Hiawa

Last updated
Hiawa
Village
Guyana location map.svg
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Hiawa
Location in Guyana
Coordinates: 3°23′24″N59°37′44″W / 3.3899°N 59.6288°W / 3.3899; -59.6288 Coordinates: 3°23′24″N59°37′44″W / 3.3899°N 59.6288°W / 3.3899; -59.6288
Country Flag of Guyana.svg Guyana
Region Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo
Government
  CouncilorAnastasia Clementino [1]
Population
[1]
  Totalc.278

Hiawa is an indigenous village of Macushi Amerindians in the Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo Region of Guyana. It is located in the Rupununi savannah. [2]

Overview

Hiawa has a school, a health hut, and a church. [1] The nearest big village is Nappi. [3] In 2016, a road was built connecting the village to Lethem. [2] In 2019, a multi-purpose building was constructed in the village. [4]

In 2016, the residents of Hiawa launched a protest, because their requests for land extensions were not being processed while private developers are encroaching on their territory. [5]

The economy of the village is based on agriculture. The main products are corn, sweet cassava, sweet potatoes, and bananas. [1]

Related Research Articles

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Rupununi savannah

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Hiawa". Ministry of Indigenous Peoples' Affairs. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  2. 1 2 "Hiawa lauded for building Rupununi road". Stabroek News. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  3. Kumar Mahabir and Jai Sears. "Politics and the Amerindians of Guyana (Part 2 of 3)". Indo Caribbean Publications. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  4. "$14M SLED projects at Hiawa working well". Department of Public Information. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  5. "Central Rupununi villagers want land extensions". Guyana Chronicle. Retrieved 28 February 2021.