Bowling Green, Virginia

Last updated

Bowling Green, Virginia
Town
Bowling Green VA.JPG
Main Street, Bowling Green
Seal of Bowling Green, Virginia.png
VAMap-doton-BowlingGreen.PNG
Location in Virginia
USA Virginia location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Bowling Green
Location in Virginia
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Bowling Green
Location in the contiguous United States
Coordinates: 38°3′12″N77°20′51″W / 38.05333°N 77.34750°W / 38.05333; -77.34750 Coordinates: 38°3′12″N77°20′51″W / 38.05333°N 77.34750°W / 38.05333; -77.34750
CountryUnited States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
County Caroline
Founded1837
Government
  MayorJason Satterwhite
Area
[1]
  Total1.63 sq mi (4.22 km2)
  Land1.60 sq mi (4.15 km2)
  Water0.02 sq mi (0.06 km2)
Elevation
226 ft (69 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,111
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
1,175
  Density732.54/sq mi (282.81/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
22427-22428
Area code(s) 804
FIPS code 51-08888 [3]
GNIS feature ID1498454 [4]
Website Official website

Bowling Green is an incorporated town in Caroline County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,111 at the 2010 census.

Contents

The county seat of Caroline County [5] since 1803, Bowling Green is best known as the "cradle of American horse racing", the home of the second oldest Virginia Masonic Lodge, and the current location of the oldest continuously inhabited residence in Virginia.

History

The town of Bowling Green was earlier known as New Hope. One of the earliest stage roads in the colony ran through the area from Richmond to the Potomac River, where a ferry crossing was operated to Charles County, Maryland. One of the first stage lines in America to maintain a regular schedule operated along this road. New Hope Tavern was built along the road in the 18th century and the area around it became known as New Hope. [6]

The town was renamed for "The Bowling Green" which was the plantation of town founder, Major John Thomas Hoomes, [7] who donated the land and funds for a new courthouse when the community became the county seat in 1803. The origin of the plantation's name is not definitive but may be based on the 2-acre (8,100 m2) green sward in front of the plantation house itself. The Bowling Green Estate was the site of one of the first tracks built to race horses in America. [8] The plantation house, pre-Georgian tidewater colonial in style, was built circa 1741. A prominent colonial landmark, it is one of the oldest houses in original condition in Virginia [6] and is listed on both the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places. [8]

The present Caroline County Court House was built in 1835 and Bowling Green was incorporated as a town about 2 years later, in 1837. The town is best known as the "cradle of American horse racing" and as the home of the second-oldest Masonic Lodge in Virginia, Kilwinning Crosse, No. 2-237 .

The Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad (chartered in 1834) was built through nearby Milford (just west of town) and reached Fredericksburg by 1837. This important rail link between several major Northern railroads at Washington, DC and other major Southern railroads at Richmond was long partially owned by the Commonwealth of Virginia, and became part of CSX Transportation in the 1990s. It is a major freight railroad line for north–south traffic and the corridor also hosts many Amtrak trains. Although the closest Virginia Railway Express (VRE) commuter passenger rail service to Northern Virginia is currently accessed at Fredericksburg, future VRE extensions southward may include service at Milford which would be very convenient for Bowling Green and the surrounding area.

In 1855, a gazetteer described the town as having "2 churches, 3 stores, 2 mills, and about 300 inhabitants". [9]

Today, Bowling Green is located along Virginia State Route 2, one of the two earlier highways between Richmond and Fredericksburg. In later years, U.S. Route 301 was built through the area, connecting Richmond with Baltimore, Maryland with what was effectively an eastern bypass of the Washington, DC area for north–south traffic along the U.S. east coast. A new road, Virginia State Route 207 was established from Bowling Green west to Carmel Church, where it intersects Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1, major north–south highways. The musician Jason Manns is from Bowling Green.

In 1941, the United States government acquired 77,000 acres (310 km2) of Caroline County to the north and east of Bowling Green and established the A.P. Hill Military Reservation. Now known as Fort A.P. Hill, it was named for a Virginia military hero, U.S. Army and later Confederate General Ambrose Powell Hill, who was killed just prior to the end of the War in 1865. At the massive complex, thousands of regular military and reserve troops undergo training each year. It has also been the site of national Jamboree gatherings of the Boy Scouts of America. [10]

In addition to "The Bowling Green," Auburn, the Bowling Green Historic District, Caroline County Courthouse, and Green Falls are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [11]

Geography

Bowling Green is located at 38°3′12″N77°20′51″W / 38.05333°N 77.34750°W / 38.05333; -77.34750 (38.053428, 77.347404). [12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.2 km2), of which 1.6 square miles (4.1 km2) is land and 0.04 square mile (0.1 km2) (1.24%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 377
1860 237−37.1%
1870 39566.7%
1880 4267.8%
1890 51120.0%
1900 458−10.4%
1910 433−5.5%
1920 4636.9%
1930 422−8.9%
1940 54128.2%
1950 61613.9%
1960 528−14.3%
1970 5280.0%
1980 66525.9%
1990 7279.3%
2000 93628.7%
2010 1,11118.7%
2019 (est.)1,175 [2] 5.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [13]

As of the census [3] of 2000, there were 936 people, 387 households, and 212 families residing in the town. The population density was 587.1 people per square mile (227.3/km2). There were 425 housing units at an average density of 266.6 per square mile (103.2/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 80.13% White, 18.38% African American, 0.53% Native American, 0.32% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.92% of the population.

