Mecklenburg County, Virginia

Last updated
Mecklenburg County
Mecklenburg County Courthouse.JPG
Mecklenburg Seal.jpg
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Mecklenburg County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°41′N78°22′W / 36.68°N 78.37°W / 36.68; -78.37
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
Founded1765
Named for Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Seat Boydton
Largest town South Hill
Area
  Total679 sq mi (1,760 km2)
  Land625 sq mi (1,620 km2)
  Water54 sq mi (140 km2)  7.9%
Population
 (2010)
  Total32,727
  Estimate 
(2020) [1]
30,679
  Density48/sq mi (19/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 5th
Website www.mecklenburgva.com
Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg, the county's namesake Charlotte Mecklenburg.JPG
Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg, the county's namesake

Mecklenburg County is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 32,727. [2] Its county seat is Boydton. [3]

Contents

History

Mecklenburg County was organized on March 1, 1765, having split from Lunenburg County in 1764 as the result of the passage of an act by the Virginia General Assembly. Due to new settlement and population increases in the area, the legislature divided Lunenburg into three counties: Lunenburg, Charlotte County, and Mecklenburg. [4] It was named after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, [5] a British queen of German origin.

The first county government consisted of 13 members: Robert Munford, Richard Witton, John Speed, Henry Delony, Edmund Taylor, Benjamin Baird, John Camp, Thomas Erskine, John Potter, John Cox, Thomas Anderson, John Speed, Jr., and Samuel Hopkins, with Benjamin Baird acting as the first mayor. [4]

Government

Mecklenburg County is governed by a nine-member Board of Supervisors, each elected from a single-member district. They serve as the county's legislative and policy body, enacting laws, ordinances, and taxes. They appoint a county administrator to conduct day-to-day operations. H. Wayne Carter, III is the current county administrator and Judy P. Sheffield is the current assistant county administrator.

The board members are:

Constitutional officers

Under the Virginia Constitution, each county and city in the state must install constitutional officers. Counties under the Traditional Form of Government must install all five officers. The majority of Virginia counties operate under the Traditional Form. Counties with the County Executive Form, Urban County Executive, or County Manager Plan of Government usually install just three (Clerk, Commonwealth Attorney, and Sheriff), opting for a Director of Finance appointed by the Board to take the place of the Commissioner of Revenue and Treasurer. Examples are Fairfax, Henrico and Prince William Counties. These officers are heads of their respective departments. They consist of:

Officers

Education

The county's education department is the Mecklenburg County Public Schools. It is managed by the Board of Education. Paul Nichols is the County Schools Superintendent.

Government and infrastructure

County departments and department heads

Listed below are the County facilities, the department housed in that facility and its head.

State representation

The Virginia Department of Corrections operates the Mecklenburg Correctional Center in unincorporated Mecklenburg County, near Boydton. [6] On August 3, 1998, the male death row moved to its current location, the Sussex I State Prison, from the Mecklenburg Correctional Center. [7]

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [8]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 57.2%9,26642.0% 6,8030.8% 135
2016 55.5%8,28842.1% 6,2852.5% 372
2012 52.9%7,97345.9% 6,9211.2% 183
2008 51.8%7,81747.3% 7,1270.9% 138
2004 57.3%7,31941.4% 5,2931.3% 168
2000 56.6%6,60041.2% 4,7972.2% 257
1996 48.0%4,93342.9% 4,4089.1% 937
1992 49.2%5,40139.0% 4,27311.8% 1,296
1988 63.5%5,88735.3% 3,2751.3% 116
1984 65.7%6,77733.3% 3,4381.0% 101
1980 54.5%4,85342.5% 3,7903.0% 270
1976 50.4%4,42346.5% 4,0763.1% 270
1972 68.6%6,38130.1% 2,8041.3% 124
1968 29.0% 2,75028.1% 2,66742.9%4,061
1964 60.5%4,97639.4% 3,2380.2% 13
1960 42.7% 1,93655.9%2,5331.4% 65
1956 33.8% 1,49845.2%2,00421.0% 932
1952 42.5% 1,89156.7%2,5250.9% 38
1948 16.8% 51369.3%2,11713.9% 423
1944 14.4% 43085.6%2,561
1940 11.4% 30888.5%2,4020.1% 3
1936 6.9% 20293.1%2,7300.1% 2
1932 11.1% 27588.3%2,1880.6% 15
1928 30.9% 78469.1%1,752
1924 14.6% 28684.3%1,6491.1% 21
1920 14.0% 26485.7%1,6190.4% 7
1916 14.4% 22285.3%1,3170.3% 5
1912 14.4% 19178.3%1,0397.3% 97

