Rusa (genus)

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Rusa
Sambar deer Cervus unicolor.jpg
Sambar
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Cervidae
Subfamily: Cervinae
Genus: Rusa
C. H. Smith, 1827
Type species
Cervus unicolor
Species

See text

Rusa is a genus of deer from southern Asia. They have traditionally been included in Cervus , and genetic evidence suggests this may be more appropriate than their present placement in a separate genus. [1]

Three of the four species have relatively small distributions in the Philippines and Indonesia, but the sambar is more widespread, ranging from India east and north to China and south to the Greater Sundas. All are threatened by habitat loss and hunting in their native ranges, but three of the species have also been introduced elsewhere.

Species

ImageScientific nameCommon nameDistribution
Cervus alfredi5.jpg Rusa alfredi Visayan spotted deer, Philippine spotted deerPhilippines
Cervus mariannus.jpg Rusa marianna Philippine brown deer or Philippine sambarNegros-Panay, Babuyan/Batanes, Palawan, Sulu Faunal Regions
Javan Deer stag - Baluran NP - East Java (30049870271).jpg Rusa timorensis Javan rusa or Sunda sambarIndonesia and East Timor.
Sambar deer.JPG Rusa unicolor sambarHimalayas, mainland Southeast Asia including Burma, Thailand, Indochina, the Malay Peninsula, South China including Hainan Island, Taiwan, and the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Borneo

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References

  1. Pitraa, Fickela, Meijaard, Groves (2004). Evolution and phylogeny of old world deer. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 33: 880–895.