Prince George County, Virginia

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Prince George County
Prince George County Courthouse.jpg
Prince George County Courthouse
PrinceGeorge.png
Map of Virginia highlighting Prince George County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°11′N77°13′W / 37.19°N 77.22°W / 37.19; -77.22
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
Founded1703
Named for Prince George of Denmark
Seat Prince George
Largest community Fort Lee
Area
  Total282 sq mi (730 km2)
  Land265 sq mi (690 km2)
  Water17 sq mi (40 km2)  5.9%
Population
 (2020)
  Total43,010
  Density150/sq mi (59/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 4th
Website www.princegeorgeva.org

Prince George County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 43,010. [1] Its county seat is Prince George. [2]

Contents

Prince George County is located within the Greater Richmond Region of the U.S. state of Virginia.

History

Prince George County was formed in 1703 in the Virginia Colony from the portion of Charles City County that was south of the James River. It was named in honor of Prince George of Denmark, husband of Anne, Queen of Great Britain.

In 1619, "Charles Cittie" [ sic ] was one of four "boroughs" or "incorporations" created by the Virginia Company. The first Charles City County courthouses were located along the James River at Westover Plantation on the north side and City Point on the south side. The Virginia Company lost its charter in 1624, and Virginia became a royal colony. Charles City Shire was formed in 1634 in the Virginia Colony by order of Charles I, King of England. It was named as Charles City County in 1643.

Charles Cittie, Charles City Shire, and Charles City County all extended to both sides of the James River, which was the major transportation thoroughfare of the Virginia Colony throughout the 17th century. The original central city of Charles City County was Charles City Point, which was in an area south of the James River at the confluence of the Appomattox River. The name was later shortened to City Point.

In 1703, all of the original area of Charles City County south of the James River was severed to form Prince George County. As population increased, portions were divided and organized as several additional counties. City Point became an incorporated town in Prince George County.

20th century to present

Annexed by the independent city of Hopewell in 1923, City Point is no longer in the county.

Nearby the current bridges, this water-only section of the county at the Appomattox River was the site of a fatal bus accident at an open drawbridge on December 22, 1935; thirteen persons died.

Geography

Rural scene along U.S. Route 301 in Prince George County PrinceGeorgeCountyscene.jpg
Rural scene along U.S. Route 301 in Prince George County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 282 square miles (730 km2), of which 265 square miles (690 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (5.9%) is water. [3] The northwestern corner of the county near the cities of Hopewell and Petersburg, and the location of Fort Lee is exurban, but the rest of the county is rural with most land devoted to agriculture and timber production.

Adjacent counties / independent cities

National protected areas

Economy

Top employers

According to the County's 2009 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, [4] the top employers in the county are:

#Employer# of Employees
1 United States Department of Defense 1,000+
2County of Prince George1,000+
3 Food Lion 500–999
4 United States Department of Justice 500–999
5 Standard Motor Products 250–499
6 United States Army 250–499
7Riverside Regional Jail250–499
8 Perdue Farms 250–499
9 United States Departments of the Army & Air Force 250–499
10 Ace Hardware 100–249

Goya Foods has its Virginia offices south of the Prince George CDP. [5] [6]

Government

In modern times, there are no centralized cities or towns in the county. Prince George Court House, which uses the postal address Prince George, Virginia, is the focal point of government. The County Administrator answers to the elected Board of Supervisors, who are elected from single-member districts.

Politics

United States presidential election results for Prince George County, Virginia [7]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 10,10357.96%7,10340.75%2261.30%
2016 9,15756.58%6,41939.66%6083.76%
2012 8,87955.33%6,99143.57%1761.10%
2008 8,75254.68%7,13044.55%1240.77%
2004 8,13161.35%5,06638.22%570.43%
2000 6,57960.36%4,18238.37%1391.28%
1996 5,21654.86%3,49836.79%7938.34%
1992 4,79950.99%3,08732.80%1,52616.21%
1988 4,98266.29%2,46932.85%640.85%
1984 4,99969.64%2,13629.76%430.60%
1980 3,38957.56%2,31039.23%1893.21%
1976 2,25445.44%2,63053.02%761.53%
1972 2,40567.71%1,08430.52%631.77%
1968 1,55932.75%1,27226.72%1,93040.54%
1964 1,79054.32%1,50245.58%30.09%
1960 72742.14%98356.99%150.87%
1956 68946.24%64243.09%15910.67%
1952 54146.40%61252.49%131.11%
1948 31726.20%74561.57%14812.23%
1944 30127.41%79672.50%10.09%
1940 15616.86%76682.81%30.32%
1936 12815.17%71384.48%30.36%
1932 11515.99%59783.03%70.97%
1928 23535.44%42864.56%00.00%
1924 9023.62%27973.23%123.15%
1920 12725.10%37574.11%40.79%
1916 7221.75%25877.95%10.30%
1912 4214.24%20469.15%4916.61%


Law enforcement

Prince George County is served primarily by the Prince George County Police Department and the Prince George County Sheriff's Office. The police department's responsibility is the enforcement of the laws of the Commonwealth and local ordinances. The primary responsibility of the Sheriff's Office is the security of the courts and service of court (criminal and civil) papers. The Sheriff's Office also assists the police department in the enforcement of the laws of the Commonwealth as a secondary responsibility. [8]

Correctional institutions

Riverside Regional Jail is located west of 295 and south of the Appomattox River in the county. It serves seven member localities. It is overseen by the Riverside Regional Jail Authority Board. [9]

In addition, the Federal Correctional Institution, Petersburg is located west of the regional jail, closer to the Appomattox River as it curves south. This complex for male inmates, located west of the independent city of Hopewell, Virginia, consists of both a low-security facility, with 1,111 inmates; 293 at the adjacent minimum-security satellite camp; and 1,595 at the associated medium-security facility. All are managed by the Bureau of Prisons (BOP). [10]

Towns, communities, region

There are currently no incorporated towns within Prince George County. Unincorporated towns or communities in the county include:

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Transportation

Interstate Highways 95 and 295 pass through the county, as does north-south U.S. Route 301 and east-west U.S. Route 460. State Route 10 runs along the northern shore of the James River near several of the James River plantations located in the county. State Route 106 runs through Prince George, the county seat.

