Lancaster County, Virginia

Last updated
Lancaster County
CentralLancasterVA.jpg
Central Lancaster, the county seat, with the county courthouse visible
Map of Virginia highlighting Lancaster County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°43′N76°25′W / 37.71°N 76.41°W / 37.71; -76.41
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
Founded1651
Seat Lancaster
Largest town Kilmarnock
Area
  Total231 sq mi (600 km2)
  Land133 sq mi (340 km2)
  Water98 sq mi (250 km2)  42.4%
Population
 (2010)
  Total11,391
  Estimate 
(2018) [1]
10,783
  Density49/sq mi (19/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 1st
Website www.lancova.com

Lancaster County is a county located on the Northern Neck in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,391. [2] Its county seat is Lancaster. [3]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, a county is an administrative or political subdivision of a state that consists of a geographic region with specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs, respectively.

Northern Neck Region in Virginia, United States

The Northern Neck is the northernmost of three peninsulas on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay in the Commonwealth of Virginia. This peninsula is bounded by the Potomac River on the north and the Rappahannock River on the south. It encompasses the following Virginia counties: Lancaster, Northumberland, Richmond, and Westmoreland.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

Located on the Northern Neck near the mouth of the Rappahannock River, Lancaster County is part of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace wine-growing region recognized by the United States as an American Viticultural Area. Lancaster County is the most densely populated county in the Northern Neck. The largest town in Lancaster County is Kilmarnock, Virginia. The county's area code is '804'.

Rappahannock River river in Virginia, United States

The Rappahannock River is a river in eastern Virginia, in the United States, approximately 195 miles (314 km) in length. It traverses the entire northern part of the state, from the Blue Ridge Mountains in the west where it rises, across the Piedmont to the Fall Line, and onward through the coastal plain to flow into the Chesapeake Bay, south of the Potomac River.

The Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace AVA is an American Viticultural Area in eastern portion of the state of Virginia. Wines made from grapes grown in Westmoreland, King George, Northumberland, Lancaster, and Richmond counties may use this appellation. The area is located on a peninsula of land between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers in the Tidewater region of Virginia and known as the Northern Neck. This provides a climate which features more frost free days than the rest of Virginia. The tip of the Northern Neck is located at the Chesapeake Bay. The hardiness zone is 7b.

Wine alcoholic drink made from grapes

Wine is an alcoholic drink made from fermented grapes. Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol, carbon dioxide, and heat. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir, and the production process. Many countries enact legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine. These typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production. Wines not made from grapes include rice wine and fruit wines such as plum, cherry, pomegranate, currant and elderberry.

History

The historic church of St. Mary's, Whitechapel, in Lancaster County, St. Mary's parish was the birthplace of Mary Ball Washington, mother of George Washington St marys whitechapel.jpg
The historic church of St. Mary's, Whitechapel, in Lancaster County, St. Mary's parish was the birthplace of Mary Ball Washington, mother of George Washington

Lancaster County was established in 1651 from Northumberland and York counties. It was home to Robert King Carter in the 18th century, and remaining buildings from that time include Christ Church and St. Mary's, Whitechapel. Other historic attractions open to the public include the Lancaster Courthouse Historic District including the Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library, Belle Isle State Park, and the Village of Morattico Historic District.

Northumberland County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Northumberland County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,330. Its county seat is Heathsville. The county is located on the Northern Neck and is part of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace AVA winemaking appellation.

York County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

York County is a county in the eastern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in the Tidewater. As of the 2010 census, the population was 65,464. The county seat is the unincorporated town of Yorktown.

Christ Church (Lancaster County, Virginia) United States historic place

Christ Church is a historic Episcopal church at 420 Christ Church Road in Lancaster County, Virginia, north of Irvington. Built in 1732-35, it is notable for its unique Georgian design, and is one of the best-preserved colonial churches in the southern United States. The church is the only colonial Virginia church that still has its original high-backed pews and one of two that has maintained its original three-tiered pulpit.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 231 square miles (600 km2), of which 133 square miles (340 km2) is land and 98 square miles (250 km2) (42.4%) is water. [4]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Adjacent counties

Richmond County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Richmond County is a county located on the Northern Neck in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,254. Its county seat is Warsaw. The rural county should not be confused with the large city and state capital Richmond, Virginia. It was formed in 1692 when the first Rappahannock County was divided to form Richmond County and Essex County.

Middlesex County, Virginia U.S. county in Virginia

Middlesex County is a county located on the Middle Peninsula in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,959. Its county seat is Saluda.

