Benton County, Arkansas

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Benton County, Arkansas
Benton County Courthouse, Bentonville, Arkansas.jpg
Flag of Benton County, Arkansas.svg
Flag
Seal of Benton County, Arkansas.svg
Seal
Map of Arkansas highlighting Benton County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arkansas
Map of USA AR.svg
Arkansas's location within the U.S.
FoundedSeptember 30, 1836
Named for Thomas Hart Benton
Seat Bentonville
Largest city Rogers
Area
  Total884 sq mi (2,290 km2)
  Land847 sq mi (2,194 km2)
  Water37 sq mi (96 km2), 4.1%
Population (est.)
  (2016)258,291
  Density261/sq mi (101/km2)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.bentoncountyar.gov

Benton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 221,339, [1] making it the second-most populous county in Arkansas. The county seat is Bentonville. [2] The county was formed on September 30, 1836 and was named after Thomas Hart Benton, a U.S. Senator from Missouri. In 2012, Benton County voters elected to make the county wet, or a non-alcohol prohibition location. [3]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Contents

Benton County is part of the Northwest Arkansas region.

Northwest Arkansas Place in the United States

Northwest Arkansas includes Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers, and Bentonville, the third, fourth, eighth and tenth largest cities in Arkansas. These cities are located within Benton and Washington counties; NWA also includes Madison County, Arkansas.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 884 square miles (2,290 km2), of which 847 square miles (2,190 km2) is land and 37 square miles (96 km2) (4.1%) is water. [4] Most of the water is in Beaver Lake.

Beaver Lake (Arkansas) lake in Arkansas, United States

Beaver Lake is a man-made reservoir in the Ozark Mountains of Northwest Arkansas and is formed by a dam across the White River. Beaver Lake has some 487 miles (784 km) of shoreline. With towering limestone bluffs, natural caves, and a wide variety of trees and flowering shrubs, it is a popular tourist destination. Beaver Lake is the source of drinking water in Northwest Arkansas, which is managed, treated and sold by Beaver Water District.

Adjacent counties

Barry County, Missouri County in the United States

Barry County is a county located in the southwest portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 35,597. Its county seat is Cassville. The county was organized in 1835 and named after William Taylor Barry, a U.S. Postmaster General from Kentucky.

Carroll County, Arkansas County in the United States

Carroll County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,446. The county has two county seats, Berryville and Eureka Springs. Carroll County is Arkansas's 26th county, formed on November 1, 1833, and named after Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last surviving signer of the United States Declaration of Independence.

Madison County, Arkansas County in the United States

Madison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,717. The county seat is Huntsville. The county was formed on September 30, 1836, and named for James Madison, fourth President of the United States.

National protected areas

Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge

Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge in Benton County, Arkansas became the 455th National Wildlife Refuge on March 14, 1989 under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. This 123-acre (0.50 km2) Ozark Mountain refuge, which includes a limestone-solution cave, is located 20 miles (32 km) west of Fayetteville, Arkansas and approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north of U.S. Highway #412.

Pea Ridge National Military Park national military park in Benton County, Arkansas; site of a Union victory in the Civil War (March 8, 1862)

Pea Ridge National Military Park is a United States National Military Park located in northwest Arkansas near the Missouri border. The park protects the site of the Battle of Pea Ridge, fought March 7 and 8, 1862. The battle was a victory for the Union, and helped it gain control of the crucial border state of Missouri.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1840 2,228
1850 3,71066.5%
1860 9,306150.8%
1870 13,83148.6%
1880 20,32847.0%
1890 27,71636.3%
1900 31,61114.1%
1910 33,3895.6%
1920 36,2538.6%
1930 35,253−2.8%
1940 36,1482.5%
1950 38,0765.3%
1960 36,272−4.7%
1970 50,47639.2%
1980 78,11554.8%
1990 97,49924.8%
2000 153,40657.3%
2010 221,33944.3%
Est. 2017266,300 [5] 20.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790–1960 [7] 1900–1990 [8]
1990–2000 [9] 2010–2016 [1]
Age pyramid Benton County USA Benton County, Arkansas age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid Benton County

As of the 2000 United States Census, [11] there were 153,406 people, 58,212 households, and 43,484 families residing in the county. The population density was 181 people per square mile (70/km²). There were 64,281 housing units at an average density of 76 per square mile (29/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 90.87% White, 0.41% Black or African American, 1.65% Native American, 1.09% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 4.08% from other races, and 1.82% from two or more races. 8.78% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

2000 United States Census 22nd determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000

The Twenty-second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census. This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

As of 2005 Benton County's population was 81.7% non-Hispanic white, while the percentage of Latinos grew by 60 percent in the time period. Latinos are attracted to the growth of light industrial jobs, home construction and service sector in the county. 1.1% of the population was African-American (perhaps the lowest in all of Arkansas); 1.6% was Native American (the historical presence of the Cherokee Indians live in close proximity to Oklahoma); 1.7% was Asian (there was a large influx of Filipinos, Vietnamese and South Asian immigrants arrived in recent decades) and 0.2% of the population was Pacific Islander. 1.6% reported two or more races, usually not black-white due to a minuscule African-American population. And 12.8% was Latino, but the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce believed the official estimate is underreported and Latinos could well be 20 percent of the population. [12]

There were 58,212 households out of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.00% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.30% were non-families. 21.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.60% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 21.10% from 45 to 64, and 14.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,281, and the median income for a family was $45,235. Males had a median income of $30,327 versus $22,469 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,377. About 7.30% of families and 10.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.80% of those under age 18 and 7.30% of those age 65 or over.

