USS Wilkes-Barre

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USS Wilkes-Barre may refer to:

USS <i>Astoria</i> (CL-90)

The third USS Astoria (CL-90) was a Cleveland-class light cruiser of the United States Navy.

USS <i>Wilkes-Barre</i> (CL-103) ship

USS Wilkes-Barre (CL-103) was a Cleveland-class light cruiser of the United States Navy that served during the last year of World War II. She was named after the city of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

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