Sumatran muntjac

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Sumatran muntjac
Sumatran Muntjac WDL11285.png
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Cervidae
Subfamily: Cervinae
Genus: Muntiacus
Species:
Subspecies:
M. m. montanus
Trinomial name
Muntiacus muntjak montanus
(Robinson & Kloss, 1918)

The Sumatran muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak montanus) is a subspecies of Indian muntjac in the deer family which can be the size of a large dog. It was discovered in 1914, but had not been sighted since 1930 until one was snared and freed from a hunter's snare in Kerinci Seblat National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia in 2002. [1] Two other Sumatran muntjac have since been photographed in the park. The Sumatran muntjac was placed on the IUCN Red List in 2008, but was listed as Data Deficient, as taxonomic issues are still unresolved [2] (it has been considered either a distinct species, M. montanus, or a subspecies M. muntjak montanus of the common muntjac). The distribution of the taxon is also uncertain and may be more extensive than suggested. It is possible that some previous sightings of the common muntjac in Western Sumatra were the Sumatran muntjac. [2]

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References

  1. """Lost" deer rediscovered in Indonesia"". Reuters. 2008-10-10. Retrieved 2008-10-10.
  2. 1 2 Muntiacus montanus at the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species