Aeromonas veronii

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Aeromonas veronii
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Aeromonadales
Family:
Genus:
Species:
A. veronii
Binomial name
Aeromonas veronii
Hickman-Brenner et al., 1987
Synonyms

Aeromonas culicicola [1]

Aeromonas veronii is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found in fresh water and in association with animals. [2] It can be a pathogen of humans and a beneficial symbiont of leeches. In humans A. veronii can cause diseases ranging from wound infections and diarrhea to septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Humans treated with medicinal leeches after vascular surgery can be at risk for infection from A. veronii and are commonly placed on prophylactic antibiotics. [3] Most commonly ciprofloxacin is used but there have been reports of resistant strains leading to infection. [4] In leeches, this bacterium is thought to function in the digestion of blood, provision of nutrients, or preventing other bacteria from growing.

Gram-negative bacteria group of bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining method of bacterial differentiation

Gram-negative bacteria are bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the gram-staining method of bacterial differentiation. They are characterized by their cell envelopes, which are composed of a thin peptidoglycan cell wall sandwiched between an inner cytoplasmic cell membrane and a bacterial outer membrane.

Bacillus (shape) rod-shaped bacterium (not to be confused with the taxon Bacilli)

A bacillus or bacilliform bacterium is a rod-shaped bacterium or archaeon. Bacilli are found in many different taxonomic groups of bacteria. However, the name Bacillus, capitalized and italicized, refers to a specific genus of bacteria. The name Bacilli, capitalized but not italicized, can also refer to a less specific taxonomic group of bacteria that includes two orders, one of which contains the genus Bacillus. When the word is formatted with lowercase and not italicized, 'bacillus', it will most likely be referring to shape and not to the genus at all. Bacilliform bacteria are also often simply called rods when the bacteriologic context is clear. Sea Bacilli usually divide in the same plane and are solitary, but can combine to form diplobacilli, streptobacilli, and palisades.

Fresh water naturally occurring water with low concentrations of dissolved salts

Fresh water is any naturally occurring water except seawater and brackish water. Fresh water includes water in ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, icebergs, bogs, ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, and even underground water called groundwater. Fresh water is generally characterized by having low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids. Though the term specifically excludes seawater and brackish water, it does include mineral-rich waters such as chalybeate springs.

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Shigellosis Human disease

Shigellosis is an infection of the intestines caused by Shigella bacteria. Symptoms generally start one to two days after exposure and include diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain, and feeling the need to pass stools even when the bowels are empty. The diarrhea may be bloody. Symptoms typically last five to seven days. Complications can include reactive arthritis, sepsis, seizures, and hemolytic uremic syndrome.

<i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> species of bacterium

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Aeromonas hydrophila is a heterotrophic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium mainly found in areas with a warm climate. This bacterium can be found in fresh or brackish water. It can survive in aerobic and anaerobic environments, and can digest materials such as gelatin and hemoglobin. A. hydrophila was isolated from humans and animals in the 1950s. It is the most well known of the species of Aeromonas. It is resistant to most common antibiotics and cold temperatures and is oxidase and indole positive.

<i>Elizabethkingia meningoseptica</i> species of bacterium

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<i>Morganella morganii</i> species of bacterium

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<i>Aeromonas salmonicida</i> species of bacterium

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References

  1. "Genus Aeromonas". List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  2. F. W. Hickman-Brenner; K. L. MacDonald; A. G. Steigerwalt; G. R. Fanning; D. J. Brenner; J. J. Farmer III (1988). "Aeromonas veronii, a new ornithine decarboxylase-positive species that may cause diarrhea". Journal of Clinical Microbiology . 25 (5): 900–906. PMC   266114 . PMID   3584425.
  3. Whitaker, Iain S.; Kamya, Cyril; Azzopardi, Ernest A.; Graf, Joerg; Kon, Moshe; Lineaweaver, William C. (2009-11-01). "Preventing infective complications following leech therapy: Is practice keeping pace with current research?" (PDF). Microsurgery. 29 (8): 619–625. doi:10.1002/micr.20666. ISSN   1098-2752. PMID   19399888.
  4. Patel, Ketan M.; Svestka, Michael; Sinkin, Jeremy; Ruff, Paul (January 2013). "Ciprofloxacin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila infection following leech therapy: A case report and review of the literature". Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery. 66 (1): e20–e22. doi:10.1016/j.bjps.2012.10.002. PMID   23084650.