Flinders Island spotted fever

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Flinders Island spotted fever
Specialty Infectious disease

Flinders Island spotted fever is a condition characterized by a rash in approximately 85% of cases. [1]

Rash

A rash is a change of the human skin which affects its color, appearance, or texture.

Contents

It is associated with Rickettsia honei . [2]

See also

Japanese spotted fever is a condition characterized by a rash that has early macules, and later, in some patients, petechiae.

North Asian tick typhus, also known as Siberian tick typhus, is a condition characterized by a maculopapular rash.

Flinders Island island to the north of Tasmania, Australia

Flinders Island, the largest island in the Furneaux Group, is a 1,367-square-kilometre (528 sq mi) island located in the Bass Strait, northeast of the island of Tasmania. Flinders Island is part of the state of Tasmania, Australia, and is situated 54 kilometres (34 mi) from Cape Portland and it is located on 40° south, a zone known as the Roaring Forties.

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A spotted fever is a type of tick-borne disease which presents on the skin. They are all caused by bacteria of the genus Rickettsia. Typhus is a group of similar diseases also caused by Rickettsia bacteria, but spotted fevers and typhus are different clinical entities.

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References

  1. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. p. 1130. ISBN   1-4160-2999-0.
  2. Unsworth NB, Stenos J, Graves SR, et al. (April 2007). "Flinders Island spotted fever rickettsioses caused by "marmionii" strain of Rickettsia honei, Eastern Australia". Emerging Infect. Dis. 13 (4): 566–73. doi:10.3201/eid1304.050087. PMC   2725950 Lock-green.svg. PMID   17553271.
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