extensive hardwood wetlands. Higher terraces become progressively older and more dissected; they are dominated by pine flatwoods, pine savanna, or prairie; flatwood wetlands are less extensive than on the lowest terrace. The mid-level terrace is veneered with windblown silt deposits (loess). Streams tend to be mildly acidic and stained by organic matter. They have more suspended solids, greater turbidity, and higher hardness values than the Tertiary Uplands. [12]

Hydrology

Protected areas

Miller County contains two protected areas: the Sandhills Natural Area owned by the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission (ANHC), and the Sulphur River Wildlife Management Areas (WMA), owned by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC). The Sandhills Natural Area preserves 274 acres (111 ha) of undisturbed sandhill vegetation along rolling hills and sandy soils. [13] It is a home to at least 40 rare species of plants, the most of any ANHC Natural Area. [14] The Sulphur River WMA preserves 16,520 acres (6,690 ha) of bottomland hardwood forest, cypress breaks, oxbow lakes, and bayous along the Red River Valley. Established in the 1950s, the area is open to birding, camping, hunting, fishing, and hiking. Within the WMA, 500 acres (200 ha) is maintained as the Henry Moore Waterfowl Rest Area. [15]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1830 356
1880 9,919
1890 14,71448.3%
1900 17,55819.3%
1910 19,55511.4%
1920 24,02122.8%
1930 30,58627.3%
1940 31,8744.2%
1950 32,6142.3%
1960 31,686−2.8%
1970 33,3855.4%
1980 37,76613.1%
1990 38,4671.9%
2000 40,4435.1%
2010 43,4627.5%
Est. 201643,787 [16] 0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]
1790–1960 [18] 1900–1990 [19]
1990–2000 [20] 2010–2016 [3]

2010 Census

As of the 2010 census, [21] there were 43,462 people, 17,219 households, and 11,685 families residing in the county. The population density was 68 people per square mile (26/km²). There were 19,281 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 71.6% White, 24.5% Black or African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.0% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. 2.4% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 11,685 households out of which 34.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.9% were married couples living together, 17.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 26.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.2 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.6 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,307, and the median income for a family was $47,960. [22] Males had a median income of $41,556 versus $30,417 for females. [23] The per capita income for the county was $19,654. About 14.1% of families and 18.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.1% of those under age 18 and 12.9% of those age 65 or over. [24]

2000 Census

Age pyramid Miller County USA Miller County, Arkansas age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid Miller County

As of the 2000 census, [26] there were 40,443 people, 15,637 households, and 11,086 families residing in the county. The population density was 65 people per square mile (25/km²). There were 17,727 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.02% White, 22.99% Black or African American, 0.63% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.54% from other races, and 1.43% from two or more races. 1.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 15,637 households out of which 34.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.90% were married couples living together, 16.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.10% were non-families. 25.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.50% under the age of 18, 9.70% from 18 to 24, 28.60% from 25 to 44, 22.10% from 45 to 64, and 13.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 95.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,951, and the median income for a family was $36,665. Males had a median income of $33,080 versus $21,376 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,444. About 15.40% of families and 19.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.90% of those under age 18 and 16.50% of those age 65 or over.

Human resources

Education

Educational attainment in Miller County is typical for a rural Arkansas county, with a 2016 study finding 85.5% of Miller County residents over age 25 held a high school degree or higher, in line with Arkansas and national averages of 85.2% and 87.0%, respectively. Miller County's proportion of population holding a bachelor's degree or higher is 14.5%, significantly below the state average of 21.5% and national average of 30.3%. [27]

Primary and secondary education

Public school district boundaries in Miller County as of July 2016 Map of Miller County Public School Districts.png
Public school district boundaries in Miller County as of July 2016

Three public school districts are based in Miller County; the Texarkana Arkansas School District (TASD) is the largest school district in Miller County, with the Fouke School District serving approximately the southern half of the county, and the Genoa Central School District serving a small area sround Genoa between the two larger districts. Successful completion of the curriculum of these schools leads to graduation from Arkansas High School, Fouke High School, or Genoa Central High School respectively. All three high schools offer Advanced Placement (AP) courses and are accredited by the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE). TASD also offers graduation from the Washington Academy Charter School, an alternative public charter school, and Texarkana Area Vocational Center. Arkansas HS offers concurrent credit agreements with nearby University of Arkansas Community College at Hope (UACCH) Texarkana Campus, and is the only school in the county accredited by AdvancED. [28]

Students in the northeast part of Miller County around Garland outside the three Miller County-based districts are within the Lafayette County School District.