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 679 square miles (1,760 km2), of which 625 square miles (1,620 km2) is land and 54 square miles (140 km2) (7.9%) is water. [9]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 14,733
1800 17,00815.4%
1810 18,4538.5%
1820 19,7867.2%
1830 20,4773.5%
1840 20,7241.2%
1850 20,630−0.5%
1860 20,096−2.6%
1870 21,3186.1%
1880 24,61015.4%
1890 25,3593.0%
1900 26,5514.7%
1910 28,9569.1%
1920 31,2087.8%
1930 32,6224.5%
1940 31,933−2.1%
1950 33,4974.9%
1960 31,428−6.2%
1970 29,426−6.4%
1980 29,4440.1%
1990 29,241−0.7%
2000 32,28010.4%
2010 32,7271.4%
2020 (est.)30,679 [10] −6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]
1790-1960 [12] 1900-1990 [13]
1990-2000 [14] 2010-2013 [2]

As of the census [15] of 2010, there were 32,727 people, 12,951 households, and 8,962 families residing in the county. The population density was 52 people per square mile (20/km2). There were 17,403 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 59.24% White, 39.08% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. 1.21% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,951 households, out of which 26.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.00% were married couples living together, 14.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.80% were non-families. 27.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.60% under the age of 18, 7.20% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 26.00% from 45 to 64, and 17.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 97.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,380, and the median income for a family was $37,752. Males had a median income of $26,852 versus $19,609 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,171. About 11.60% of families and 15.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.60% of those under age 18 and 17.30% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

Related Research Articles

Baker County, Florida County in Florida, United States

Baker County is a county in the U.S. state of Florida. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,115. Its county seat is Macclenny. The county was founded in 1861 and is named for James McNair Baker, a judge and Confederate Senator.

Greene County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Greene County is a county in Virginia in the eastern United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,403. Its county seat is Stanardsville.

Pittsylvania County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Pittsylvania County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,506. Chatham is the county seat.

Northumberland County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Northumberland County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,330. Its county seat is Heathsville. The county is located on the Northern Neck and is part of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace AVA winemaking appellation.

Lunenburg County, Virginia County in Virginia, United States

Lunenburg County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,914. Its county seat is Lunenburg.

Lancaster County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Lancaster County is a county located on the Northern Neck in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,391. Its county seat is Lancaster.

Halifax County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Halifax County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,241. Its county seat is Halifax.

Greensville County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Greensville County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,243. Its county seat is Emporia.

Dinwiddie County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Dinwiddie County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 28,001. Its county seat is Dinwiddie.

Craig County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Craig County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,190. Its county seat is New Castle.

Charlotte County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Charlotte County is a United States county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Charlotte Court House. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 12,586. Charlotte County is predominately rural with a population density of only 26.5 persons per square mile.

Brunswick County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Brunswick County is a United States county located on the southern border of the Commonwealth of Virginia. This rural county is known as one of the claimants to be the namesake of Brunswick stew.

Bedford County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Bedford County is a United States county located in the Piedmont region of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Bedford, which was an independent city from 1968 until rejoining the county in 2013.

Appomattox County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Appomattox County is a United States county located in the Piedmont region and near the center of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The county is part of the Lynchburg, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area, and its county seat is the town of Appomattox.

Dallas County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Dallas County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas, the state's second-most populous county, and the eighth-most populous in the United States. As of the 2010 U.S. census, the population was 2,368,139; in 2019 it was estimated to have 2,635,516 inhabitants.

Boydton, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Boydton is a town in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, United States. The population was 431 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Mecklenburg County, and it is near Kerr Lake.


The government of Virginia combines the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of authority in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The current Governor of Virginia is Ralph Northam. The State Capitol building in Richmond was designed by Thomas Jefferson, and the cornerstone was laid by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785. Virginia currently functions under the 1971 Constitution of Virginia. It is the Commonwealth's seventh constitution. Under the Constitution, the government is composed of three branches, the legislative, the executive and the judicial.

King William County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

King William County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,935. Its county seat is King William.

Joseph Collier Hutcheson was a Virginia lawyer and member of the Virginia General Assembly representing Brunswick, Lunenburg and Mecklenburg Counties as a state Senator from 1958 until months before his death in 1972. A member of the Byrd Organization, Hutcheson opposed racial integration and was active in the Massive Resistance vowed by U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd after the U.S. Supreme Court decisions in Brown v. Board of Education.

Government of Richmond, Virginia

The government of Richmond, Virginia, headquartered at Richmond City Hall in Downtown Richmond, is organized under the Charter of Richmond, Virginia and provides for a "strong" mayor-council system. The mayor is elected to a four-year term and is responsible for the administration of city government. The Richmond City Council is a unicameral body consisting of nine members, each elected to represent a geographic district. The city of Richmond is located in the 13th Judicial Circuit of Virginia, and its court system consists of a circuit court and four district courts.

References

  1. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. 1 2 Bracey, S. (1977). Life by the Roaring Roanoke, Whittet and Shepperson.
  5. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 204.
  6. "Mecklenburg Correctional Center (male classification/intake institution) Archived 2010-02-05 at the Wayback Machine ." Virginia Department of Corrections. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  7. "Virginia Death Row/Execution Facts." My FOX DC. Tuesday November 10, 2009. Retrieved on August 22, 2010.
  8. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2020-12-09.
  9. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  11. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  12. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  13. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  14. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  15. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.

Coordinates: 36°41′N78°22′W / 36.68°N 78.37°W / 36.68; -78.37