There were 387 households, out of which 22.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.6% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.0% were non-families. 39.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 20.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 17.1% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 32.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females, there were 69.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 66.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $32,250, and the median income for a family was $49,792. Males had a median income of $30,750 versus $25,341 for females. The per capita income for the town was $20,223. About 8.5% of families and 14.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 22.6% of those age 65 or over.

Related Research Articles

Fredericksburg, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Fredericksburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 27,982. The Bureau of Economic Analysis of the United States Department of Commerce combines the city of Fredericksburg with neighboring Spotsylvania County for statistical purposes.

Caroline County, Virginia County in Virginia, United States

Caroline County is a United States county located in the eastern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The northern boundary of the county borders on the Rappahannock River, notably at the historic town of Port Royal. The Caroline county seat is Bowling Green.

Smiths Grove, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Smiths Grove is a home rule-class city in Warren County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 714 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Bowling Green, Kentucky Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Weldon, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Weldon is a town in Halifax County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 1,655 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Bethune, South Carolina Town in South Carolina, United States

Bethune is a small town in Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 334 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Columbia, South Carolina Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Port Royal, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Port Royal is an incorporated town in Caroline County, Virginia, United States. The population was 126 at the 2010 census.

Chester, Virginia CDP in Virginia, United States

Chester is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 20,987 at the 2010 census.

McKenney, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

McKenney is an incorporated town in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, United States. The population was 483 at the 2010 census.

Tappahannock, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Tappahannock is the oldest town in Essex County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,375 at the 2010 census, up from 2,068 at the 2000 census. Located on the Rappahannock River, Tappahannock is the county seat of Essex County. Its name comes from an Algonquian language word lappihanne, meaning "Town on the rise and fall of water" or "where the tide ebbs and flows." The Rappahannock is a tidal estuary from above this point and downriver to its mouth on Chesapeake Bay.

Lincolnia, Virginia Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Lincolnia is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 22,828 at the 2010 census, an increase of over 44% from 2000.

Lorton, Virginia Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Lorton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 18,610 as of the 2010 census.

South Boston, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

South Boston, formerly Boyd's Ferry, is a town in Halifax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 8,142 at the 2010 census, down from 8,491 at the 2000 census. It is the most populous town in Halifax County.

Ashland, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Ashland is a town in Hanover County, Virginia, United States, located 16 miles (26 km) north of Richmond along Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 7,225, up from 6,619 at the 2000 census.

Burkeville, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Burkeville is a town in Nottoway County, Virginia, United States. The population was 432 at the 2010 census. The source of the town name is disputed. The town is located on the crossroads of U.S. Routes 360 and 460.

Woodbridge, Virginia Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Woodbridge is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States, located 20 miles (32 km) south of Washington, D.C. Bounded by the Occoquan and Potomac rivers, Woodbridge Magisterial District had 54,275 residents at the 2010 census. The Woodbridge census-designated place comprises just one portion of the magisterial district and had a population of 4,055 in the 2010 census. The census-designated place consists solely of the section north of Occoquan Road and Dawson Beach Road, and east of Interstate 95.

Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia Unincorporated census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Spotsylvania Courthouse is a census-designated place (CDP) and the county seat of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, located 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Fredericksburg. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census designated place (CDP), the population was 4,239 at the 2010 census.

Falmouth, Virginia Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Falmouth is a census-designated place (CDP) in Stafford County, Virginia, United States. Situated on the north bank of the Rappahannock River at the falls, the community is north of and opposite the city of Fredericksburg. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place (CDP), Falmouth's population was 4,274 as of the 2010 census.

Pamplin City, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Pamplin City is a town in Appomattox and Prince Edward counties in the U.S. state of Virginia. The population was 219 at the 2010 census.

Gordonsville, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Gordonsville is a town in Orange County in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. Located about 19 miles northeast of Charlottesville and 65 miles northwest of Richmond, the population was 1,496 at the 2010 census.

King William County, Virginia County in Virginia, United States

King William County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 17,810. Its county seat is King William.

References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. 1 2 History Archived August 18, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  7. Dyson, Cathy (July 20, 2003). "History and legend unlock origins of unusual names". The Free Lance-Star. pp. A7. Retrieved May 3, 2015.
  8. 1 2 Acknowledgment For Codification Archived November 12, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  9. Edwards, Richard (1855). Statistical Gazetteer of the State of Virginia. Richmond, Virginia: Richard Edwards. p.  183.
  10. Fort AP Hill, Va • History Archived April 9, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  11. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  12. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  13. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.