Perry County, Ohio

Last updated
Perry County
Perry County Courthouse in New Lexington from southwest.jpg
Seal of Perry County Ohio.svg
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Perry County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio in United States.svg
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°44′N82°14′W / 39.74°N 82.24°W / 39.74; -82.24
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Ohio.svg  Ohio
FoundedMarch 1, 1818 [1]
Named for Oliver Hazard Perry
Seat New Lexington
Largest CityNew Lexington
Area
  Total412 sq mi (1,070 km2)
  Land408 sq mi (1,060 km2)
  Water4.5 sq mi (12 km2)  1.1%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2019)
36,134
  Density88/sq mi (34/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 15th
Website www.perrycountyohio.net

Perry County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,058. [2] Its county seat is New Lexington. [3] Founded on March 1, 1818, from parts of Fairfield, Washington and Muskingum counties, it was the 55th county to be formed in Ohio. The county is named for Oliver Hazard Perry, a hero of the War of 1812. [4]

Contents

Perry County is included in the Columbus, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

One of the poorest counties in the state, this is where the lawsuit challenging Ohio's school funding system, DeRolph v. State , began.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 412 square miles (1,070 km2), of which 408 square miles (1,060 km2) is land and 4.5 square miles (12 km2) (1.1%) is water. [5]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 8,429
1830 13,97065.7%
1840 19,34438.5%
1850 20,7757.4%
1860 19,678−5.3%
1870 18,453−6.2%
1880 28,21852.9%
1890 31,15110.4%
1900 31,8412.2%
1910 35,39611.2%
1920 36,0982.0%
1930 31,445−12.9%
1940 31,087−1.1%
1950 28,999−6.7%
1960 27,864−3.9%
1970 27,434−1.5%
1980 31,03213.1%
1990 31,5571.7%
2000 34,0788.0%
2010 36,0585.8%
Est. 201936,134 [6] 0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2019 [2]

2000 census

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 34,078 people, 12,500 households, and 9,350 families living in the county. The population density was 83 people per square mile (32/km²). There were 13,655 housing units at an average density of 33 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.54% White, 0.22% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.09% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. 0.45% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,500 households out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.1% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.2% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,383, and the median income for a family was $40,294. Males had a median income of $31,664 versus $21,147 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,674. About 9.4% of families and 11.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.2% of those under age 18 and 12.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 36,058 people, 13,576 households, and 9,738 families living in the county. [12] The population density was 88.4 inhabitants per square mile (34.1/km2). There were 15,211 housing units at an average density of 37.3 per square mile (14.4/km2). [13] The racial makeup of the county was 97.9% white, 0.3% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.5% of the population. [12] In terms of ancestry, 25.4% were German, 14.9% were Irish, 10.4% were English, and 9.6% were American. [14]

Of the 13,576 households, 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.3% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.3% were non-families, and 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.06. The median age was 38.6 years. [12]

The median income for a household in the county was $42,388 and the median income for a family was $50,489. Males had a median income of $39,305 versus $31,112 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,916. About 14.2% of families and 18.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.4% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over. [15]

Politics

Perry County tends to be a swing county prior to 2016. Donald Trump in 2016 won the largest percentage of votes of any Republican since Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [16]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 67.7%10,22827.4% 4,1384.9% 735
2012 50.8%7,62746.8% 7,0332.4% 360
2008 50.0%7,72147.0% 7,2613.0% 455
2004 51.7%7,85647.8% 7,2570.5% 76
2000 50.2%6,44046.0% 5,8953.8% 493
1996 37.0% 4,60646.8%5,81916.3% 2,022
1992 34.8% 4,71236.7%4,97228.5% 3,863
1988 56.3%6,60242.7% 5,0111.0% 118
1984 65.1%7,54834.2% 3,9610.8% 88
1980 53.8%5,72541.2% 4,3835.1% 540
1976 46.4% 5,63751.6%6,2681.9% 233
1972 62.1%6,71634.5% 3,7283.4% 365
1968 45.0%4,81544.9% 4,81110.1% 1,084
1964 33.3% 3,89566.7%7,816
1960 59.6%7,65840.4% 5,191
1956 64.6%7,51135.4% 4,123
1952 58.5%7,42541.5% 5,275
1948 51.8%5,69247.9% 5,2640.3% 36
1944 59.2%7,33940.8% 5,050
1940 55.5%8,65644.5% 6,953
1936 43.2% 6,82653.9%8,5082.9% 451
1932 49.3%7,22545.9% 6,7144.8% 704
1928 64.4%8,55135.0% 4,6530.6% 75
1924 58.1%7,59228.3% 3,70213.6% 1,771
1920 54.8%7,68542.2% 5,9173.0% 416
1916 47.9%3,95346.7% 3,8605.4% 448
1912 21.6% 1,73939.1%3,14739.3% 3,166 [17]
1908 49.5%4,30444.7% 3,8855.9% 509
1904 60.3%4,88335.2% 2,8464.5% 366
1900 52.6%4,18045.3% 3,5992.1% 170
1896 48.6% 3,98950.1%4,1121.2% 102
1892 47.1% 3,35948.1%3,4304.8% 341
1888 49.2%3,52848.4% 3,4742.4% 175
1884 48.2%3,22246.6% 3,1145.2% 350
1880 42.8% 2,67651.0%3,1876.2% 384
1876 40.2% 2,08454.2%2,8105.5% 287
1872 46.7% 1,90753.2%2,1720.2% 7
1868 46.4% 1,72553.5%1,986
1864 49.5% 1,82450.4%1,859
1860 43.5% 1,60552.8%1,9503.6% 134
1856 37.1% 1,38549.6%1,847