Higher education

Miller County contains one institution of higher education, the Texarkana campus of University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, a public community college based in Hope, Arkansas. Texarkana, Texas contains Texas A&M University–Texarkana, a public four-year university with a high percentage of students from Arkansas, and Texarkana College, a community college. Other higher education institutions in the region include Cossatot Community College in De Queen, Arkansas, Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, and several institutions in the vicinity of Shreveport, Louisiana.

Libraries

The Texarkana Public Library is located at 600 West 3rd Street. TPL offers books, e-books, media, reference, youth, business and genealogy services. In Fouke, the Ann & Dewey Fowler Community Library is located at 305 N Snell Street in a restored Victorian house.

Public health

UAMS Southwest in Texarkana Texarkana April 2016 068 (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences regional center).jpg
UAMS Southwest in Texarkana

Miller County's above-average poverty rate indicates a high Medicaid eligibility rate. As of 2012, 32.4% of Miller County was eligible for Medicaid, with 61.7% of children under 19 eligible for ARKids First, a program by the Arkansas Department of Human Services that combines children's Medicaid (ARKids A) and other programs for families with higher incomes (ARKids B). [29] The county's population is significantly above healthy weight, with 54.0% of adults and 38.0% of children/adolescents ranking as overweight or obese, compared to the state averages of 67.1% and 39.3%, respectively. These rates are significantly above national averages of 62.9% and 30.3%, respectively. [30]

The Christus St. Michael Health System and Wadley Regional Medical Center in Texarkana are community hospitals offering acute inpatient care, emergency care, surgery, rehabilitation, therapy, and senior care services. The facilities are both rated Level 3 Trauma Centers by the Arkansas Department of Health. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) offers a family medicine residency program at the UAMS Southwest Area Health Education Center in Texarkana. CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs in Hot Springs is a referral hospital in the region, focusing on neurosurgery, cancer treatment, cardiovascular care, and orthopaedics. [31]

The nearest Level 1 Trauma Center is University Health in Shreveport.

Public safety

The Texarkana Department of district court is held at the Bi-State Justice Building at 100 State Line Avenue Texarkana April 2016 118 (Bi-State Justice Building).jpg
The Texarkana Department of district court is held at the Bi-State Justice Building at 100 State Line Avenue

The Miller County Sheriff's Office is the primary law enforcement agency in the county. The agency is led by the Miller County Sheriff, an official elected by countywide vote every four years.

The county is under the jurisdiction of the 37th District Court, a state district court. [32] State district courts in Arkansas are courts of original jurisdiction for criminal, civil (up to $25,000), small claims, and traffic matters. [33] State district courts are presided over by a full-time District Judge elected to a four-year term by a districtwide election. The judge presides over both the Texarkana Department at 100 North State Line Avenue in Texarkana [32] and the Miller County Department at the Miller County Correctional Facility at 2300 East Street. [34]

Superseding district court jurisdiction is the 8th Judicial Circuit Court South, which covers Miller and Lafayette counties. The 8th Circuit South contains three circuit judges, elected to six-year terms circuitwide. [35] Circuit court is held at the Miller County Courthouse at 400 Laurel Street in Texarkana. [35]

Government

The Miller County Courthouse in Texarkana has been the seat of county government since 1939. Texarkana April 2016 090 (Miller County Courthouse).jpg
The Miller County Courthouse in Texarkana has been the seat of county government since 1939.

The county government is a constitutional body granted specific powers by the Constitution of Arkansas and the Arkansas Code. The quorum court is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all spending and revenue collection. Representatives are called justices of the peace and are elected from county districts every even-numbered year. The number of districts in a county vary from nine to fifteen, and district boundaries are drawn by the county election commission. The Miller County Quorum Court has eleven members. Presiding over quorum court meetings is the county judge, who serves as the chief operating officer of the county. The county judge is elected at-large and does not vote in quorum court business, although capable of vetoing quorum court decisions. [36] [37]

Politics

Since the mid-20th century, Miller County has transitioned from reliably Democratic to steady Republican in national, state and local elections. Miller County was part of the Solid South, a period of Democratic hegemony which began after Reconstruction following the Civil War. This resulted essentially in a one-party system, in which a candidate's victory in Democratic primary elections was tantamount to election to the office itself. The Solid South started to dissolve following the Civil Rights Act in 1964, which is when Miller County's streak of supporting Democratic candidates ended. The county would support every Republican presidential candidate after 1964, with exceptions for fellow Southerners: Alabama Governor George Wallace in 1968, Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter in 1976, and fellow Arkansan Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996. Republican strength has been growing rapidly in Miller County, supporting George Bush with 53 and 58 percent of the vote, supporting Barack Obama’s opponents with 66 and 69 percent of the vote, and supporting Donald Trump with 70.2 percent of the vote. [38]

