Molina's hog-nosed skunk

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Molina's hog-nosed skunk
Chingue (Conepatus chinga) Inao Vasquez 001.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Mephitidae
Genus: Conepatus
Species:
C. chinga
Binomial name
Conepatus chinga
(Molina, 1782)
Molina's Hog-nosed Skunk area.png
Molina's hog-nosed skunk range

Molina's hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus chinga) is similar to the common skunk with scent glands used to spray an odorous liquid to offend potential predators. They have a resistance to pit viper venom, distinct thin white markings and a pink, hog-like, fleshy nose.

Contents

Habitat

The Molina's hog-nosed skunk's native range is throughout mid to southern South America, Chile, Peru, northern Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and southern Brazil. [2] The mammal is therefore associated with temperate regions and open areas, mainly described as the Pampas biome [3] and preferring to live in open vegetation, shrub forest and rocky sloped areas. [2]

Population and distribution

Typically they will live alone in an average home range size of about 1.66 individuals/km² with some overlapping and about six skunks per 3.5 km². [4] Although living in mostly solitary areas, the skunks will come together temporarily for mating purposes. [2]

Diet

Foraging mainly at night, the skunk is omnivorous eating birds, small mammals, eggs, insects, leaves, and fruit. The tooth morphology in the Molina's hog-nosed skunk, is different than most mammals in that their teeth are adapted to their omnivorous diet with grinding being the main function of the carnassial apparatus. [5]

Conservation status

The skunk is listed as "least concerned" according to the IUCN Redlist. The main threats of the skunk are increased habitat destruction and fragmentation [6] from over exploitation of humans and grazing of agriculture. The skunk is also affected by the planning of new roads and road-kills. Due to improper planning, habitat destruction, and fragmentation, the skunk has started living around man-made structures and along fences and buildings. [6]

Related Research Articles

Mephitidae family of mammals known for their odor

Mephitidae is a family of mammals comprising the skunks and stink badgers. They are noted for the great development of their anal scent glands, which they use to deter predators.

Skunk Common name of mammals in the family Mephitidae

Skunks are North and South American mammals in the family Mephitidae. Mephitidae means 'stink' which is how skunks got their name. While related to polecats and other members of the weasel family, skunks have as their closest Old World relatives the stink badgers. The animals are known for their ability to spray a liquid with a strong, unpleasant smell. Different species of skunk vary in appearance from black-and-white to brown, cream or ginger colored, but all have warning coloration.

Pampas Natural region

The Pampas are fertile South American lowlands that cover more than 750,000 km2 (289,577 sq mi) and include the Argentine provinces of Buenos Aires, La Pampa, Santa Fe, Entre Ríos and Córdoba; all of Uruguay; and Brazil's southernmost state, Rio Grande do Sul. The vast plains are a natural region, interrupted only by the low Ventana and Tandil hills, near Bahía Blanca and Tandil (Argentina), with a height of 1,300 m (4,265 ft) and 500 m (1,640 ft), respectively.

Pampas fox species of mammal

The pampas fox, also known as grey pampean fox, pampas zorro, aguará chaí, aguarachay, Azara's fox, or Azara's zorro, is a medium-sized zorro, or "false" fox, native to the South American pampas. The alternative common names are references to Spanish naturalist Félix de Azara.

Hog-nosed skunk genus of mammals

The hog-nosed skunks belong to the genus Conepatus and are members of the family Mephitidae (skunks). They are native to the Americas. They have white backs and tails and black underparts.

Pampas deer A species of mammals belonging to the deer, muntjac, roe deer, reindeer, and moose family of ruminants

Pampas deer is a species of Deer that live in the grasslands of South America at low elevations. They are known as venado or gama in Spanish and as veado-campeiro in Portuguese. Their habitat includes water and hills, often with winter drought, and grass that is high enough to cover a standing deer. Many of them live on the Pantanal wetlands, where there are ongoing conservation efforts, and other areas of annual flooding cycles. Human activity has changed much of the original landscape. They are known to live up to 12 years in the wild, longer if captive, but are threatened due to over-hunting and habitat loss. Many people are concerned over this loss, because a healthy deer population means a healthy grassland, and a healthy grassland is home to many species, some also threatened. Many North American birds migrate south to these areas, and if the Pampas deer habitat is lost, they are afraid these bird species will also decline. There are approximately 80,000 Pampas deer total, with the majority of them living in Brazil.

Striped hog-nosed skunk species of mammal

The striped hog-nosed skunk is a skunk species from Central and South America. It lives in a wide range of habitats including dry forest scrub and occasionally, in rainforest.

Hooded skunk species of mammal

The hooded skunk is a species of mammal in the family Mephitidae. Mephītis in Latin means "foul odor", μακρός (makrós) in Greek translates to "long" and οὐρά (ourá) translates to "tail".

The cursor grass mouse or cursorial akodont, is a sigmodontine rodent from South America.

Pampas cat Small wild cat

The pampas cat is a small wild cat native to South America, It is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List as habitat conversion and destruction may cause the population to decline in the future.

The Pantanal cat is a Pampas cat subspecies, a small wild cat native to South America. It is named after the Pantanal wetlands in central South America, where it inhabits mainly grassland, shrubland, savannas and deciduous forests.

<i>Podocarpus parlatorei</i> species of plant

Podocarpus parlatorei is a species of tree in the family Podocarpaceae and native to Argentina and Bolivia, where it grows on steep hillsides on the eastern flanks of the Andes. It has been harvested commercially in the past but is now protected under a CITES treaty. The International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed its status as being "near threatened".

Humboldts hog-nosed skunk species of mammal

Humboldt's hog-nosed skunk, also known as the Patagonian hog-nosed skunk, is a type of hog-nosed skunk indigenous to the open grassy areas in the Patagonian regions of South Argentina. It belongs to the order Carnivora and the family Mephitidae.

Molina or La Molina may refer to:

American hog-nosed skunk species of mammal

The American hog-nosed skunk is a species of hog-nosed skunk from Central and North America, and is one of the largest skunks in the world, growing to lengths of up to 2.7 feet (82 cm). Recent work has concluded the western hog-nosed skunk is the same species, and Conepatus leuconotus is the correct name of the merged populations.

References

  1. Emmons, L. & Helgen, K. (2008). "Conepatus chinga". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2008. Retrieved 27 January 2009.
  2. 1 2 3 [Afflerbaugh, K. 2002. "Conepatus chinga" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed September 10, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Conepatus_chinga/]
  3. [Kasper, C. B, et al. "Differential patterns of home-range, net displacement and resting sites use of Conepatus chinga in southern Brazil. Mammalian Biology 77 (2012): 358-362. Academic Search Complete. Web. 14 October. 2013.]
  4. [Castillo, D.F., et al. "Spatial organization of Molina's hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus chinga) in two landscapes of the Pampas grassland of Argentina." Canadian Journal of Zoology 89 (2011): 229-238. Academic Search Complete. Web. 14 October. 2013]
  5. [Felipe Bortolotto, et al. "Feeding Habits of Molina's Hog-Nosed Skunk, Conepatus Chinga (Carnivora: Mephitidae) In The Extreme South of Brazil." Zoologia (Curitiba) 2 (2011): 193. Directory of Open Access Journals. Web. 10 Sept. 2013.]
  6. 1 2 [Castillo, D.F., et al. 2011. "Denning ecology of Molina's hog-nosed skunk in a farmland area in the Pampas grassland of Argentina." The Ecological Society of Japan 26: 845-850. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 November. 2013.]