Electronic rock

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Electronic rock is a music genre that involves a combination of rock music and electronic music, featuring instruments typically found within both genres. It originates from the late 1960s, when rock bands such as the Doors, Pink Floyd, Yes, and the Moody Blues began incorporating the Moog synthesizer into their sound. Sampling and tape manipulation would also become common with the genre. Electronic rock acts usually fuse elements from other music styles, including punk rock, industrial rock, hip hop, techno, and synth-pop, which has helped spur subgenres such as indietronica, dance-punk, and electroclash. Since the late 2000s, electronic rock has become increasingly popular. [2]

A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions. It is to be distinguished from musical form and musical style, although in practice these terms are sometimes used interchangeably. Recently, academics have argued that categorizing music by genre is inaccurate and outdated.

Rock music is a broad genre of popular music that originated as "rock and roll" in the United States in the early 1950s, and developed into a range of different styles in the 1960s and later, particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom. It has its roots in 1940s and 1950s rock and roll, a style which drew heavily from the genres of blues, rhythm and blues, and from country music. Rock music also drew strongly from a number of other genres such as electric blues and folk, and incorporated influences from jazz, classical and other musical styles. Musically, rock has centered on the electric guitar, usually as part of a rock group with electric bass, drums, and one or more singers. Usually, rock is song-based music usually with a 4/4 time signature using a verse–chorus form, but the genre has become extremely diverse. Like pop music, lyrics often stress romantic love but also address a wide variety of other themes that are frequently social or political.

Electronic music is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means, and that produced using electronics only. Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms. Devices such as the theremin, synthesizer, and computer can produce electronic sounds.

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Characteristics

Being a fusion of rock and electronic, electronic rock features instruments found in both genres, such as synthesizers, mellotrons, electric guitars and drums. Some electronic rock artists, however, often eschew guitar [2] in favor of using technology to emulate a rock sound. Vocals are typically mellow or upbeat, [3] but instrumentals are also common in the genre. [4]

Synthesizer Electronic instrument capable of producing a wide range of sounds

A synthesizer or synthesiser is an electronic musical instrument that generates audio signals that may be converted to sound. Synthesizers may imitate traditional musical instruments such as piano, flute, vocals, or natural sounds such as ocean waves; or generate novel electronic timbres. They are often played with a musical keyboard, but they can be controlled via a variety of other devices, including music sequencers, instrument controllers, fingerboards, guitar synthesizers, wind controllers, and electronic drums. Synthesizers without built-in controllers are often called sound modules, and are controlled via USB, MIDI or CV/gate using a controller device, often a MIDI keyboard or other controller.

Mellotron musical instrument

The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic tape replay keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England, in 1963. It evolved from a similar instrument, the Chamberlin, but could be mass-produced more effectively. The instrument is played by pressing its keys, each of which presses a length of magnetic tape against a capstan, drawing it across a playback head. Then as the key is released, the tape is retracted by a spring to its initial position. Different portions of the tape can be played to access different sounds.

Electric guitar electrified guitar; fretted stringed instrument with a neck and body that uses a pickup to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals

An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, slaps or taps the strings. The pickup generally uses electromagnetic induction to create this signal, which being relatively weak is fed into a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.

Subgenres and other terms

The term "progressive rock" (or "prog rock") was originally coined in the 1960s for music that would otherwise be described as "electronic rock," [4] but the definition of "prog" later narrowed into a specific set of musical conventions - as opposed to a sensibility involving forward-thinking or experimental approaches. [5]

Progressive rock is a broad genre of rock music that developed in the United Kingdom and United States throughout the mid- to late 1960s. Initially termed "progressive pop", the style was an outgrowth of psychedelic bands who abandoned standard pop traditions in favour of instrumentation and compositional techniques more frequently associated with jazz, folk, or classical music. Additional elements contributed to its "progressive" label: lyrics were more poetic, technology was harnessed for new sounds, music approached the condition of "art", and the studio, rather than the stage, became the focus of musical activity, which often involved creating music for listening rather than dancing.

Electronic rock is also associated with industrial rock, synth-pop, dance-punk, indietronica, and new wave, [4] with electroclash, new rave, post-punk revival, post-rock, considered as subgenres. [2] Sometimes, certain other electronic subgenres are fused with rock, like trance and techno, leading to the use of the terms trance rock and techno rock, respectively. [6] [7]

Industrial rock music genre

Industrial rock is an alternative rock genre that fuses industrial music and rock music.

Synth-pop is a subgenre of new wave music that first became prominent in the late 1970s and features the synthesizer as the dominant musical instrument. It was prefigured in the 1960s and early 1970s by the use of synthesizers in progressive rock, electronic, art rock, disco, and particularly the "Krautrock" of bands like Kraftwerk. It arose as a distinct genre in Japan and the United Kingdom in the post-punk era as part of the new wave movement of the late 1970s to the mid-1980s.

Dance-punk is a music genre that emerged in the late 1970s, and is closely associated with the post-punk and new wave movements.

Heavy metal, a major subgenre of rock, is sometimes mixed with electronic and its subgenres, inspiring terms such as electronic metal, electronic dance metal, trance metal and techno metal. [8] [9] [10] [11] [ text–source integrity? ]

Heavy metal is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom. With roots in blues rock, psychedelic rock, and acid rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. The genre's lyrics and performance styles are sometimes associated with aggression and machismo.

Like heavy metal, punk rock has been mixed with electronic music as well, creating subgenres like synthpunk and dance-punk. [12] [13]

Punk rock is a rock music genre that emerged in the mid-1970s in the, United Kingdom. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other forms of what is now known as "proto-punk" music, punk rock bands rejected perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. They typically produced short, fast-paced songs with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment. America followed the UK bands with the likes of The Ramones and eventually L7 vagina displaying groups... The Tube

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Trance is a genre of electronic music that emerged from the British new-age music scene and the early 1990s German techno and hardcore scenes. At the same time trance music was developing in Europe, the genre was also gathering a following in the Indian state of Goa.

