Crested servaline genet

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Crested servaline genet
Genetta-cristata-rose.jpg
Illustration of a crested servaline genet
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Viverridae
Genus: Genetta
Species:
G. cristata
Binomial name
Genetta cristata
Hayman, 1940
Crested Servaline Genet area.png
Crested servaline genet range
Synonyms
  • Genetta bini Rosevear, 1974 [2]

The crested servaline genet (Genetta cristata), also known as the crested genet, is a genet species endemic to Nigeria and Cameroon. As the population has declined due to loss of habitat, it is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. [1] It was first recorded in the Mamfe Division in Cameroon and initially considered a subspecies of the servaline genet (Genetta servalina). [3] But now it is regarded as a distinct species. [4]

Contents

Characteristics

The crested servaline genet is a rather small and slender genet with relatively long legs and a narrow face. Its khaki colored fur is short, soft and dense with dark spots that are densely and evenly distributed. Its long tail is banded with wide black bands and thin whitish bands. Its crest on the back of the neck does not extend onto the back. [5]

Its feet are dark. It has a dark discontinuous mid-dorsal line with relatively long hairs that form a nuchal crest. [6]

Distribution and habitat

The crested servaline genet occurs in southern Nigeria from the Niger Delta east into Cameroon to the Sanaga River. It inhabits scrub, low tangled vegetation and bare ground below trees in tall deciduous forest. Occasionally it has also been recorded in secondary and montane forest. [1]

In Nigeria it is associated with primary dry forest, bush–mango plantations inside the forest, and to a lesser extent to secondary dry forest and primary flooded forest. It avoids suburban areas, pineapple plantations, bushlands and oil-palm plantations. [7] It is restricted to lower elevations from sea level to about 1,000 m (3,300 ft) elevation. Its presence has been predicted in Gabon and Republic of Congo, but not been confirmed. [8]

Threats

The crested servaline genet is threatened by loss of habitat. The major areas of its occurrence in the Cross River State Forests is being converted into agriculturally used land; oil is produced in the Niger Delta. It may also be subject to pressure from intensive hunting. [1]

Related Research Articles

Viverridae family of mammals

Viverridae is a family of small to medium-sized mammals, the viverrids, comprising 15 genera, which are subdivided into 38 species. This family was named and first described by John Edward Gray in 1821. Viverrids occur all over Africa, southern Europe, and South and Southeast Asia, across the Wallace Line. Their occurrence in Sulawesi and in some of the adjoining islands shows them to be ancient inhabitants of the Old World tropics.

Genet (animal) genus of mammals

A genet is a member of the genus Genetta, which consists of 14 to 17 species of small African carnivorans. The common genet is the only genet present in Europe and occurs in the Iberian Peninsula and France.

Servaline genet species of mammal

The servaline genet is a genet species native to Central Africa. As it is widely distributed and considered common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Aquatic genet species of mammal

The aquatic genet is a genet that has only been recorded in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since it is only known from about 30 specimens in zoological collections, it had been listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List since 1996, as it is considered one of Africa's rarest carnivores. In 2015, it has been reassessed as Near Threatened.

Abyssinian genet species of mammal

The Abyssinian genet, also known as the Ethiopian genet, is a genet species native to Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan, and Djibouti. It is listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List. It is one of the least-known genet species.

Angolan genet Species of mammal

The Angolan genet or miombo genet is a genet species endemic to Southern Africa. It is considered common in this region and therefore listed as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List. Little is known about its ecology.

Common genet species of mammal

The common genet is a small viverrid indigenous to Africa that was introduced to southwestern Europe and the Balearic Islands. It is widely distributed north of the Sahara, in savanna zones south of the Sahara to southern Africa and along the coast of Arabia, Yemen and Oman. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Eupleridae family of carnivorans

Eupleridae is a family of carnivorans endemic to Madagascar and comprising 10 known living species in seven genera, commonly known as euplerids, Malagasy mongooses or Malagasy carnivorans. The best known species is the fossa, in the subfamily Euplerinae. All species of Euplerinae were formerly classified as viverrids, while all species in the subfamily Galidiinae were classified as herpestids.