Presidential elections results
Miller County vote
by party in presidential elections [39]
Year GOP DEM Others
2016 70.19%11,29426.56% 4,2733.26% 524
2012 69.29%10,62229.47% 4,5181.23% 189
2008 65.81%9,91332.32% 4,8691.87% 281
2004 57.56%8,44841.82% 6,1390.62% 91
2000 52.94%7,27645.67% 6,2781.39% 191
1996 38.97% 4,87451.73%6,4699.30% 1,163
1992 36.06% 5,27348.21%7,05015.73% 2,300
1988 56.30%7,11043.05% 5,4370.65% 82
1984 63.43%8,30235.80% 4,6860.76% 100
1980 52.40%6,77046.41% 5,9961.20% 155
1976 41.23% 4,67958.58%6,6480.19% 22
1972 74.53%8,35525.47% 2,8550.00% 0
1968 24.99% 2,66227.49% 2,92947.52%5,062
1964 44.81% 4,25354.68%5,1900.52% 49
1960 38.35% 3,11356.06%4,5505.59% 454
1956 43.13% 4,30754.09%5,4022.78% 278
1952 36.87% 3,13762.72%5,3370.41% 35
1948 10.66% 48862.24%2,85027.10% 1,241
1944 25.24% 97274.60%2,8730.16% 6
1940 15.64% 56383.88%3,0190.47% 17
1936 10.69% 32389.01%2,6890.30% 9
1932 7.61% 32291.57%3,8760.83% 35
1928 39.51% 1,15060.19%1,7520.31% 9
1924 17.28% 39763.56%1,46019.16% 440
1920 33.90% 83662.65%1,5453.45% 85
1916 22.09% 40277.91%1,4180.00% 0
1912 22.40% 33157.24%84620.36% 301
1908 39.20% 72256.19%1,0354.61% 85
1904 45.12% 66651.69%7633.18% 47
1900 45.48% 75951.23%8553.30% 55
1896 34.26% 56565.07%1,0730.67% 11

In Congress, Arkansas has been represented by two Republican senators (John Boozman and Tom Cotton) since January 3, 2015, ending a long history of Democratic hegemony. In the House of Representatives, Miller County is within the Arkansas 4th district, which contains Southwest Arkansas, the Arkansas River Valley, and a few Ozark counties. The Arkansas 4th has been represented by Bruce Westerman since 2014.

In the Arkansas Senate, Miller County is within the 11th District. The district also contains Little River and Lafayette counties, and parts of Hempstead and Sevier counties. The 11th has been represented by Jimmy Hickey Jr. (R) of Texarkana since 2013. In the Arkansas House of Representatives, Miller County contains two Districts. The 1st District is almost coterminal with Texarkana, with the rest of the county within the 2nd District. The 2nd District also covers most of Lafayette County and parts of Columbia County, including Magnolia. The Texarkana district has been represented by Carol Dalby (R) since 2016, with the 2nd District represented by Lane Jean (R) since 2012. [40]

Miller County has produced some successful politicians, including three longtime members of the U.S. House of Representatives: Mike Ross represented the Arkansas 4th from 2001 to 2013, Walter E. Rogers represented the Texas's 18th from 1951 to 1967, and Max Sandlin represented the Texas 1st from 1997 to 2005. William F. Kirby served as Arkansas Attorney General from 1907 to 1909, Arkansas Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1910 to 1916 and 1926 to 1934, and represented Arkansas in the U.S. Senate from 1916 to 1921.

Taxation

Property tax is assessed by the Miller County Assessor annually based upon the fair market value of the property and determining which tax rate, commonly called a millage in Arkansas, will apply. The rate depends upon the property's location with respect to city limits, school district, and special tax increment financing (TIF) districts. This tax is collected by the Randolph County Collector between the first business day of March of each year through October 15th without penalty. The Miller County Treasurer disburses tax revenues to various government agencies, such as cities, county road departments, fire departments, libraries, and police departments in accordance with the budget set by the quorum court.

Due to Miller County's proximity to Texas, which has no state personal income tax, special taxation exemptions apply to residents with permanent addresses within the city limits of Texarkana. The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration (DFA) requires taxpayers to submit the Texarkana Employee's Withholding Exemption Certificate with their Arkansas tax return. [41] Taxpayers are exempt from Arkansas income tax, and residents of Texarkana, Texas are exempt from Arkansas income tax from any income earned within the city limits of Texarkana, Arkansas. [42]

Sales and use taxes in Arkansas are voter approved and collected by the DFA. Arkansas's statewide sales and use tax has been 6.5% since July 1, 2013. [43] Miller County has an additional sales and use tax of 1.25%, which has been in effect since October 1, 2012. Within Miller County, the City of Texarkana has an additional 2.5% sales and use tax since January 1, 2008, and the towns of Fouke and Garland having an additional 1.0% sales and use tax, each since the early 1980s [44] The Arkansas State Treasurer disburses tax revenue to counties/cities in accordance with tax rules.

