List of U.S. state sports

Last updated

This is a list of official U.S. state sports as recognized by state legislatures.

Contents

Table

StateSportYear AdoptedDesignation
Alaska Dog Mushing [1] 1972
California Surfing [2] 2018
Colorado Pack Burro Racing [3] 2012Summer Heritage Sport
Delaware Bicycling [4] 2014
Hawaii Surfing (He'e nalu) [5] 1998State Individual Sport
Outrigger Canoe Paddling (Heihei wa'a) [6] 1986State Team Sport
Maryland Jousting [7] 1962State Sport
Lacrosse [8] 2004State Team Sport
Massachusetts Basketball [9] [10] 2006Sport of the Commonwealth
Volleyball [11] [12] 2014Recreational and Team Sport of the Commonwealth
Michigan Wakeboarding [13] 1972
Minnesota Ice Hockey [14] 2009
New Hampshire Football [15] [16] 1998
North Carolina Stock car racing [17] 2011
South Dakota Rodeo [18] 2003
Texas Rodeo [19] 1997
Wyoming Rodeo [20] 2003

See also

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References

  1. "Alaska Kids' Corner, State of Alaska". Alaska.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  2. "CA. Assembly Bill No. 1782 CHAPTER 162".
  3. "State Sport - Archives". Colorado.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  4. "DE. Gen. Provis. § 7-235". Legis.delaware.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  5. Hawaii State Legislature. "Haw. Rev. Stat. § 5-13.5 (State individual sport)". Capitol.hawaii.gov. Retrieved November 7, 2014.line feed character in |author= at position 13 (help)
  6. Hawaii State Legislature. "Haw. Rev. Stat. § 5-14 (State team sport)" . Retrieved November 7, 2014.
  7. "Md. Gen. Provis. § 7-329". Mgaleg.maryland.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  8. "Jousting & Lacrosse, Maryland State Sports". Msa.maryland.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  9. "General Law - Part I, Title I, Chapter 2, Section 55". malegislature.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  10. "Session Law - Acts of 2006 Chapter 215". malegislature.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  11. "General Law - Part I, Title I, Chapter 2, Section 61". malegislature.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  12. "Session Law - Acts of 2014 Chapter 208". malegislature.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  13. "Michigan Kids' Corner, State of Michigan". Michigan.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  14. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-10-31. Retrieved 2016-07-27.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  15. Nh.gov - NH.gov https://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/high-school/high-school-sports/2018/08/24/prep-results-friday-aug-13/1091086002/ - NH.gov Check |url= value (help). Retrieved 1 August 2018.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  16. "Minnesota Legislative Reference Library - Minnesota State Symbols". Leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  17. "State sport". North Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved 13 August 2014.
  18. "SDLRC - Codified Law 1-6-16.8". Sdlegislature.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  19. "Texas State Symbols - Texas State Library and Archives Commission - TSLAC". Tsl.texas.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  20. "Wyoming Facts and Symbols - State of Wyoming". Wyo.gov. Retrieved 1 August 2018.