Rusty-spotted genet species of mammal

The rusty-spotted genet, also called panther genet and large-spotted genet, is a genet that is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. It is considered common and therefore listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Johnstons genet species of mammal

Johnston's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. As it is threatened by deforestation and conversion of rainforest to agriculturally and industrially used land, it is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

Giant forest genet species of mammal

The giant forest genet, also known as the giant genet, is a genet species endemic to the Congo Basin. As it is considered as widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Black-footed mongoose species of mammal

The black-footed mongoose is a mongoose species native to Central Africa, where it inhabits deep deciduous forests from eastern Nigeria to the southern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has been listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List since 2008. It is omnivorous and feeds on ants, termites, Orthoptera, small rodents, frogs, lizards and fruits. It is mostly solitary and nocturnal.

Cape genet species of blotched genet, large-spotted genet, or muskeljaatkat in Afrikaans, a carnivorous mammal related to the African linsang and to the civets

The Cape genet, also known as the South African large-spotted genet, is a genet species endemic to South Africa. As it is common and not threatened, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. Like other genets, it is nocturnal and arboreal, preferring to live in the riparian zones of forests, as long as these are not marshy areas.

Haussa genet species of mammal

The Haussa genet is a genet species native to West African savannas. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

The Zanzibar servaline genet is a recently discovered subspecies of servaline genet endemic to Unguja Island in the Tanzanian archipelago of Zanzibar. Its conservation status is uncertain.

Feliformia suborder of mammals in the order Carnivora

Feliformia is a suborder within the order Carnivora consisting of "cat-like" carnivorans, including cats, hyenas, mongooses, viverrids, and related taxa. Feliformia stands in contrast to the other suborder of Carnivora, Caniformia.

Viverrinae subfamily of mammals, the viverrids

The Viverrinae represent the largest subfamily within the Viverridae comprising five genera, which are subdivided into 22 species native to Africa and Southeast Asia. This subfamily was denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.

Bourlons genet species of mammal

Bourlon's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. It is known from only 29 zoological specimens in natural history museum and has been described as a new Genetta species in 2003. It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List as the global population is estimated at less than 10,000 mature individuals.

Pardine genet species of mammal

The pardine genet, also known as the West African large spotted genet, is a genet species living in West Africa. As it is widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Gaubert, P.; Angelici, F.M. & Do Linh San, E. (2015). "Genetta cristata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2015: e.T8998A45198406. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-4.RLTS.T8998A45198406.en . Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  2. Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Genetta cristata". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 532–628. ISBN   978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC   62265494.
  3. Hayman, R. W. (1940). Genetta servalina cristata. Page 686 in: Sanderson, I. T. (ed). The Mammals of the North Gameroons Forest Area. Being the Results of the Percy Sladen Expedition to the Mamfe Division of the British Cameroons. The Transactions of the Zoological Society of London 24 (7): 623–726.
  4. Gaubert, P., Taylor, P. J., & Veron, G. (2005). Integrative taxonomy and phylogenetic systematics of the genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genetta): a new classification of the most speciose carnivoran genus in Africa. In: Huber, B. A., Sinclair, B. J., Lampe, K.-H. (eds.) African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium of Tropical Biology, Museum König, Bonn. Springer. Pp. 371–383.
  5. Kingdon, J. (1997). The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals . Academic Press. p.  269. ISBN   0-12-408355-2.
  6. Gaubert, P., Taylor, P. J., Veron, G. (2005). Integrative taxonomy and phylogenetic systematics of the genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genetta): a new classification of the most speciose carnivoran genus in Africa. In: BA Huber, BJ Sinclair, K-H Lampe (eds.) African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems. Proceedings 5th International Symposium Tropical Biology, Museum König, Bonn. Springer Verlag.
  7. Angelici, F.M. and Luiselli, L. (2005). Habitat associations and dietary relationships between two genets, Genetta maculata and Genetta cristata. Revue d'Écologie (La Terre et la Vie) 60: 341–354.
  8. Gaubert, P., Papes, M. and Peterson, A.T. (2006). Natural history collections and the conservation of poorly known taxa: Ecological niche modeling in central African rainforest genets (Genetta spp.). Biological Conservation 130: 106–117.