Amelia County, Virginia

Last updated

Amelia County
Amelia VA - county courthouse.jpg
Amelia County Court House
Amelia Seal.png
Map of Virginia highlighting Amelia County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°20′N77°59′W / 37.34°N 77.98°W / 37.34; -77.98
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
Founded1735
Named for Princess Amelia
Seat Amelia Court House
Area
  Total359 sq mi (930 km2)
  Land355 sq mi (920 km2)
  Water3.3 sq mi (9 km2)  0.9%
Population
 (2020)
  Total13,265
  Density37/sq mi (14/km2)
Demonym(s) Amelian, Amellianaire
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
23002, 23083, 23105
Congressional district 7th
Website va-ameliacounty.civicplus.com

Amelia County is a county located just southwest of Richmond in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States. The county is located in Central Virginia and is included in the Greater Richmond Region. Its county seat is Amelia Court House. [1]

Contents

Amelia County was created in 1735 from parts of Prince George and Brunswick counties, and was named in honor of Princess Amelia of Great Britain. Parts of the county were later carved out to create Prince Edward and Nottoway counties.

As of the 2020 census, the county population was 13,265. [2]

History

Princess Amelia of Great Britain, for whom the county is named Princess Amelia of Great Britain (1711-1786) by Jean-Baptiste van Loo.jpg
Princess Amelia of Great Britain, for whom the county is named

Amelia County was created by legislative act in 1734 and 1735 [3] from parts of Prince George and Brunswick counties. The county is named for Princess Amelia of Great Britain, daughter of King George II. As was customary, Amelia County was reduced by the division of territory to form newer counties as the population increased in the region; in 1754, Prince Edward County was formed from parts of Amelia County, and in 1789, Nottoway County was formed. The area was developed for plantation agriculture dependent on slave labor.

During the Civil War, Confederate general Robert E. Lee and his army spent April 4 and 5, 1865, at Amelia Court House before his surrender on April 9 to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox. The last major battle of his army was fought at Sayler's Creek, on the border of Amelia and Prince Edward counties, on April 6.

Amelia is known for its minerals, including the nation's best supply of amazonite, a green feldspar found at the Morefield mine. In the 19th century, spas were developed around its mineral springs, which were destinations for travelers.

In 1986 the Amelia County Fair sponsored a competition for the world's largest potato pancake (with apple sauce). It was constructed to raise money that year for the German American National Scholarship Fund. The pancake weighed more than two and one-quarter tons and used four truckloads of potatoes.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 359 square miles (930 km2), of which 355 square miles (920 km2) is land and 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) (0.9%) is water. [4]

Amelia County lies in the Piedmont region of Virginia, known for rolling hills and small ridges that lie between the Blue Ridge Mountains and Coastal Plain of Virginia. The county is bordered by the Appomattox River to the north and west, and Namozine Creek to the east.

Amelia County is drained by tributaries of the Appomattox. The lowest elevation in the county is 158 feet (48 m), on Lake Chesdin on the Appomattox at the eastern extremity of the county. The highest elevation is 525 feet (160 m), on SR 616 (S. Genito Road) at the community of Gills in the southwest corner of the county. [5]

Adjacent counties

Transportation

Air

US Highways

State Routes

Secondary Routes

Rail

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 18,097
1800 9,432−47.9%
1810 10,59412.3%
1820 11,1044.8%
1830 11,036−0.6%
1840 10,320−6.5%
1850 9,770−5.3%
1860 10,7419.9%
1870 9,878−8.0%
1880 10,3775.1%
1890 9,068−12.6%
1900 9,037−0.3%
1910 8,720−3.5%
1920 9,80012.4%
1930 8,799−10.2%
1940 8,495−3.5%
1950 7,908−6.9%
1960 7,815−1.2%
1970 7,592−2.9%
1980 8,40510.7%
1990 8,7874.5%
2000 11,40029.7%
2010 12,69011.3%
2020 13,2654.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010 [10] 2020 [11]

2020 census

Amelia County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [10] Pop 2020 [11] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)9,2339,68772.76%73.03%
Black or African American alone (NH)2,9252,54623.05%19.19%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)39180.31%0.14%
Asian alone (NH)27630.21%0.47%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)000.00%0.00%
Some Other Race alone (NH)10500.08%0.38%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH)1664761.31%3.59%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)2904252.29%3.20%
Total12,69013,265100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.