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 5,638
1800 5,375−4.7%
1810 5,5924.0%
1820 5,517−1.3%
1830 4,801−13.0%
1840 4,628−3.6%
1850 4,7081.7%
1860 5,1519.4%
1870 5,3554.0%
1880 6,16015.0%
1890 7,19116.7%
1900 8,94924.4%
1910 9,7529.0%
1920 9,7570.1%
1930 8,896−8.8%
1940 8,786−1.2%
1950 8,640−1.7%
1960 9,1746.2%
1970 9,126−0.5%
1980 10,12911.0%
1990 10,8967.6%
2000 11,5676.2%
2010 11,391−1.5%
Est. 201810,783 [1] −5.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]
1790–1960 [6] 1900–1990 [7]
1990–2000 [8] 2010–2013 [2]

As of the census [9] of 2000, there were 11,567 people, 5,004 households, and 3,412 families residing in the county. The population density was 87 people per square mile (34/km²). There were 6,498 housing units at an average density of 49 per square mile (19/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 69.95% White, 28.88% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. 0.61% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include traditional culture, business, supplies, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every ten years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practices.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 5,004 households out of which 21.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.70% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.80% were non-families. 28.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.71.

In the county, the population was spread out with 19.00% under the age of 18, 5.00% from 18 to 24, 19.60% from 25 to 44, 28.00% from 45 to 64, and 28.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females there were 86.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.50 males.

Type of workers for this country are: Private wage or salary (72%); Government (15%); and Self-employed (12%). [10] The median income for a household in the county was $33,239, and the median income for a family was $42,957. Males had a median income of $30,592 versus $23,039 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,663. Approximately 9.90% of families and 12.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.00% of those under age 18 and 11.20% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Lancaster County is governed by a five-member board of supervisors. The board meets in the Lancaster County Administration Building at 7 p.m. on the last Thursday of every month. The Administration building is located at 8311 Mary Ball Road in Lancaster, Virginia. [11]

Board of Supervisors

Constitutional officers

Lancaster is represented by Republican Ryan T. McDougle in the Virginia Senate, Republican Margaret Bevans Ransone in the Virginia House of Delegates, and Republican Robert J. "Rob" Wittman in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 53.0%3,52343.2% 2,8693.8% 253
2012 53.9%3,75345.2% 3,1490.9% 59
2008 52.6%3,64746.6% 3,2350.8% 56
2004 59.8%3,72439.8% 2,4770.5% 29
2000 62.5%3,41135.5% 1,9372.0% 107
1996 55.4%2,70937.7% 1,8447.0% 340
1992 51.4%2,84132.8% 1,81215.8% 875
1988 67.0%3,38030.8% 1,5512.2% 112
1984 67.7%3,41630.9% 1,5591.4% 69
1980 61.0%2,78034.4% 1,5674.6% 210
1976 58.4%2,38138.8% 1,5812.8% 112
1972 71.6%2,68326.9% 1,0091.4% 53
1968 44.9%1,64031.1% 1,13424.0% 876
1964 57.1%1,66342.8% 1,2450.1% 3
1960 59.6%1,34039.8% 8950.7% 15
1956 70.7%1,38019.1% 37310.2% 200
1952 61.5%1,22837.7% 7530.8% 16
1948 39.1% 45947.7%56013.2% 155
1944 36.8% 39062.8%6660.5% 5
1940 30.6% 31768.6%7110.8% 8
1936 31.8% 32268.0%6890.3% 3
1932 29.3% 27268.9%6391.7% 16
1928 62.3%52037.7% 315
1924 13.5% 9084.4%5642.1% 14
1920 25.3% 13874.0%4040.7% 4
1916 11.1% 5888.3%4610.6% 3
1912 14.0% 8282.0%4793.9% 23

Communities

Towns

Census-designated places

Outskirts of Lively, in Lancaster County FieldNearLively.jpg
Outskirts of Lively, in Lancaster County

Other unincorporated communities

Landmarks and attractions

Lancaster County is home to the historic church of St. Mary's, Whitechapel, founded in 1669. Mary Ball Washington, mother of George Washington, was born in the parish of St. Mary's. Rappahannock General Hospital is in Kilmarnock, it is the only hospital on the Northern Neck. Other attractions are:

See also

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Kilmarnock, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

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References

  1. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  5. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  6. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  7. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  8. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  9. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  10. "Lancaster County, Virginia detailed profile - houses, real estate, cost of living, wages, work, agriculture, ancestries, and more". www.city-data.com. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  11. www.lancova.com Retrieved 17 May 2014 Archived 17 May 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  12. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 9 April 2018.

Coordinates: 37°43′N76°25′W / 37.71°N 76.41°W / 37.71; -76.41