Rusty-spotted genet

Last updated

Rusty-spotted genet
Panther Genet (Genetta maculata) (30556229264).jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Viverridae
Genus: Genetta
Species:
G. maculata
Binomial name
Genetta maculata
(Gray, 1830)
Rusty-spotted Genet area.png
Rusty-spotted genet range

The rusty-spotted genet (Genetta maculata) [2] , also called panther genet and large-spotted genet, is a genet that is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. It is considered common and therefore listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. [1]

Contents

Characteristics

The rusty-spotted genet has short whitish grey to pale yellow coloured fur with dark spots and a continuous dark line across the back. The spots of the upper two dorsal rows are round or square, brown in the center and darker outside. In head-to-body length it ranges from 42 to 52 cm (17 to 20 in). Its 40 to 53 cm (16 to 21 in) long tail is ringed and has a dark tip. Its feet are of the same colour as the fur. It weighs from 1.3 to 3 kg (2.9 to 6.6 lb). [3] [4]

Behaviour and ecology

Research in southeastern Nigeria revealed that the rusty-spotted genet has an omnivorous diet. It feeds on rodents like giant pouched rats (Cricetomys), Nigerian shrew (Crocidura nigeriae), Temminck's mouse (Mus musculoides), Tullberg's soft-furred mouse (Praomys tulbergi), Peters's striped mouse (Hybomys univittatus), typical striped grass mouse (Lemniscomys striatus), red-eyed dove (Streptopelia semitorquata), common agama (Agama agama), Mabuya skinks, Myriapoda, spiders, Orthoptera and Coleoptera as well as eggs, fruits, berries and seeds. [5]

Taxonomy

In 1830, John Edward Gray first described a rusty-spotted genet using the name Viverra maculata based on a zoological specimen that lived in the menagerie at the Tower of London. [6] In the 19th and 20th centuries, several taxonomists proposed the following species and subspecies for specimens obtained by natural history museums: [2]

Related Research Articles

Viverridae family of mammals

Viverridae is a family of small to medium-sized mammals, the viverrids, comprising 15 genera, which are subdivided into 38 species. This family was named and first described by John Edward Gray in 1821. Viverrids occur all over Africa, southern Europe, and South and Southeast Asia, across the Wallace Line. Their occurrence in Sulawesi and in some of the adjoining islands shows them to be ancient inhabitants of the Old World tropics.

Asiatic linsang genus of mammals

The Asiatic linsang (Prionodon) is a genus comprising two species native to Southeast Asia: the banded linsang and the spotted linsang. Prionodon is considered a sister taxon of the Felidae.

African civet largest representative of the African Viverridae

The African civet is a large viverrid native to sub-Saharan Africa, where it is considered common and widely distributed in woodlands and secondary forests. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List since 2008. In some countries, it is threatened by hunting, and wild-caught individuals are kept for producing civetone for the perfume industry.

Genet (animal) genus of mammals

A genet is a member of the genus Genetta, which consists of 14 to 17 species of small African carnivorans. The common genet is the only genet present in Europe and occurs in the Iberian Peninsula and France.

Crested servaline genet species of mammal

The crested servaline genet, also known as the crested genet, is a genet species endemic to Nigeria and Cameroon. As the population has declined due to loss of habitat, it is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. It was first recorded in the Mamfe Division in Cameroon and initially considered a subspecies of the servaline genet. But now it is regarded as a distinct species.

Servaline genet species of mammal

The servaline genet is a genet species native to Central Africa. As it is widely distributed and considered common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Aquatic genet species of mammal

The aquatic genet is a genet that has only been recorded in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since it is only known from about 30 specimens in zoological collections, it had been listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List since 1996, as it is considered one of Africa's rarest carnivores. In 2015, it has been reassessed as Near Threatened.

Abyssinian genet species of mammal

The Abyssinian genet, also known as the Ethiopian genet, is a genet species native to Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan, and Djibouti. It is listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List. It is one of the least-known genet species.

Angolan genet Species of mammal

The Angolan genet or miombo genet is a genet species endemic to Southern Africa. It is considered common in this region and therefore listed as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List. Little is known about its ecology.

Common genet species of mammal

The common genet is a small viverrid indigenous to Africa that was introduced to southwestern Europe and the Balearic Islands. It is widely distributed north of the Sahara, in savanna zones south of the Sahara to southern Africa and along the coast of Arabia, Yemen and Oman. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Johnstons genet species of mammal

Johnston's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. As it is threatened by deforestation and conversion of rainforest to agriculturally and industrially used land, it is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

Cape genet species of blotched genet, large-spotted genet, or muskeljaatkat in Afrikaans, a carnivorous mammal related to the African linsang and to the civets

The Cape genet, also known as the South African large-spotted genet, is a genet species endemic to South Africa. As it is common and not threatened, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. Like other genets, it is nocturnal and arboreal, preferring to live in the riparian zones of forests, as long as these are not marshy areas.