2000 Census

As of the census [12] of 2000, there were 11,400 people, 4,240 households, and 3,175 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 people per square mile (12/km2). There were 4,609 housing units, at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 70.57% White, 28.05% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.80% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,240 households, of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.10% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.10% were non-families. 20.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.07.

The median age was 38 years, with 25.30% under 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. For every 100 females, there were 97.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.20 males.

The median household income was $40,252, and the median family income was $47,157. Males had a median income of $32,315, versus $23,102 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,858. 8.40% of the population and 6.70% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 7.10% were under the age of 18 and 11.70% were 65 or older.

Culture

Seasonal Events

Attractions

Government

Board of Supervisors

Constitutional officers

Amelia County is represented by Republican Amanda Chase in the Virginia Senate, Republican Thomas C. Wright Jr. in the Virginia House of Delegates, and Democrat Abigail Spanberger in the U.S. House of Representatives.

United States presidential election results for Amelia County, Virginia [15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 5,39068.29%2,41130.55%921.17%
2016 4,70866.88%2,12830.23%2042.90%
2012 4,33162.63%2,49036.01%941.36%
2008 3,97060.81%2,48838.11%711.09%
2004 3,49964.83%1,86234.50%360.67%
2000 2,94761.55%1,75436.63%871.82%
1996 2,11951.13%1,62539.21%4009.65%
1992 2,06248.82%1,53436.32%62814.87%
1988 2,18760.85%1,35937.81%481.34%
1984 2,33661.41%1,43237.64%360.95%
1980 1,96953.20%1,64344.39%892.40%
1976 1,63447.25%1,71549.60%1093.15%
1972 1,60664.99%77831.49%873.52%
1968 85733.90%83032.83%84133.27%
1964 1,34860.21%88439.48%70.31%
1960 78451.44%70846.46%322.10%
1956 74543.11%40323.32%58033.56%
1952 83253.64%70345.33%161.03%
1948 37235.16%44341.87%24322.97%
1944 29534.67%55364.98%30.35%
1940 26732.13%56267.63%20.24%
1936 23923.97%75375.53%50.50%
1932 14216.63%70182.08%111.29%
1928 27735.74%49864.26%00.00%
1924 15328.33%37268.89%152.78%
1920 17931.18%38967.77%61.05%
1916 8016.39%40382.58%51.02%
1912 327.82%32579.46%5212.71%


Media

The Amelia Bulletin Monitor , a weekly newspaper, has covered the county since 1973.

Education

Public Primary and secondary schools

Amelia County is served by the Amelia County School District.

Private Primary and secondary Schools

Communities

There are no incorporated communities in Amelia County.

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Historic sites

The following sites in Amelia County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

Notable residents

Related Research Articles

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Namozine Creek is a 23.6-mile-long (38.0 km) stream in the U.S. state of Virginia. It is a right-bank tributary of the Appomattox River. Rising in Nottoway County 6 miles northeast of the town of Blackstone, Namozine Creek forms the boundary between Dinwiddie County to the south and Nottoway and Amelia counties to the north for nearly its entire length. It flows generally east-northeast, and joins the Appomattox River at Lake Chesdin 13 miles (21 km) west of Petersburg.

Earls is a rural unincorporated community in Amelia County in the U.S. state of Virginia. Earls lies along SR 153 at the southern terminus of SR 641, 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the Amelia-Nottoway county line.

Gills is a rural unincorporated community in Amelia County in the U.S. state of Virginia, located around the intersections of SR 616 with SR 657, 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the Nottoway county line. Gills is situated on the highest point in Amelia County, at 527 feet (161 m) above sea level, and is also the westernmost hamlet in the county.

References

  1. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. "Amelia County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  3. History of Amelia County Archived 2010-12-05 at the Wayback Machine
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. "Geographic Names Information System".
  6. "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  10. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Amelia County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau .
  11. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Amelia County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau .
  12. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  13. Amelia County Fair. Retrieved July 18, 2021.
  14. "Cruise-In hosted by the Time Bandits Car Club on April 10, 2021".
  15. David Leip. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  16. Convenience Centers, Amelia County, Virginia, official government website. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  17. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963.
  18. Scruggs, Lawson Andrew (1893). Women of Distinction: Remarkable in Works and Invincible in Character. Raleigh, North Carolina: L. A. Scruggs. p. 247. OCLC   4255360.

Coordinates: 37°20′N77°59′W / 37.34°N 77.98°W / 37.34; -77.98