Communities

City

Towns

Unincorporated communities

The Kiblah School served the Kiblah area from 1927 until 1949 Kiblah School.JPG
The Kiblah School served the Kiblah area from 1927 until 1949

Historical communities

Townships

Townships in Arkansas are the divisions of a county. Each township includes unincorporated areas; some may have incorporated cities or towns within part of their boundaries. Arkansas townships have limited purposes in modern times. However, the United States Census does list Arkansas population based on townships (sometimes referred to as "county subdivisions" or "minor civil divisions"). Townships are also of value for historical purposes in terms of genealogical research. Each town or city is within one or more townships in an Arkansas county based on census maps and publications. The townships of Miller County are listed below; listed in parentheses are the cities, towns, and/or census-designated place s that are fully or partially inside the township. [45] [46]

Infrastructure

Major highways

Utilities

The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) is responsible for the regulation and oversight of public water systems throughout the state. Miller County contains six community water systems: Texarkana Water Utilities (TWU), Fouke Waterworks, Miller County Public Water Authority (PWA), Garland Waterworks, Eastern Cass Water Supply Corporation, and Shady Acres Mobile Home Park. TWU, a joint department between the two Texarkana municipalities, provides drinking water and fire flows on both sides of the state line, including several partner cities in Texas. Its source waters are Lake Millwood in Arkansas and Lake Wright Patman in Texas. [47] Miller County PWA purchases water from TWU, and has the same executive director as of February 2018. [48] The remaining systems have retail populations served under 1,000, and are groundwater systems. [49] [50] [51] [52]

See also

Notes

  1. Bowie, Red River, Lamar, Fannin, Cass, Morris, Titus, Franklin, Hopkins, Delta, and Hunt [7]
  2. Mileages from Miller County to Little Rock, Shreveport, and DFW are based on highway miles using county seat Texarkana, Arkansas for Miller County. [11]

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Randolph County is located between the Ozark Mountains and Arkansas Delta in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for John Randolph, a U.S. senator from Virginia influential in obtaining congressional approval of the Louisiana Purchase, which includes today's Randolph County. Created as Arkansas's 32nd county on October 29, 1835, Randolph County has two incorporated cities, including Pocahontas, the county seat and most populous city. The county is also the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns.

Prairie County, Arkansas County in the United States

Prairie County is located in the Central Arkansas region of the U.S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for the Grand Prairie, a subregion of the Arkansas Delta known for rice cultivation and aquaculture which runs through the county. Created as Arkansas's 54th county in 1846, Prairie County is home to four incorporated towns, including DeValls Bluff, the southern district county seat, and two incorporated cities, including Des Arc, the northern district county seat. The county is also the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns. Occupying 676 square miles (175,000 ha), Prairie County is the median-sized county in Arkansas. As of the 2010 Census, the county's population is 8,715 people in 4,503 households. Based on population, the county is the ninth-smallest county of the 75 in Arkansas.

Monroe County, Arkansas County in the United States

Monroe County is located in the Arkansas Delta in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for James Monroe, the fifth President of the United States. Created as Arkansas's 20th county on November 2, 1829, Monroe County is home to two incorporated town and three incorporated cities, including Clarendon, the county seat, and Brinkley, the most populous city. The county is also the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns.

Marion County, Arkansas County in the United States

Marion County is located in the Ozark Mountains in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for Francis Marion, the famous "Swamp Fox" of the Revolutionary War. Created as Arkansas's 35th county in 1836, Marion County is home to one incorporated town and four incorporated cities, including Yellville, the county seat. The county is also the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns. The county included part of what is now Searcy County, Arkansas, with many opposing to dividing them, which helped fueled the bloody Tutt-Everett War between 1844 and 1850.

Lincoln County, Arkansas County in the United States

Lincoln County is located between the Arkansas Timberlands and Arkansas Delta in the U.S. state of Arkansas. It is also within the Pine Bluff metro area, and on the outer edge of the Central Arkansas region. The county is named for Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States. Created as Arkansas's 65th county on March 28, 1871, Lincoln County has three incorporated cities, including Star City, the county seat and most populous city. The county contains 46 unincorporated communities and ghost towns, Cane Creek State Park at the confluence of Cane Creek and Bayou Bartholomew, and nine listings on the National Register of Historic Places to preserve the history and culture of the county.