Haussa genet species of mammal

The Haussa genet is a genet species native to West African savannas. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Viverrinae subfamily of mammals, the viverrids

The Viverrinae represent the largest subfamily within the Viverridae comprising five genera, which are subdivided into 22 species native to Africa and Southeast Asia. This subfamily was denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.

Bourlons genet species of mammal

Bourlon's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. It is known from only 29 zoological specimens in natural history museum and has been described as a new Genetta species in 2003. It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List as the global population is estimated at less than 10,000 mature individuals.

Pardine genet species of mammal

The pardine genet, also known as the West African large spotted genet, is a genet species living in West Africa. As it is widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

References

  1. 1 2 Angelici, F.M.; Gaubert, P. & Do Linh San, E. (2016). "Genetta maculata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2016: e.T41699A45218948. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  2. 1 2 Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Genetta maculata". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 556. ISBN   978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC   62265494.
  3. Gaubert, P., Taylor, P. J., & Veron, G. (2005). Integrative taxonomy and phylogenetic systematics of the genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genetta): a new classification of the most speciose carnivoran genus in Africa. In: Huber, B. A., Sinclair, B. J., Lampe, K.-H. (eds.) African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium of Tropical Biology, Museum König, Bonn. Springer. Pp. 371–383.
  4. Foley, C., Foley, L., Lobora, A., De Luca, D., Msuha, M., Davenport, T. R., & Durant, S. M. (2014). A Field Guide to the Larger Mammals of Tanzania. Princeton University Press.
  5. Angelici, F. M. (2000). "Food habits and resource partitioning of carnivores (Herpestidae, Viverridae) in the rainforests of southeastern Nigeria: preliminary results" (PDF). Revue d'Écologie (La Terre et La Vie). 55: 67–76.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  6. Gray, J. E. (1830). "Fam. Felidae. Gen. Viverra". Spicilegia zoologica; or, original figures and short systematic descriptions of new and unfigured animals. London: Treüttel, Würtz. p. 9.
  7. Du Chaillu, P. (1860). "Descriptions of five new species of mammals discovered in western equatorial Africa". Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History. 7 (29): 298−304.
  8. Heuglin, T. (1866). "Genetta aequatorialis Heugl". Systematische Übersicht der Säugethiere Nordost-Afrika's mit Einschluss der arabischen Küste, des rothen Meeres, der Somáli-und der Nilquellen-Länder, südwärts bis zum vierten Grade nördlicher Breite. Wien: Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften. p. 23.
  9. Matschie, P. (1902). "Über die individuellen und geographischen Abänderungen der Ginsterkatzen". In Matschie, P. (ed.). Verhandlungen des V. Internationalen Zoologen-Congresses. Jena: Gustav Fischer. pp. 1128–1144.
  10. Neumann, O. R. (1902). "Über einige neue Arten der Ginsterkatzen". Sitzungsberichte der Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde zu Berlin. 8: 181–184.
  11. Thomas, O. and Schwann, H. (1906). "The Rudd exploration of South Africa. − V. List of mammals obtained by Mr. Grant in North East Transvaal". Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London: 575−591.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  12. Hollister, N. (1916). "Descriptions of a new genus and eight new species and subspecies of African mammals" (PDF). Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. 66: 1−8.
  13. Cabrera, A. (1921). "Algunos carnívoros africanos nuevos". Boletín de la Real Sociedad Española de Historia Natural. 21: 261−264.
  14. Roberts, A. (1924). "Some additions to the list of South African mammals" (PDF). Annals of the Transvaal Museum. 10 (2): 59−76.
  15. Schwarz, E. (1929). "On two new genets from the upper Congo". Annals and Magazine of Natural History. Series 10. 3 (13): 47−48.
  16. Roberts, A. P. (1932). "reliminary description of fifty-seven new forms of South African mammals" (PDF). Annals of the Transvaal Museum. 15 (1): 1−19.
  17. Funaioli, U. and Simonetta, A.M. (1960). "Spedizione biologica in Somalia, 1959. Risultati zoologici. Carnivora". Monitore Zoologico Italiano. 68: 58−79.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  18. Crawford-Cabral, J. (1970). "As genetas da Africa Central". Boletim do Instituto de Investigação Científica de Angola. 7: 3–23.