Pittsylvania County, Virginia

Last updated
Pittsylvania County
Chatham, Virginia (8597834802) (2).jpg
Pittsylvania County Courthouse
Pittsylvania County, Virginia seal.png
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Pittsylvania County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°49′N79°24′W / 36.82°N 79.4°W / 36.82; -79.4
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
Founded1767
Named for William Pitt
Seat Chatham
Largest townChatham
Area
  Total978 sq mi (2,530 km2)
  Land969 sq mi (2,510 km2)
  Water9 sq mi (20 km2)  0.9%
Population
 (2010)
  Total63,506
  Estimate 
(2018) [1]
60,949
  Density65/sq mi (25/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 5th
Website www.pittsylvaniacountyva.gov

Pittsylvania County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,506. [2] Chatham is the county seat.

Contents

Pittsylvania County is included in the Danville, VA Micropolitan Statistical Area. [3]

The largest undeveloped uranium deposit in the United States (7th largest in the world) is located in Pittsylvania County [4] (see Uranium mining in Virginia .)

History

Originally "Pittsylvania" was a name suggested for an unrealized British colony to be located primarily in what is now West Virginia. Pittsylvania County would not have been within this proposed colony, subsequently known as Vandalia.

The county was formed in 1767 from Halifax County. It was named for William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1766 to 1768 and opposed harsh colonial policies.

In 1777 the western part of Pittsylvania County became Patrick Henry County.

Maud Clement's History of Pittsylvania County notes the following: "Despite the settlers' intentions, towns failed to develop for two reasons: the generally low level of economic activity in the area and the competition from plantation settlements already providing the kind of marketing and purchasing services typically offered by a town. Plantation settlements along the rivers, particularly at ferrying points, became commercial centers. The most important for early Pittsylvania was that of Sam Pannill, a Scots-Irishman, who at the end of the eighteenth century, while still a young man, set up a plantation town at Green Hill on the north side of the Staunton River in Campbell County. (Clement 15)"

"Its economy was tobacco-dominated and reliant on a growing slave labor force. It was a county without towns or a commercial center. Plantation villages on the major river thoroughfares were the only centers of trade, until the emergence of Danville. (Clement 23)"

The city of Danville's history up through the antebellum period overall is an expression of the relationship between the town and the planters who influenced its development.

Geography

Loading hay, Blairs, Pittsylvania County, 1939. Marion Post Wolcott Marion Post Wolcott Blairs Virginia.jpeg
Loading hay, Blairs, Pittsylvania County, 1939. Marion Post Wolcott

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 978 square miles (2,530 km2), of which 969 square miles (2,510 km2) is land and 9 square miles (23 km2) (0.9%) is water. [5] It is the largest county in Virginia by land area and second-largest by total area. The county is bounded on the north by the Roanoke River (Staunton River), intersected by the Banister River through the center, and drained by the Dan River on the south. [6]

Districts

The county is divided into seven districts:

Adjacent counties and cities

Virginia Counties

Main Street, Chatham, Pittsylvania County, circa 1922 Chatham Savings Bank Chatham Virginia.jpg
Main Street, Chatham, Pittsylvania County, circa 1922

Virginia Cities

North Carolina Counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 11,579
1800 12,6979.7%
1810 17,17235.2%
1820 21,32324.2%
1830 26,03422.1%
1840 26,3981.4%
1850 28,7969.1%
1860 32,10411.5%
1870 31,343−2.4%
1880 52,58967.8%
1890 59,94114.0%
1900 46,894−21.8%
1910 50,7098.1%
1920 56,49311.4%
1930 61,4248.7%
1940 61,6970.4%
1950 66,0967.1%
1960 58,296−11.8%
1970 58,7890.8%
1980 66,14712.5%
1990 55,655−15.9%
2000 61,74510.9%
2010 63,5062.9%
Est. 201860,949 [1] −4.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2013 [2]

According to the most recent census [11] records, there are 60,949 people, and 26,687 households residing in the county. The population density was 65.5 people per square mile (25/km2). There were 31,656 housing units at an average density of 32 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 76.20% White, 21.50% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. 2.70% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 26,687 households, out of which 30.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.93.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,356. The per capita income for the county was $23,597. About 12.60% of the population were below the poverty line.

Government

Pittsylvania County is governed by an elected seven-member Board of Supervisors. Management of the County is vested in a Board-appointed County Administrator.

Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors [12]
NamePartyFirst ElectionDistrict
 Robert Warren (Chair)Rep2015Chatham-Blairs
 Ronald Scearce (Vice Chair)Rep2015Westover
 Joe DavisRep2015Dan River
 Tim DudleyRep2019Staunton River
 Ben FarmerInd2017Callands-Gretna
 Vic IngramInd2019Tunstall
 Dr. Charles MillerInd2017Banister

There are also five elected Constitutional Officers:

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [13]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 68.2%21,55429.1% 9,1992.7% 845
2012 62.8%19,26335.4% 10,8581.8% 560
2008 61.6%18,73037.5% 11,4151.0% 288
2004 64.5%17,67333.8% 9,2741.7% 470
2000 65.0%15,76032.3% 7,8342.7% 661
1996 55.9%12,12735.4% 7,6818.8% 1,906
1992 52.4%11,46735.1% 7,67512.6% 2,752
1988 63.7%12,22934.4% 6,6121.9% 360
1984 66.1%15,74332.7% 7,7911.2% 290
1980 59.3%12,02237.7% 7,6533.0% 605
1976 51.2%9,17344.3% 7,9294.5% 811
1972 72.3%12,10826.5% 4,4291.2% 200
1968 25.6% 5,09627.3% 5,42747.1%9,367
1964 57.5%7,12042.3% 5,2280.2% 25
1960 47.6% 3,78851.4%4,0891.0% 77
1956 36.8% 2,87053.1%4,13610.1% 788
1952 41.9% 2,89357.6%3,9760.5% 31
1948 20.5% 1,16455.6%3,14923.9% 1,353
1944 25.9% 1,22473.9%3,4920.2% 8
1940 16.3% 72883.3%3,7100.4% 17
1936 13.1% 55686.8%3,6940.1% 5
1932 17.1% 65681.4%3,1241.6% 60
1928 60.6%2,59839.4% 1,688
1924 24.8% 88072.1%2,5633.2% 113
1920 29.8% 1,16269.7%2,7150.5% 19
1916 28.1% 80170.5%2,0121.4% 40
1912 21.7% 52764.2%1,55814.1% 341

Communities

Incorporated Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Unincorporated neighborhoods within incorporated towns

See also

Related Research Articles

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Chatham, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Chatham is a town in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States. It is the county seat of Pittsylvania County. Chatham's population was 1,269 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Danville, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town was originally called Competition, but the name was changed to Chatham by the Virginia General Assembly on May 1, 1852.

Gretna, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Gretna is a town in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,267 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Danville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Hurt, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Hurt is a town in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States. Population was 1,304 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Danville, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Danville, Virginia micropolitan area human settlement in United States of America

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Virginia State Route 41 state highway in Danville and Pittsylvania County in Virginia, United States

State Route 41 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. Known as Franklin Turnpike, the state highway runs 22.5 miles (36.2 km) from SR 360 northeast of Danville to SR 57 in Callands. The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) officially designates the route north of U.S. Route 29 Bus. in Danville as a part of SR 41 but the Franklin Turnpike south and east of this point is signed as SR 41.

Virginia State Route 57 state highway in Virginia, United States

State Route 57 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. The state highway runs 88.70 miles (142.75 km) from SR 8 near Woolwine east to SR 360 near Halifax. SR 57 connects the independent city of Martinsville with Chatham and Halifax, the county seats of Pittsylvania and Halifax counties, respectively. The state highway also connects the city to Fairy Stone State Park.

Virginia State Route 360 highway in Virginia

State Route 360 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. The state highway runs 41.77 miles (67.22 km) from U.S. Route 360, US 58 Business, and SR 293 in Danville east to US 360 and SR 344 near Scottsburg. SR 360 is the old alignment of US 360 through Danville, eastern Pittsylvania County, and Halifax County, including the latter's county seat of Halifax, before the U.S. Highway was moved to its present course mostly concurrent with US 58 via South Boston.

Samuel Calland was born in Scotland, but became an influential landowner and merchant in Colonial Virginia. The town of Callands, Virginia, is named for him.

The Coles Hill uranium deposit is located in Pittsylvania County, Virginia in the Smith River allochthon of southern Virginia. The deposit is located east of US Highway 29 between the towns of Chatham and Gretna, Virginia, divided into a north and south ore body. A part of Virginia's Western Piedmont Province, the uranium deposit is bounded by the Chatham fault to the east, where it borders the Triassic Danville basin. Uranium minerals are found in the footwall of the Chatham fault, in healed fractures where apatite crystallized from high-temperature hydrothermal water in the Leatherwood granite mylonite. The site was discovered during uranium prospecting in the 1970s, inspired by the Ambrosia Lake deposit in Canada, with exploration led by the Marline Oil Corporation.

References

  1. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  3. "Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). Office Of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. Retrieved February 8, 2015.
  4. Shulz, Max (2008, July 26). Virginia Is Sitting on the Energy Mother Lode. The Wall Street Journal. Accessed 27 July 2008.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. Wikisource-logo.svg Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A., eds. (1879). "Pittsylvania"  . The American Cyclopædia .
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  12. "Elected Officials - Pittsylvania County, VA - Official Website". www.pittsylvaniacountyva.gov. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  13. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2 April 2018.

Coordinates: 36°49′N79°24′W / 36.82°N 79.40°W / 36.82; -79.40