Wazirzada

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Wazirzada (meaning son of Wazir) are descendants of the Grand Wazirs of the Sadduzai Dynasty in Afghanistan. Wazirzadas are Sadozai Durranis; also a sub tribe of Popalzais and therefore belong to the Abdali or Durrani group of Pashtun tribes.

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