Hot Spring County, Arkansas County in the United States

Hot Spring County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 32,923. The county seat is Malvern. Hot Spring County was formed on November 2, 1829, from a portion of Clark County. It was named for the hot springs at Hot Springs, Arkansas, which were within its boundaries until Garland County was formed in 1874. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county. However, there is no record of this law.

Ashley County, Arkansas County in the United States

Ashley County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,853. The county seat is Hamburg. The county was formed in 1848 from parts of Chicot, Drew and Union counties and named after Chester Ashley. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

Fouke, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Fouke is a city in Miller County, Arkansas, United States. It is part of the Texarkana, Texas - Texarkana, Arkansas Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 859 at the 2010 census. Fouke is located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 71 and Interstate 49 in Miller County, Arkansas. It is 10 miles west of the Red River, 11 miles southeast of Texarkana, and 17 miles north of Louisiana. It received brief widespread attention in the early 1970s due to sightings/claims of a bigfoot-like creature known as the "Fouke Monster," as well as the subsequent fictitious docudrama movie The Legend of Boggy Creek, which played nationwide.

Garland, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Garland, also known as Garland City, is a town in Miller County, Arkansas, United States. It is part of the Texarkana, Texas - Texarkana, Arkansas Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 242 at the 2010 census.

Texarkana, Arkansas City in the United States

Texarkana is a city in Arkansas and the county seat of Miller County. The city is located across the state line from its twin city, Texarkana, Texas. The city was founded at a railroad intersection on December 8, 1873, and was incorporated in Arkansas on August 10, 1880. Texarkana is the principal city of the Texarkana metropolitan area, which is ranked 274th in terms of population in the United States with 150,098 in 2016 according to the United States Census Bureau.

U.S. Route 71 highway in the United States

U.S. Route 71 is a major north–south United States highway that extends for over 1500 miles in the central United States. This original 1926 route has remained largely unchanged by encroaching Interstate highways. Currently, the highway's northern terminus is in International Falls, Minnesota at the Canada–US border, at the southern end of the Fort Frances-International Falls International Bridge to Fort Frances, Ontario. U.S. Route 53 also ends here. On the other side of the bridge, Trans-Canada Highway 11 is an east–west route. US 71's southern terminus is between Port Barre and Krotz Springs, Louisiana at an intersection with U.S. Route 190.

Central Arkansas Metropolitan area in Arkansas, United States

Central Arkansas, also known as the Little Rock metro, designated by the United States Office of Management and Budget as the Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway Metropolitan Statistical Area, is the most populous metro area in the US state of Arkansas. With an estimated 2016 population of 734,622, it is the most populated area in Arkansas. Located at the convergence of Arkansas's other geographic regions, the region's central location make Central Arkansas an important population, economic, education, and political center in Arkansas and the South. Little Rock is the state's capital, and the city is also home to two Fortune 500 companies, Arkansas Children's Hospital, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).

Highway 296 is an east–west state highway in Miller County. The route begins at US Highway 59 (US 59) and US 71 in Texarkana and runs east to US 82 in the eastern part of the county. Highway 296 serves as an arterial street in Texarkana west of US 67, but is decidedly rural in its length east of US 67, passing through sparsely populated wooded areas typical of the Arkansas Timberlands. The highway was created on April 24, 1963, but was extended throughout the 1960s and 1970s during a period which Arkansas's state highway system grew greatly. Highway 296 is maintained by the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department (AHTD).

U.S. Route 82 in Arkansas highway in Arkansas

U.S. Highway 82 in Arkansas is a major east–west arterial highway across the state's lowest tier of counties. It enters Arkansas from Texas, concurrent with US Highway 67, at a junction with US Highway 71 on the border between Texarkana, Texas and Texarkana, Arkansas. The route leaves Arkansas on the Lake Village Bridge over the Mississippi River near Lake Village, crossing into Mississippi.

U.S. Route 71 in Arkansas highway in Arkansas and Texas

U.S. Highway 71 is a U.S. highway that runs from Krotz Springs, LA to the Fort Frances–International Falls International Bridge at the Canadian border. In Arkansas, the highway runs from the Louisiana state line near Doddridge to the Missouri state line near Bella Vista. In Texarkana, the highway runs along State Line Avenue with US 59 and partially runs in Texas. Other areas served by the highway include Fort Smith and Northwest Arkansas.

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Coordinates: 33°19′40″N93°52′38″W / 33.32778°N 93.87722°W / 33.32778; -93.87722