R-26 (missile)

Last updated
R-26
Type Intercontinental ballistic missile
Place of originFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Production history
Designed1960-1961
Specifications
Mass87,000 kg (192,000 lb) [1]

PropellantLiquid fuel
Operational
range
12,000 kilometres (6,500 nmi) [1]
Accuracy CEP 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) [1]

The R-26 was a second-generation intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) designed but not deployed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Control system of it was designed at NPO "Electropribor" [2] (Kharkiv, Ukraine). The missile was mistakenly identified as an R-9 Desna and given the NATO reporting name SS-8 Sasin. Within the Soviet Union, it carried the GRAU index 8K66.

Contents

Development

Drawing made by the UK Defence Intelligence from observations and photographs made in a Red Square Military Parade 1964 Defe44-158-appendixA-stitched.jpg
Drawing made by the UK Defence Intelligence from observations and photographs made in a Red Square Military Parade 1964
Montage of a UK Defence Intelligence assessment of the R-26 ICBM. Defe44-158-complete-file-stitched.jpg
Montage of a UK Defence Intelligence assessment of the R-26 ICBM.

Design of the R-26 was initiated to develop a light liquid propellant powered ICBM. Designs received approval in 1960, but prior to flight tests were cancelled by the government in 1962.

The missile was revealed during a Red Square parade in November 1964, where it was misidentified as an R-9 Desna. However, the program had already been cancelled and the error was not rectified.

Operators

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
The Strategic Rocket Forces were to be the only operator of the R-26, but it was cancelled before entry into service.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "R-26 SS-8 Sasin".
  2. Krivonosov, Khartron: Computers for rocket guidance systems