RT-2

Last updated
RT-2
SS-13 Savage
RT-2 (8K98) ICBM in Perm.jpg
Type Intercontinental ballistic missile
Place of origin Soviet Union
Service history
In service1968-1976
Used bySoviet Strategic Rocket Forces
Specifications
Mass45,100 kg (99,400 lb)
Length21.5 m (71 ft)

EngineThree-stage solid propellant
Operational
range
10,186 km
Guidance
system
autonomous inertial guidance
AccuracyMaximum error: 4 km, CEP: 1900 m,
Launch
platform
silo-based

The RT-2 was an intercontinental ballistic missile deployed by the Soviet Union, which was in service from December 1968 [1] until 1976. [2] It was assigned the NATO reporting name SS-13 Savage and carried the GRAU index 8K98. Designed by OKB-1, [1] about 60 were built by 1972.

Contents

History

The RT-2 was the first solid-propellant ICBM in Soviet service, and was a development of the earlier RT-1 series. It was a three-stage inertially-guided missile comparable to the American Minuteman missile. It was armed with a single 600 kiloton warhead and was silo-launched, although a rail-based version was contemplated by Soviet planners. It was deployed in the Yoshkar-Ola missile field.

The Soviets used the two upper stages of the RT-2 to develop the RT-15 mobile IRBM system. The RT-2PM Topol is supposedly a modernized version of the RT-2[ citation needed ]

Operations

The RT-2 was capable of delivering a 1,200 lb (540 kg) class payload to a maximum operational range of approximately 5,500 nautical miles(10,186 km) [3]

Command and Control

A single launch control center (LCC) monitored numbers of launchers. The hardened and dispersed silo concept increased system survivability and provided steady environmental controls from the solid-propellant motors. Headquarters RVSN exercised normal control of the RT-2 missile force, through an intermediate RVSN Army and launch complex headquarters (HCC). A launch complex consisted of an HCC and several LCCs, monitoring numerous underground launchers.

Flight test history

Test Launches

RT-2 Test Launches
DateSystemLocationRange (NM)Note
26 Feb 1966RT-2 ModKapustin Yar

General Characteristics

An RT-2 SS-13 Savage.jpg
An RT-2

Operators

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
The Strategic Rocket Forces were the only operator of the RT-2.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Rocket RT-2P". RKK Energia. Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  2. Zak, Anatoly. "RT-2". RussianSpaceWeb. Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  3. Defense Intelligence Agency: "SS-13 Ballistic Missile System", 8 November 1973, DIA Task No. T74-10-03