Japanese spotted fever

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Japanese spotted fever
Specialty Infectious disease

Japanese spotted fever (or oriental spotted fever) is a condition characterized by a rash that has early macules, and later, in some patients, petechiae. [1]

Contents

It is caused by Rickettsia japonica . [2] [3]

See also

Flea-borne spotted fever is a condition characterized by a rash of maculopapules or furuncles.

Flinders Island spotted fever is a condition characterized by a rash in approximately 85% of cases.

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Clostridium cocleatum is a Gram-positive and anaerobic bacterium from the genus of Clostridium which has been isolated from the caecal content of a mouse in Miyazaki in Japan.

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Collinsella intestinalis is a Gram-positive and anaerobic bacterium from the genus of Collinsella which has been isolated from human feces in Japan Collinsella intestinalis occur in the human intestine.

Collinsella stercoris is a Gram-positive and anaerobic bacterium from the genus of Collinsella which has been isolated from human feces in Japan.

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References

  1. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. p. 1130. ISBN   1-4160-2999-0.
  2. Mahara F (1997). "Japanese spotted fever: report of 31 cases and review of the literature". Emerging Infect. Dis. 3 (2): 105–11. doi:10.3201/eid0302.970203. PMC   2627607 Lock-green.svg. PMID   9204291.
  3. Inc, GIDEON Informatics; Berger, Dr Stephen (2017). Infectious Diseases of Japan: 2017 edition. GIDEON Informatics Inc. p. 237. ISBN   9781498813846 . Retrieved 11 November 2017.
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