As of the 2010 census, the county population was 221,339. The racial makeup of the county was 76.18% Non-Hispanic white, 1.27% Black or African American, 1.69% Native American, 2.85% Asian, 0.30% Pacific Islander. 15.49% of the population was Hispanic or Latino. [13]

Politically, Benton County is arguably one of the most Republican-Leaning Counties in Arkansas. Benton County has not voted Democrat in a Presidential election since 1948 when a former senator from bordering Missouri, Harry S. Truman won Benton County along with winning Arkansas as a whole. [14]

Economy

Transportation

Major highways

The historic Trail of Tears is on US highways 62 and 71 and connects with U.S. Route 412 in nearby Washington County.

Airports

Rail

The Arkansas and Missouri Railroad parallels US Highways 62 and 71 in the county.

Politics

Like all of the conservative Bible Belt of the Ozarks and Ouachitas, Benton County is strongly Republican; however, it has been such for longer than most of the region. It voted Republican in 1928 and 1944, and the last Democratic presidential nominee to carry the county was Harry S. Truman in 1948, [15] and along with nearby Sebastian County it was one of the few counties in Arkansas to resist the appeal of southern “favorite sonsGeorge Wallace, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton.

Presidential elections results
Benton County vote
by party in presidential elections [16]
Year GOP Dem Others
2016 62.87%60,87128.92% 28,0058.21% 7,948
2012 68.95%54,64628.56% 22,6362.49% 1,975
2008 67.20%51,12430.67% 23,3312.13% 1,618
2004 68.37%46,57130.47% 20,7561.17% 794
2000 64.94%34,83832.21% 17,2772.86% 1,531
1996 51.89%23,74837.59% 17,20510.52% 4,815
1992 48.81%21,12636.45% 15,77414.74% 6,379
1988 71.23%24,29527.55% 9,3991.22% 416
1984 75.90%24,29622.82% 7,3061.27% 408
1980 63.96%18,83031.36% 9,2314.69% 1,379
1976 52.75%12,67047.00% 11,2890.25% 61
1972 77.86%14,62121.74% 4,0830.39% 74
1968 49.94%8,10425.19% 4,08824.87% 4,036
1964 51.25%5,97748.49% 5,6550.26% 30
1960 67.58%7,83231.23% 3,6191.20% 139
1956 63.08%6,50036.33% 3,7440.59% 61
1952 68.83%7,91630.94% 3,5580.23% 26
1948 44.70% 2,91150.38%3,2814.93% 321
1944 53.52%3,30546.33% 2,8610.15% 9
1940 43.86% 1,96254.59%2,4421.54% 69
1936 40.64% 1,67258.77%2,4180.58% 24
1932 24.53% 1,27572.62%3,7752.85% 148
1928 57.29%3,24841.42% 2,3481.29% 73
1924 37.04% 1,69450.58%2,31312.38% 566
1920 39.34% 1,91658.28%2,8382.38% 116
1916 29.39% 1,29370.61%3,1060.00% 0
1912 14.05% 54161.12%2,35324.83% 956
1908 31.77% 1,52763.82%3,0674.41% 212
1904 35.08% 1,20257.30%1,9637.62% 261
1900 26.36% 1,08772.28%2,9801.36% 56
1896 16.05% 68583.15%3,5480.80% 34

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Townships

Townships in Benton County, Arkansas as of 2010 Benton County Arkansas 2010 Township Map large.jpg
Townships in Benton County, Arkansas as of 2010

Note: Most Arkansas counties have names for their townships. Benton County, however, has numbers instead of names.

Townships in Arkansas are the divisions of a county. Each township includes unincorporated areas; some may have incorporated cities or towns within part of their boundaries. Arkansas townships have limited purposes in modern times. However, the United States Census does list Arkansas population based on townships (sometimes referred to as "county subdivisions" or "minor civil divisions"). Townships are also of value for historical purposes in terms of genealogical research. Each town or city is within one or more townships in an Arkansas county based on census maps and publications. The townships of Benton County are listed below; listed in parentheses are the cities, towns, and/or census-designated place s that are fully or partially inside the township. [17] [18]

