Connecticut's 1st congressional district

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Connecticut's 1st congressional district
Connecticut's 1st congressional district
Connecticut's 1st congressional district
Connecticut's 1st congressional district
Connecticut's 1st congressional district
District boundaries
Representative
  John B. Larson
DEast Hartford
Area673 sq mi (1,740 km2)
Distribution
  • 93.94% urban
  • 6.06% rural
Population (2021)716,422
Median household
income
$79,242 [1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVI D+11 [2]

Connecticut's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Connecticut. Located in the north-central part of the state, the district is anchored by the state capital of Hartford. It encompasses much of central Connecticut and includes towns within Hartford, Litchfield, and Middlesex counties. With a PVI of D+11, it is the most Democratic district in Connecticut.

Contents

Principal cities include: Bristol, Hartford, and Torrington.

The district has been represented by Democrat John B. Larson since 1999.

Towns in the district

Hartford CountyBerlin, Bloomfield, Bristol, East Granby, East Hartford, East Windsor, Glastonbury (part), Granby, Hartford, Hartland, Manchester, Newington, Rocky Hill, Southington, South Windsor, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Windsor, and Windsor Locks.

Litchfield CountyBarkhamsted, Colebrook, New Hartford, Torrington (part), and Winchester.

Middlesex CountyCromwell, Middletown (part), and Portland.

Voter registration

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 30, 2012 [3]
PartyActive VotersInactive VotersTotal VotersPercentage
Democratic 156,78411,392168,17640.39%
Republican 71,9323,34875,28018.08%
Minor Parties301293300.07%
Unaffiliated161,32711,299172,62641.46%
Total390,33426,068416,412100%

Recent presidential elections

Election results from presidential races
YearOfficeResults
2000 President Gore 62–33%
2004 President Kerry 60–39%
2008 President Obama 66–33%
2012 President Obama 63–36%
2016 President Clinton 59–36%
2020 President Biden 63–35%

Recent elections

The district has the lowest Republican voter performance of the five Connecticut house seats. It has been in Democratic hands without interruption since 1957, and for all but six years since 1931.

US House election, 1988
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Barbara B. Kennelly (inc.)176,46377%
Republican Mario Robles, Jr.51,98523%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 228,448100%
US House election, 1990
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Barbara B. Kennelly (inc.)126,56671%
Republican James P. Garvey50,69029%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 177,256100%
US House election, 1992
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Barbara B. Kennelly (inc.)164,73567%
Republican Phillip Steele75,11331%
Concerned Citizens Gary Garneau5,5772%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 245,425100%
US House election, 1994
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Barbara B. Kennelly (inc.)139,63774%
Republican Douglas T. Putnam46,86524%
Concerned Citizens John F. Forry, III3,4052%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 188,907100%
US House election, 1996
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Barbara B. Kennelly (inc.)158,22274%
Republican Kent Sleath53,66624%
Concerned Citizens John F. Forry, III2,0991%
Natural Law Daniel A. Wasielewski1,1491%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 215,136100%
US House election, 1998
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson 97,68158%
Republican Kevin O'Connor69,66841%
Term Limits Jay E. Palmieri, IV9151%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 168,264100%
US House election, 2000
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)151,93272%
Republican Robert Backlund 59,33128%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 211,263100%
US House election, 2002
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)134,69867%
Republican Phil Steele66,96833%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 201,666100%
US House election, 2004
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)197,96473%
Republican John Halstead73,27227%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 271,237100%
US House election, 2006
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)154,53974%
Republican Scott MacLean53,01026%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 207,549100%
US House election, 2008
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)211,56372%
Republican Joe Visconti76,85126%
Green Stephen Fournier7,1992%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 295,613100%
US House election, 2010
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)138,44061%
Republican Ann Brickley84,07637%
Green Kenneth J. Krayeske2,5641%
Socialist Action Christopher Hutchinson9550.42%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 226,035100%
Connecticut 1st Congressional District Election, 2012
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)206,57570%
Republican John Henry Decker82,26228%
Green Michael DeRosa5,7462%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 294,583100%
Connecticut 1st Congressional District Election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)135,82562%
Republican Matthew Corey78,60936%
Green Jeff Russell3,4472%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 217,881100%
Connecticut 1st Congressional District Election, 2016
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)188,28664%
Republican Matthew Corey100,97634%
Green Mike De Rosa6,0312%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 295,293100%
Connecticut 1st Congressional District Election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.)175,08763%
Republican Jennifer Nye96,02435%
Green Tom McCormick3,0291%
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout 274,140100%
Connecticut 1st Congressional District Election, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic John B. Larson (inc.) 222,668 64%
Republican Mary Fay122,11135%
Green Tom McCormick4,4581%
Total votes349,237 100%
Democratic hold
Connecticut 1st Congressional District Election, 2022
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic John Larson (inc.) 149,556 61%
Republican Larry Lazor91,50637%
Green Mary Sanders2,8511%
Total votes243,913 100%
Democratic hold

