Gretna, Virginia

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Gretna, Virginia
South of Henry on Main, Gretna.jpg
Main Street downtown
VAMap-doton-Gretna.PNG
Location of Gretna, Virginia
Coordinates: 36°57′11″N79°21′46″W / 36.95306°N 79.36278°W / 36.95306; -79.36278 Coordinates: 36°57′11″N79°21′46″W / 36.95306°N 79.36278°W / 36.95306; -79.36278
Country United States
State Virginia
County Pittsylvania
Government
  Type Council-Manager
   Mayor R. Keith Motley
Area
[1]
  Total1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
  Land1.67 sq mi (4.32 km2)
  Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation
833 ft (254 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,267
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
1,190
  Density713.00/sq mi (275.25/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
24557
Area code(s) 434
FIPS code 51-33232 [3]
GNIS feature ID1467538 [4]
Website Official website

Gretna is a town in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,267 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Danville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

The Gretna Commercial Historic District and Yates Tavern are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [5] [6]

Geography

Gretna is located at 36°57′11″N79°21′46″W / 36.95306°N 79.36278°W / 36.95306; -79.36278 (36.953190, -79.362769). [7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.1 square miles (2.8 km²), of which, 1.1 square miles (2.8 km²) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) (1.83%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 330
1920 47042.4%
1930 63735.5%
1940 619−2.8%
1950 80329.7%
1960 90012.1%
1970 9869.6%
1980 1,25527.3%
1990 1,3396.7%
2000 1,257−6.1%
2010 1,2670.8%
Est. 20191,190 [2] −6.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

At the 2000 census there were 1,257 people, 569 households, and 326 families living in the town. The population density was 1,172.8 people per square mile (453.6/km²). There were 635 housing units at an average density of 592.5 per square mile (229.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 60.54% White, 38.90% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.16% from other races, and 0.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 0.40%. [3]

Of the 569 households 20.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.6% were married couples living together, 18.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.7% were non-families. 40.4% of households were one person and 22.0% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.06 and the average family size was 2.75.

The age distribution was 18.4% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 21.7% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, and 31.3% 65 or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females there were 74.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 67.9 males.

The median household income was $23,710 and the median family income was $33,611. Males had a median income of $28,158 versus $20,598 for females. The per capita income for the town was $14,397. About 14.4% of families and 19.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.7% of those under age 18 and 20.7% of those age 65 or over.

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  6. "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 5/28/13 through 5/31/13. National Park Service. 2013-06-07.
  7. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.