KSR-5

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Tu-16 with KSR-5 under wing Raduga KSR-5 VVS museum.jpg
Tu-16 with KSR-5 under wing
Tu-16K with a missile under each wing Tu-16K.jpg
Tu-16K with a missile under each wing
Tu-16 'Badger-G' with KSR-5 under port wing Tu-16 Badger G.jpg
Tu-16 'Badger-G' with KSR-5 under port wing

The Raduga KSR-5 (NATO reporting name AS-6 Kingfish) was a long-range, air-launched cruise missile and anti ship missile developed by the Soviet Union. It was essentially a scaled down version of the Kh-22 'Kitchen', built to be carried by the less capable Tu-16.

Contents

Variants

The Raduga KSR-5 was developed in variants to be deployed as a land attack missile and an anti-ship missile. The missile was designed to be fitted with either a conventional or nuclear warhead.

Operational history

The Raduga KSR-5 was deployed aboard such Soviet aircraft as the Tupolev Tu-16 'Badger' in Tu-16K-26, Tu-16KSR-2-5, and Tu-16KSR-2-5-11 variants, as well as the Tu-22M Backfire. Post 1991 with the retirement of the Badger, the KSR-5 warstock was converted into supersonic targets.

Operators

Specifications

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