Communities

Map of Perry County, Ohio with municipal and township labels Map of Perry County Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels.PNG
Map of Perry County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Villages

Townships

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

See also

Media

Footnotes

  1. "Ohio County Profiles: Perry County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-06-21. Retrieved 2007-04-28.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. "Perry County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. Retrieved 2007-04-28.[ dead link ]
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  9. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  13. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  14. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  15. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-05-03.
  17. The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 2,220 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 806 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 104 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 36 votes.

Further reading

Coordinates: 39°44′N82°14′W / 39.74°N 82.24°W / 39.74; -82.24

Related Research Articles

Washington County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 61,778. Its county seat is Marietta. The county, the oldest in the state, is named for George Washington.

Noble County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Noble County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,645, making it the third-least populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Caldwell. The county is named for Rep. Warren P. Noble of the Ohio House of Representatives, who was an early settler there.

Muskingum County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Muskingum County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 86,074. Its county seat is Zanesville. Nearly bisected by the Muskingum River, the county name is based on a Delaware American Indian word translated as "town by the river" or "elk's eye".

Morgan County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Morgan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,054, making it the fourth-least populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is McConnelsville. The county was created in 1817 and later organized in 1819. It is named for Daniel Morgan, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.

Monroe County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Monroe County is a county located on the eastern border of the U.S. state of Ohio, across the Ohio River from West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,642, making it the second-least populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Woodsfield. The county was created in 1813 and later organized in 1815.

Licking County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Licking County is a county located in the central portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 166,492. Its county seat is Newark. The county was formed on January 30, 1808 from portions of Fairfield County. It is named for the salt licks that were in the area.

Guernsey County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Guernsey County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 40,087. Its county seat is Cambridge, and it is named for the Isle of Guernsey in the English Channel, from which many of the county's early settlers emigrated.

Coshocton County, Ohio County in Ohio, US

Coshocton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,901. Its county seat is Coshocton. The county lies within the Appalachian region of the state. The county was formed on January 31, 1810 from portions of Muskingum and Tuscarawas Counties and later organized in 1811. Its name comes from the Delaware Indian language and has been translated as "union of waters" or "black bear crossing".

Conesville, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Conesville is a village in Coshocton County, Ohio, United States, along the Muskingum River. The population was 347 at the 2010 census.

Adamsville, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Adamsville is a village in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. The population was 114 at the 2010 census.

Fultonham, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Fultonham is a village in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. The population was 176 at the 2010 census. It was named for postmaster Robert Fulton.

New Concord, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

New Concord is a village in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. The population is 2,491 as of the 2010 census. New Concord is the home of Muskingum University and is served by a branch of the Muskingum County Library System.

Norwich, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Norwich is a village in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. The population was 102 at the 2010 census.

Philo, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Philo is a village in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States, along the Muskingum River. The population was 733 at the 2010 census.

South Zanesville, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

South Zanesville is a village in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States, along the Muskingum River at the mouth of Moxahala Creek. The population was 1,989 at the 2010 census.

Junction City, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Junction City is a village in Perry County, Ohio, United States. The population was 819 at the 2010 census.

Shawnee, Perry County, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Shawnee is a village in Perry County, Ohio, United States. The population was 655 at the 2010 census. It is nine (9) miles south of the county seat of New Lexington.

Somerset, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Somerset is a village in Perry County, Ohio, United States. The population was 1,481 at the 2010 census. It is located 9.5 miles north of the county seat New Lexington and has a dedicated historical district.

Lowell, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Lowell is a village in Washington County, Ohio, United States, along the Muskingum River. The population was 549 at the 2010 census.

Roseville, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Roseville is a village in Muskingum and Perry counties in the U.S. state of Ohio, along Moxahala Creek. The population was 1,852 at the 2010 census. Roseville is served by a branch of the Muskingum County Library System.