Kh-45

Last updated
A-235 PL-19 Nudol
Type Air-to-surface missile
Anti-ship missile
Place of origin Soviet Union
Service history
Used bySee Users
Production history
Variants See Variants


The Kh-45 "Lightning" was a Soviet hypersonic anti-ship air-to-surface missile project. It was developed as the main armanet for ICD "Raduga"'s T-4 missile carrier bomber. The designers were A. Y. Bereznyak, G. K. Samokhvalov and V. A. Larionov. [1]

Contents

History

The Kh-45 was intended to be carried on the Tu-160, but the integration was cancelled in 1976–77. [2]

Basic tactical and technical characteristics

The Kh-45 weighed 4,500 kg and was 10.8m long. [2]

<! - * Flight altitude, m: on the march - 10-15 on the final segment - 4 ->

<! - * Rocket length, m -

See also

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References

  1. https://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/russia/kh-45.htm
  2. 1 2 Piotr Butowski (February 2016) "‘Blackjack’ Attack." Combat Aircraft Magazine.