Township FIPS  code ANSI  code
(GNIS  ID)
Population
center(s)
Pop.
(2010)
Pop.
density
(/mi²)
Pop.
density
(/km²)
Total area
(mi²)
Total area
(km²)
Land area
(mi²)
Land area
(km²)
Water area
(mi²)
Water area
(km²)
Geographic coordinates
Township 1 05-93626 01989186 all of: Garfield, Gateway, Lost Bridge Village, Prairie Creek; parts of: Avoca, Rogers 13,223113.7943.93130.964339.2116.205301.014.75938.23 36°24′44″N93°58′47″W / 36.412328°N 93.979817°W / 36.412328; -93.979817
Township 2 05-93628 01989194 small parts of: Lowell, Rogers, Springdale 14,279150.3358.04111.844289.794.984246.016.86043.67 36°16′50″N93°59′00″W / 36.280449°N 93.983324°W / 36.280449; -93.983324
Township 3 05-93630 01989187 parts of: Lowell, Rogers, Springdale; most of Bethel Heights 20,0371,903.93735.0310.57227.3810.52427.260.0480.1243 36°16′22″N94°07′30″W / 36.272833°N 94.124961°W / 36.272833; -94.124961
Township 4 05-93632 01989188 all of Cave Springs ; most of the following: Lowell, Rogers, Springdale (within Benton County); small parts of Elm Springs 25,596518.70200.2849.693128.749.346127.80.3470.8987 36°16′16″N94°11′33″W / 36.271000°N 94.192603°W / 36.271000; -94.192603
Township 5 05-93634 01989189 part of Rogers 12,7922,873.321,109.454.46011.554.45211.530.0080.02072 36°20′09″N94°08′26″W / 36.335732°N 94.140417°W / 36.335732; -94.140417
Township 6 05-93636 01989190 most of Little Flock; almost half of Avoca; small parts of Bentonville, Pea Ridge, Rogers 14,033671.18259.1520.92954.2120.90854.150.0210.05439 36°22′49″N94°07′44″W / 36.380291°N 94.128869°W / 36.380291; -94.128869
Township 7 05-93638 01989191 most of Pea Ridge; part of Bella Vista; small part of Bentonville 20,317331.80128.1061.597159.561.233158.60.3640.9428 36°27′15″N94°09′13″W / 36.454130°N 94.153613°W / 36.454130; -94.153613
Township 8 05-93640 01989192 part of Bentonville 12,6371,575.69608.438.02820.798.02020.770.0080.02072 36°22′49″N94°12′02″W / 36.380199°N 94.200482°W / 36.380199; -94.200482
Township 9 05-93642 01989193 most of: Bentonville, Centerton; small part of Highfill 31,362638.18246.3649.497128.249.143127.30.3540.9169 36°21′16″N94°16′09″W / 36.354443°N 94.269172°W / 36.354443; -94.269172
Township 10 05-93644 01989195 most of: Bella Vista, Hiwasse 16,402385.73148.9743.848113.642.522110.11.3263.434 36°27′13″N94°18′29″W / 36.453560°N 94.307978°W / 36.453560; -94.307978
Township 11 05-93645 01989196 all of: Cherokee City, Decatur, Gravette, Maysville, Sulphur Springs; small parts of: Centerton, Highfill, Hiwasse 12,27359.1322.83207.804538.2207.558537.60.2460.6371 36°23′37″N94°28′06″W / 36.393573°N 94.468392°W / 36.393573; -94.468392
Township 12 05-93646 01989197 most of Gentry; more than half of Siloam Springs 15,158361.65139.5843.028111.441.913108.61.1152.888 36°14′21″N94°31′22″W / 36.239052°N 94.522847°W / 36.239052; -94.522847
Township 13 05-93647 01989198 all of Springtown; most of Highfill; small parts of: Elm Springs, Gentry, Springdale 13,23094.1336.35141.642366.9140.548364.01.0942.833 36°11′38″N94°24′35″W / 36.193862°N 94.409806°W / 36.193862; -94.409806
Source: "Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: County Subdivisions in Arkansas". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. Archived from the original on May 31, 2014.

Source: "Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division.

See also

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Highfill, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Highfill is a town in Benton County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 583 at the 2010 census. It is home to the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport, which serves all of Northwest Arkansas, including the Bentonville–Fayetteville–Siloam Springs–Springdale–Rogers, AR-MO-OK Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Lowell, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Lowell is a city in Benton County, Arkansas, United States. Located within the Ozarks, first settlement was along Old Wire Road in the 1840s, and although destroyed during the Civil War, the community was reestablished by J. H. McClure and thrived when the St. Louis–San Francisco Railway came through the area in the 1880s. Today, the city is a growing bedroom community within the rapidly growing Northwest Arkansas region. Lowell is also home to the headquarters of trucking company J.B. Hunt. Lowell's population was 7,327 at the 2010 census, an increase of 46% since 2000.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 19, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "Jordan wins in Fayetteville, Benton County goes wet". Archived from the original on March 7, 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2013.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 25, 2015.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved August 25, 2015.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 25, 2015.
  8. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2015.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 25, 2015.
  10. Based on 2000 census data
  11. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. Benton County QuickFacts from the U. S. Census Bureau
  13. "Population estimates, July 1, 2015, (V2015)". www.census.gov. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  14. Leip, David. "1948 Presidential General Election Results".
  15. Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  16. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections" . Retrieved November 18, 2016.
  17. 2011 Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS): Benton County, AR (PDF) (Map). U. S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  18. "Arkansas: 2010 Census Block Maps - County Subdivision". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved June 28, 2014.

Coordinates: 36°21′08″N94°14′03″W / 36.35222°N 94.23417°W / 36.35222; -94.23417