Breakbeat is a broad style of electronic or dance-oriented music which utilizes breaks, often sampled from earlier recordings in funk, jazz and R&B, for the main rhythm. Breakbeats have been used in styles such as hip hop, jungle, drum and bass, big beat, hardcore, and UK garage styles.

Electroclash is a genre of music that fuses 1980s electro, new wave and synth-pop with 1990s techno, retro-style electropop and electronic dance music. It emerged in the later 1990s and is often thought of as reaching its peak circa 2002/2003. It was pioneered by and associated with acts such as I-F, Miss Kittin and The Hacker and Fischerspooner.

Electro is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808 drum machines, and funk. Records in the genre typically feature drum machines and heavy electronic sounds, usually without vocals, although if vocals are present they are delivered in a deadpan manner, often through electronic distortion such as vocoding and talkboxing. This is the main distinction between electro and previously prominent genres such as disco, in which the electronic sound was only part of the instrumentation. It also palpably deviates from its predecessor boogie for being less vocal-oriented and more focused on electronic beats produced by drum machines.

Progressive house is a style (subgenre) of house music. The progressive house style emerged in the early 1990s. It initially developed in the United Kingdom as a natural progression of American and European house music of the late 1980s.

Neo-progressive rock is a subgenre of progressive rock which developed in the UK in the early 1980s. The genre's most popular band, Marillion, achieved mainstream success in the decade. Several bands from the genre have continued to record and tour.

Electronic dance music (EDM), also known as dance music, club music, or simply dance, is a broad range of percussive electronic music genres made largely for nightclubs, raves and festivals. It is generally produced for playback by disc jockeys who create seamless selections of tracks, called a mix by segueing from one recording to another. EDM producers also perform their music live in a concert or festival setting in what is sometimes called a live PA. In Europe, EDM is more commonly called 'dance music', or simply 'dance'.

Psychedelic music is a wide range of popular music styles and genres influenced by 1960s psychedelia, a subculture of people who used psychedelic drugs such as LSD, psilocybin mushrooms, mescaline and DMT to experience visual and auditory hallucinations, synesthesia and altered states of consciousness. Psychedelic music may also aim to enhance the experience of using these drugs.

Dance music music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing

Dance music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music. While there exist attestations of the combination of dance and music in ancient times, the earliest Western dance music that we can still reproduce with a degree of certainty are the surviving medieval dances. In the Baroque period, the major dance styles were noble court dances. In the classical music era, the minuet was frequently used as a third movement, although in this context it would not accompany any dancing. The waltz also arose later in the classical era. Both remained part of the romantic music period, which also saw the rise of various other nationalistic dance forms like the barcarolle, mazurka, ecossaise, ballade and polonaise.

Electronics in rock music

The use of electronic music technology in rock music coincided with the practical availability of electronic musical instruments and the genre's emergence as a distinct style. Rock music has been highly dependent on technological developments, particularly the invention and refinement of the synthesizer, the development of the MIDI digital format and computer technology.

Electronicore is a fusion genre of metalcore with elements of various electronic music genres, often including trance, electronica, and dubstep. Notable artists of this genre have originated from the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Hong Kong, and Japan.

"Electronic rock" and "synth-rock" are broad labels that describe the use of electronics in rock music. More specifically, it may refer to certain rock subgenres that commonly use synthesizers, such as:

A microgenre is a specialized or niche genre. Historically, they were designed by writers seeking to coin a new style of music by linking together a group of disparate artists. Additionally, genres are sometimes retroactively created by record dealers and collectors as a way to increase the monetary value of certain records. Some of the earliest examples are Northern soul, freakbeat, garage punk, and sunshine pop.

References

  1. 1 2 "Electronic Rock : On the History of Rock Music" . Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 Kearney, Mary Celeste (July 13, 2017). "Gender and Rock". Oxford University Press. Retrieved November 24, 2017 via Google Books.
  3. Macan, Edward (November 24, 1997). "Rocking the Classics: English Progressive Rock and the Counterculture". Oxford University Press. Retrieved November 24, 2017 via Google Books.
  4. 1 2 3 "The ABC's of…Electronic Rock in the Studio: The Doors to Depeche Mode & LCD Soundsystem - SonicScoop". November 19, 2013. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  5. Robinson, Emily (2017). The Language of Progressive Politics in Modern Britain. Palgrave Macmillan UK. p. 117. ISBN   978-1-137-50664-1.
  6. Buckley, Peter (24 November 2017). "The Rough Guide to Rock". Rough Guides. Retrieved 24 November 2017 via Google Books.
  7. Prophet, Elizabeth Clare; Press, Summit University (November 24, 1989). "Year of Prophecy". Summit University Press. Retrieved November 24, 2017 via Google Books.
  8. "10 Current Artists That Effortlessly Blend Metal With Other Genres - Page 2 of 2 - Metal Injection". November 2, 2016. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  9. "IS ELECTRONIC DANCE METAL THE NEXT BIG THING??? - MetalSucks". September 19, 2012. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  10. "30 Second guide to: Trance Metal" . Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  11. "Unearthing The Electronic Metal Underground" . Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  12. Felix, Dr. Stanford (2010). The Complete Idiot's Guide Music Dictionary. DK Publishing. p. 257. ISBN   978-1-101-19809-4.
  13. Rip It Up and Start Again: Post Punk 1978–1984. Simon Reynolds. Faber and Faber Ltd, April 2005, ISBN   0-571-21569-6 (U.S. Edition: Penguin, February 2006, ISBN   0-14-303672-6)