R-2 (missile)

Last updated
R-2
Korolev v'ezd v gorod.jpg
R-2 missile at Korolev City of Moscow region
Type Theatre ballistic missile
Short-range ballistic missile
Place of origin USSR
Service history
In serviceNovember 1951 – 1962
Used by Soviet Union
Production history
Manufacturer Yuzhmash and OKB-1
Specifications
Mass19,632 kg
Length17.70 m
Diameter1.65 m

EngineRD-101
Wingspan3.60 m
PropellantLOX / Alcohol
Operational
range
550–600 km (340–370 mi)
Maximum speed 2175 m/s
Accuracy1.25 km
R-2 R-2 SS-2.svg
R-2

The R-2 Short-range ballistic missile (NATO reporting name SS-2 Sibling, GRAU index 8Zh38) was developed based on the R-1 design. This was an improved version of the German V-2 rocket manufactured by the Soviet Union.

Contents

Description

The R-1 was quickly followed by an evolutionary improvement, the R-2 (SS-2), which had a longer range and at least four major differences in design. The weight was increased by 50%, but the range was more than doubled, to 600 km (370 mi). R-2 had the following major differences from the R-1's (and hence from the V-2's) design: [1]

The first test flight of the R-2 took place in September 1949, and it was accepted for service in November 1951, actually entering service in large numbers around 1953. A grand total of 1,545 R-1 and R-2 missiles were produced.

The R-2 missile was the last Soviet missile based on German designs. While some German influences would clearly remain, Soviet missiles after the R-2 would be based on original designs by the OKB-1 group.

The R-2A geophysical rocket was developed for vertical sounding flights. It carried dogs, monkeys, hamsters, and various high-altitude physics experiments in its nose cone. Two pods performed atmospheric analysis and were ejected from the missile's side to avoid contamination by engine exhaust.

The R-2 design was exported to China, where it was built as the Dongfeng 1.

Operators

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union

See also

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References

  1. Khishchenko, Yu. M. (2000). Первые шаги отечественного ракетостроения учебное пособие по курсу "введение в авиационную и космическую технику" [The first steps of domestic rocket science: A manual on the course "Introduction to Aviation and Space Technology"] (in Russian). Chelyabinsk: SUSU. Archived from the original on 2020-04-19. Retrieved 2020-04-19.