List of members representing the district

MemberPartyYearsCong
ress
Electoral history
Isaac Toucey - Brady-Handy.jpg
Isaac Toucey
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1837.
Lost re-election.
Joseph Trumbull Connecticut Governor.jpg
Joseph Trumbull
Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
Elected in 1839.
Re-elected in 1840.
Retired.
ThomasSeymour.png
Thomas H. Seymour
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1843.
Retired.
James Dixon - Brady-Handy.jpg
James Dixon
Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1849
29th
30th
Elected in 1845.
Re-elected in 1847.
Retired.
Loren P. Waldo (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
Loren P. Waldo
Democratic March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected in 1849.
Lost re-election.
Charles Chapman (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
Charles Chapman
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1851.
Retired to run for Governor.
James T. Pratt (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
James T. Pratt
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1853.
Lost re-election.
EzraClarkJr.jpg
Ezra Clark Jr.
American March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
35th
Elected in 1855.
Re-elected in 1857.
Lost re-election.
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
DwightLoomis.jpg
Dwight Loomis
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
Elected in 1859.
Re-elected in 1861.
Retired.
MayorHenryCDeming.jpg
Henry C. Deming
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
38th
39th
Elected in 1863.
Re-elected in 1865.
Lost re-election.
Richard D. Hubbard (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Richard D. Hubbard
Democratic March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869
40th Elected in 1867.
Retired.
Julius L. Strong Republican March 4, 1869 –
September 7, 1872
41st
42nd
Elected in 1869.
Re-elected in 1871.
Died.
VacantSeptember 7, 1872 –
December 2, 1872
42nd
Joseph Roswell Hawley - Brady-Handy.jpg
Joseph Roswell Hawley
Republican December 2, 1872 –
March 3, 1875
42nd
43rd
Elected to finish Strong's term.
Re-elected in 1873.
Lost re-election.
GMLanders.jpg
George M. Landers
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Elected in 1875.
Re-elected in 1876.
Retired.
Joseph Roswell Hawley - Brady-Handy.jpg
Joseph Roswell Hawley
Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
46th Elected in 1878.
Retired when elected U.S. Senator.
JohnRBuck.jpg
John R. Buck
Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
47th Elected in 1880.
Lost re-election.
William W. Eaton - Brady-Handy.jpg
William W. Eaton
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
48th Elected in 1882.
Lost re-election.
JohnRBuck.jpg
John R. Buck
Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
49th Elected in 1884.
Lost re-election.
RobertJVance.jpg
Robert J. Vance
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Elected in 1886.
Lost re-election.
WilliamESimonds.jpg
William E. Simonds
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
51st Elected in 1888.
Lost re-election.
LewisSperry.jpg
Lewis Sperry
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1895
52nd
53rd
Elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Lost re-election.
Edward Stevens Henry (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
E. Stevens Henry
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1913
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Retired.
AugustineLonergan.jpg
Augustine Lonergan
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
Lost re-election.
P. Davis Oakey.jpg
P. Davis Oakey
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1917
64th Elected in 1914.
Lost re-election.
AugustineLonergan.jpg
Augustine Lonergan
Democratic March 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1921
65th
66th
Elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
EHartFenn.jpg
E. Hart Fenn
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1931
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Retired.
AugustineLonergan.jpg
Augustine Lonergan
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
72nd Elected in 1930.
Retired when elected to the US Senate
HermanPKopplemann.jpg
Herman P. Kopplemann
Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1939
73rd
74th
75th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
WilliamJMiller.jpg
William J. Miller
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
76th Elected in 1938.
Lost re-election.
HermanPKopplemann.jpg
Herman P. Kopplemann
Democratic January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
77th Elected in 1940.
Lost re-election.
WilliamJMiller.jpg
William J. Miller
Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
78th Elected in 1942.
Lost re-election.
HermanPKopplemann.jpg
Herman P. Kopplemann
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
79th Elected in 1944.
Lost re-election.
WilliamJMiller.jpg
William J. Miller
Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th Elected in 1946.
Lost re-election.
Ribicoff.jpg
Abraham Ribicoff
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
81st
82nd
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Thomasjdodd.jpg
Thomas J. Dodd
Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1957
83rd
84th
Elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Edwin H. May, Jr. (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
Edwin H. May Jr.
Republican January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1959
85th Elected in 1956.
Lost re-election.
Emilio Daddario.jpg
Emilio Q. Daddario
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1971
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
Elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Retired to run for Governor.
WilliamCotter.jpg
William R. Cotter
Democratic January 3, 1971 –
September 8, 1981
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
Elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Died.
VacantSeptember 9, 1981 –
January 11, 1982
97th
Barbarakennelly.jpg
Barbara B. Kennelly
Democratic January 12, 1982 –
January 3, 1999
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
Elected to finish Cotter's term.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired to run for Governor.
John B Larson, Official Portrait, circa 111 - 112th Congress.jpg
John B. Larson
Democratic January 3, 1999 –
Present
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.
The district from 2003 to 2013 Ct01 109.png
The district from 2003 to 2013

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References

  1. "My Congressional District".
  2. "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  3. "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 30, 2012" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 23, 2006. Retrieved October 30, 2012.

Coordinates: 41°55′43″N73°01′03″W / 41.92861°N 73.01750°W / 41.92861; -73.01750