ISO/TR 11941

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ISO/TR 11941:1996 is a Korean romanization system used in ISO. It is not commonly used. One example of its use is in Unicode character names. The standard was withdrawn in December 2013.

Contents

It appears to be modelled on the Revised Romanization, cf. the vowels.

Transcription rules

Consonants

k/gkk/ggks/gskh/klk/lg
t/dtt/ddth/tlth/lt
p/bpp/bbps/bsph/plp/lblph/lp
c/jcc/jjch/cnc/nj
sssls
mlm
–, nghlhnh
r/ln

Vowels

aaeyayaewawae
eoeyeoyeweowe
ooeyo
uyu
eu
iyiwi

Usage

This system is used in Unicode character names. For example, the character ᄎ (U+110E) is named "HANGUL CHOSEONG CHIEUCH" (한글 초성 치읓); ㅊ is romanized as "ch." However, the character 차 (U+CC28) is named "HANGUL SYLLABLE CA"; ㅊ is romanized as "c."


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