Freight railroad service for the county is provided by CSX Transportation, which interchanges with Norfolk Southern at Petersburg. The famous 52-mile long tangent rail line between Petersburg and Suffolk of the former Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad was built by William Mahone in the 1850s, and now forms a vital link of the Norfolk Southern system. A Norfolk Southern Railway automobile transloading facility is located nearby. There are future plans underway for a large Intermodal freight transport railroad-trucking transfer facility in Prince George County as well.

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 8,173
1800 7,425−9.2%
1810 8,0508.4%
1820 8,030−0.2%
1830 8,3674.2%
1840 7,175−14.2%
1850 7,5965.9%
1860 8,41110.7%
1870 7,820−7.0%
1880 10,05428.6%
1890 7,872−21.7%
1900 7,752−1.5%
1910 7,8481.2%
1920 12,91564.6%
1930 10,311−20.2%
1940 12,22618.6%
1950 19,67961.0%
1960 20,2703.0%
1970 29,09243.5%
1980 25,733−11.5%
1990 27,3946.5%
2000 33,04720.6%
2010 35,7258.1%
2020 43,01020.4%
2021 (est.)42,880 [13] −0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [14]
1790–1960 [15] 1900–1990 [16]
1990–2000 [17] 2010–2020 [18]

2020 census

Prince George County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [19] Pop 2020 [18] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)20,82222,66258.28%52.69%
Black or African American alone (NH)11,15012,69431.21%29.51%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)1842210.52%0.51%
Asian alone (NH)5208221.46%1.91%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)1001410.28%0.33%
Some Other Race alone (NH)611910.17%0.44%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH)8301,9352.32%4.50%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)2,0584,3445.76%10.10%
Total35,72543,010100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2010 Census

As of the census [20] of 2010, there were 35,725 people, 10,159 households, and 8,096 families residing in the county. The population density was 124 people per square mile (48/km2). There were 10,726 housing units at an average density of 40 per square mile (16/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 60.93% White, 32.54% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.73% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 2.19% from other races, and 2.03% from two or more races. 4.92% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, on July 1st, 2019, it is estimated that there is a population of 38,353 people living in Prince George County.

There were 10,159 households, out of which 41.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.50% were married couples living together, 12.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.30% were non-families. 17.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.10% under the age of 18, 13.60% from 18 to 24, 33.30% from 25 to 44, 20.80% from 45 to 64, and 7.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 117.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 120.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $49,877, and the median income for a family was $53,750. Males had a median income of $37,363 versus $26,347 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,196. About 6.50% of families and 8.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.40% of those under age 18 and 8.30% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Colleges and Universities

Public High Schools

Public Jr. High Schools

Public Middle Schools

Public Elementary Schools

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

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State Route 156 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. The state highway runs 57.38 miles (92.34 km) from U.S. Route 301 and SR 35 in Templeton north to US 360 Business in Mechanicsville. SR 156 follows a circuitous route through the eastern part of the Richmond–Petersburg metropolitan area. South of the James River, the state highway connects Templeton in Prince George County with Hopewell, which is directly served by SR 156 Business. SR 156 crosses the James River on the Benjamin Harrison Memorial Bridge and briefly passes through Charles City County. For most of its length in Henrico and Hanover, the state highway is a rural road that provides access to several units of Richmond National Battlefield Park. However, SR 156 provides access to Richmond International Airport, Interstate 64 (I-64), and I-295 as it passes through the Richmond suburbs of Sandston and Highland Springs as a major highway.

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Virginia State Route 144

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Theodorick Bland, also known as Theodorick Bland, Sr. or Theodorick Bland of Cawsons, was Virginia planter who served as a member of the first Virginia Senate, as well as a militia officer and clerk of Prince George County, Virginia.

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References

  1. "Prince George County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  4. County of Prince George CAFR Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine
  5. "Contact Us." Goya Foods. Retrieved on March 26, 2016. "Goya Foods of Virginia 6040 Quality Way Prince George, VA 23875"
  6. "2010 CENSUS – CENSUS BLOCK MAP: Prince George CDP, VA" (Archive). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on April 19, 2016. – Interstate 295 is in the left side of the map
  7. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  8. Prince George County : Sheriff's Office Archived 2010-01-06 at the Wayback Machine
  9. "Riverside Regional Jail", official website; accessed 21 March 2017
  10. "FCI Petersburg Low" and "FCI Petersburg Medium", Bureau of Prisons; accessed 21 March 2017
  11. Kingwood, VA Big Map (Virginia Hometown Locator)
  12. Henshaw Airport - VG42 (AirNav)
  13. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021" . Retrieved April 6, 2022.
  14. "Census of Population and Housing from 1790". US Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  15. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  16. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  17. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  18. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Prince George County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau .
  19. "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Prince George County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau .
  20. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.

19. "Quick Facts Prince George County, Virginia" Retrieved July 1, 2019

Coordinates: 37°11′N77°13′W / 37.19°N 77.22°W / 37.19; -77.22