Governor of Victoria

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Governor of Victoria
Badge of the Governor of Victoria.svg
Badge of the Governor
Flag of the Governor of Victoria.svg
Flag of the Governor
Linda Dessau.jpg
Incumbent
Linda Dessau AC

since 1 July 2015
Viceregal
Style Her Excellency the Honourable
Residence Government House, Melbourne
Seat Melbourne
Nominator Premier of Victoria
Appointer Monarch of Australia
on the advice of the Premier
Term length At His Majesty's pleasure
(conventionally 5 years)
Formation22 May 1855
First holder Sir Charles Hotham
Deputy Lieutenant-Governor of Victoria
Website governor.vic.gov.au

The governor of Victoria is the representative of the monarch, King Charles III, in the Australian state of Victoria. The governor is one of seven viceregal representatives in the country, analogous to the governors of the other states, and the governor-general federally.

Contents

The governor is appointed by the monarch on the advice of the premier of Victoria. The governor's role is to represent the Crown in right of Victoria. This role mainly includes performing ceremonial functions, such as opening and dissolving Parliament, appointing the Cabinet, and granting royal assent.

The governor's office and official residence is Government House next to the Royal Botanic Gardens and surrounded by Kings Domain in Melbourne.

The current governor of Victoria is Linda Dessau, Victoria's first female governor. [1]

Powers

In accordance with the conventions of the Westminster system of parliamentary government, the governor nearly always acts solely on the advice of the head of the elected government, the Premier of Victoria. Nevertheless, the governor retains the reserve powers of the Crown, and has the right to dismiss the premier. [2]

Role of governor

The governor of Victoria is appointed by the King of Australia, on the advice of the premier of Victoria, to act as her representative as head of state in Victoria. [3] The governor acts "at the King's pleasure", meaning that the term of the governor can be terminated at any time by the monarch acting upon the advice of the premier.

Since the Australia Acts of 1986, it is the governor, and not the king, who exercises all the powers of the head of state, and the governor is not subject to the direction or supervision of the monarch, but acts upon the advice of the premier. Upon appointment, the governor becomes a viceroy. The governor's main responsibilities fall into three categories – constitutional, ceremonial and community engagement. [3]

Governor's personal standard

The personal standard of the governor of Victoria is the same design as the State Flag of Victoria, but with the blue background replaced by gold, and red stars depicting the Southern Cross. Above the Southern Cross is the Royal Crown.

The current standard has been in place since 1984. Previously, the standard used by Victorian governors after 1870 had been the Union Jack with the Badge of the State of Victoria emblazoned in the centre. [4] Between 1903 and 1953, the Tudor Crown was used on the State Flag and Governor's Standard, and this was changed to the present crown in 1954.

The governor's standard is flown at Government House and on vehicles conveying the governor. The standard is lowered over Government House when the governor is absent from Victoria. [4]

Past and present standards of the governor

There is also a lieutenant-governor and an administrator. The Chief Justice of Victoria is ex officio the Administrator, unless the chief justice is the lieutenant-governor, in which case, the next most senior judge is the administrator. The lieutenant-governor takes on the responsibilities of the governor when that post is vacant or when the governor is out of the state or unable to act. The administrator takes on those duties if both the governor and lieutenant-governor are not able to act for the above reasons.

See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of governor.

The Official Secretary to the Governor of Victoria is the head of the Office of the Governor that supports the Governor of Victoria in carrying out his or her official constitutional and ceremonial duties and community and international engagements. The Official Secretary manages the Office and its administrative and service staff. All staff report to their respective managers, and through them to the Deputy Official Secretary and Official Secretary. The Office also is in charge of maintaining Government House, Melbourne, and its collections as a heritage and community asset of national importance. The Official Secretary is the Victorian nominee on the Council for the Order of Australia. [5]

The Office of the Governor was established under the Public Administration Act 2004 (Vic) as an administrative office within the portfolio of the Department of Premier and Cabinet. The current Official Secretary is Joshua Puls MVO, and the current Deputy Official Secretary (Operations) is Taara Olorenshaw. [5]

Australianisation of the office

As with the other states, until the 1986 Australia Acts, the office of Governor of Victoria was an appointment of the British Foreign Office although local advice was considered and sometimes accepted.

Until the appointment of Victorian-born Sir Henry Winneke in 1974, the Governors of Victoria were British. Since then, governors have been Australian although several were born overseas, namely Dr Davis McCaughey, born in Ireland, came to Australia for work; and Professor David de Kretser, born in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and Alex Chernov, born in Lithuania, both of whom came to Australia while at school.

List of governors of Victoria

Lieutenant-governors

Prior to the separation of the colony of Victoria from New South Wales in 1851, the area was called the Port Phillip District of New South Wales. The governor of New South Wales appointed superintendents of the district. In 1839 Charles La Trobe was appointed superintendent. La Trobe became lieutenant-governor of the new colony of Victoria on separation on 1 July 1851.

Between 1850 and 1861, the governor of New South Wales was titled governor-general of New South Wales, in an attempt to form a federal structure. Until Victoria obtained responsible government in 1855, the governor-general of New South Wales appointed lieutenant-governors to Victoria. [6] On Victoria obtaining responsible government in May 1855, the title of the then incumbent lieutenant-governor, Captain Sir Charles Hotham, became governor.

No.ImageLieutenant-governorFromTo
1 Charleslatrobe.jpg Captain Charles La Trobe 1 July 18515 May 1854
2 Charles Hotham by James Henry Lynch-crop.jpg Captain Sir Charles Hotham KCB RN 22 June 185422 May 1855

Governors

No.ImageGovernorFromToNotes
1 Charles Hotham by James Henry Lynch-crop.jpg Captain Sir Charles Hotham KCB RN 22 May 185531 December 1855 Edward Macarthur was administrator from January to December 1856 [7]
2 Henry Barkly.jpg Sir Henry Barkly GCMG KCB FRS FRGS26 December 185610 September 1863
3 Portrait of Sir Charles Darling 1863 wood engraving.jpg Sir Charles Darling KCB11 September 18637 May 1866 George Carey acted May to August 1866 [8]
4 3rdViscountCanterbury.jpg The Rt Hon. Viscount Canterbury GCMG KCB15 August 18662 March 1873
5 George Bowen b.jpg The Rt Hon. Sir George Bowen GCMG30 July 187322 February 1879
6 GeorgePhipps2ndMarquessOfNormanby.jpg The Most Hon. Marquess of Normanby GCB GCMG PC 29 April 187918 April 1884
7 Henry Loch Vanity Fair 5 July 1894.jpg Sir Henry Brougham Loch GCMG KCB15 July 188415 November 1889
8 Lord Hopetoun 1902.jpg The Right Hon. Earl of Hopetoun KT GCMG GCVO PC28 November 188912 July 1895
9 Brassey1.JPG The Rt Hon. Lord Brassey GCB JP DL TD 25 October 189531 March 1900
10 George Sydenham Clarke.jpg Sir George Clarke KCMG28 September 1901 [9] 24 November 1903
11 Reginald Talbot Vanity Fair 22 July 1897.jpg The Hon. Major-General Sir Reginald Talbot KCB25 April 19046 July 1908
12 Thomas Gibson Carmichael.jpg The Rt Hon. Lord Carmichael GCSI GCIE KCMG DL27 July 190819 May 1911
13 John Fuller.jpg The Rt Hon. Sir John Fuller Bt KCMG24 May 191124 November 1913
14 Arthur Stanley.jpg Sir Arthur Stanley KCMG23 February 191430 January 1920
15 The Earl of Stradbroke in 1915.jpg The Rt Hon. Earl of Stradbroke KCMG CB CVO CBE VD TD24 February 19217 April 1926
16 Lord Somers Governor 1926.jpg The Rt Hon. Lord Somers KCMG DSO MC 28 June 192623 June 1931
17 Lord huntingfield.jpg The Rt Hon. Lord Huntingfield KCMG14 May 19344 April 1939
18 Winston Dugan.jpg The Rt Hon. Major General Lord Dugan GCMG CB DSO17 July 193920 February 1949
19 Sir Dallas Brooks talking with the Governor of West Australia, Sir James Mitchell.jpg General Sir Reginald Dallas Brooks GCMG KCB KCVO DSO18 October 19497 May 1963
20 Major General Sir Rohan Delacombe KCMG KCVO KBE CB DSO8 May 196331 May 1974
21 Sir Henry Winneke (cropped).JPG The Hon. Sir Henry Winneke AC KCMG KCVO OBE QC 1 June 197428 February 1982
22 Rear Admiral Sir Brian Murray KCMG AO 1 March 19823 October 1985
23 The Reverend Dr Davis McCaughey AC18 February 198622 April 1992
24 The Hon. Richard McGarvie AC QC23 April 199223 April 1997
25 The Hon. Sir James Gobbo AC CVO QC24 April 199731 December 2000
26 Bannister and Landy.jpg Mr. John Landy AC CVO MBE 1 January 20017 April 2006
27 David de Kretser Dsc 6787.jpg Professor David de Kretser AC7 April 20067 April 2011
28 Alex Chernov Governor of Victoria.png The Hon. Alex Chernov AC KC8 April 201130 June 2015
29 Linda Dessau.jpg The Hon. Linda Dessau AC1 July 2015Incumbent

Line of succession

There is also a lieutenant-governor and an administrator. The lieutenant-governor takes on the responsibilities of the governor when that post is vacant or when the governor is out of the state or unable to act. The lieutenant-governor is appointed by the governor on the advice of the premier of Victoria. Appointment as lieutenant-governor does not of itself confer any powers or functions. If there is no governor or if the governor is unavailable to act for a substantial period, the lieutenant-governor assumes office as administrator and exercises all the powers and functions of the governor.

If expecting to be unavailable for a short period only, the governor, with the consent of the premier, usually commissions the lieutenant-governor to act as deputy for the governor, performing some or all of the powers and functions of the governor. [10]

The chief justice of Victoria is ex officio the administrator, unless the chief justice is the lieutenant-governor, in which case the next most senior judge is the administrator. The administrator takes on the governor's duties if both the governor and lieutenant-governor are not able to act for the above reasons.

The current lieutenant-governor is James Angus, who was appointed to the role on 12 November 2021 to succeed Ken Lay.

See also

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References

  1. Willingham, Richard (11 February 2015). "Linda Dessau will become Victoria's first female Governor". The Age. Retrieved 12 February 2015.
  2. Constitution of Victoria (1975), Part 1.
  3. 1 2 Role of the governor
  4. 1 2 The Governor's Standard
  5. 1 2 "Office of the Governor". Governor of Victoria. Retrieved 30 July 2021. CC BY icon-80x15.png  This article incorporates text available under the CC BY 4.0 license.
  6. Twomey, Anne (2006). The chameleon Crown: The Queen and her Australian governors. Sydney: The Federation Press. ISBN   978-1-86287-629-3.
  7. Hill, A. J. (1974). "Macarthur, Sir Edward (1789–1872)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Vol. 5. Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 6 January 2013 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  8. McConville, Chris. "Carey, George Jackson (1822–1872)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 26 November 2013 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  9. "No. 27360". The London Gazette . 1 October 1901. p. 6395.
  10. Victoria Online