Spotted linsang

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Spotted linsang

Temporal Range:

Middle Miocene-Present

Prionodon pardicolor - Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology - DSC02486.JPG
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Prionodontidae
Genus: Prionodon
Species:
P. pardicolor [2]
Binomial name
Prionodon pardicolor [2]
Hodgson, 1842
Spotted Linsang area.png
Spotted linsang range

The spotted linsang (Prionodon pardicolor) is a linsang, a tree-dwelling carnivorous mammal, native to much of Southeast Asia. It is widely, though usually sparsely, recorded, and listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. [1]

Contents

Characteristics

The spotted linsang resembles the banded linsang in its long, slender body, short limbs, elongated neck and head, and long tail. The ground colour ranges from dusky brown to light buff. Two long stripes extend from behind the ears to the shoulders or beyond, and two shorter stripes run along the neck. Three to four longitudinal rows of spots adorn the back, their size decreasing towards the belly. The fore legs are spotted to the paw, the hind legs to the hock. The cylindrical tail has eight or nine broad dark rings, separated by narrow white rings. The feet have five digits, and the area between the pads is covered with hair. The claws are retractile, claw sheaths are present on the fore paws, but the hind-paws have protective lobes of skin. [3] It weighs about 1 lb (0.45 kg) and measures in length from 14–15 in (36–38 cm), and the tail 12–13 in (30–33 cm). Its height is about 5–5.5 in (13–14 cm), the girth of its chest 5.75 in (14.6 cm), and length of head to the occiput about 3 in (7.6 cm). [4]

Distribution and habitat

The range of the spotted linsang includes eastern Nepal, Sikkim, Assam and Bengal in India, Bhutan, northeastern Myanmar, northern Thailand, Laos, northern Vietnam, and western Sichuan, Yunnan Guizhou and southwestern Guangxi in southern China. It is uncommon to rare throughout this range. [3] It is rarely observed in northern Bengal. [5] It primarily inhabits evergreen forests and shrubland. A large portion of this habitat is not protected, and this may cause the spotted linsang to be threatened with extinction due to habitat loss. [6]

Ecology and behaviour

The spotted linsang is nocturnal, solitary, and at least partly arboreal. [7] It uses hollows in trees as resting and denning sites. [4] It hunts on the ground and in trees and feeds on rodents, frogs and snakes. It has also been observed feeding on carcass. [3]

Taxonomy

The Asiatic linsangs (Prionodon) are not, as was traditionally thought, members of the Viverridae (which does include the African linsangs), and may instead be the closest living relatives of the family Felidae. They have been placed in their own family, the Prionodontidae. [8]

Related Research Articles

Asiatic linsang genus of mammals

The Asiatic linsang (Prionodon) is a genus comprising two species native to Southeast Asia: the banded linsang and the spotted linsang. Prionodon is considered a sister taxon of the Felidae.

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Malabar large-spotted civet species of mammal

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Eastern spotted skunk species of mammal

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Back-striped weasel species of mammal

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Genet (animal) genus of mammals

A genet is a member of the genus Genetta, which consists of 14 to 17 species of small African carnivorans. The common genet is the only genet present in Europe and occurs in the Iberian Peninsula and France.

Servaline genet species of mammal

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Aquatic genet species of mammal

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Crab-eating mongoose species of mammal

The crab-eating mongoose is a mongoose species ranging from the northeastern Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia to southern China and Taiwan. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Banded linsang species of mammal

The banded linsang is a linsang, a tree-dwelling carnivorous mammal native to the Sundaic region of Southeast Asia.

Large-spotted civet species of mammal

The large-spotted civet is a viverrid native to Southeast Asia that is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Malayan civet species of mammal

The Malayan civet, also known as the Malay civet and Oriental civet, is a viverrid native to the Malay Peninsula and the islands of Sumatra, Bangka, Borneo, the Riau Archipelago, and the Philippines. It is listed as "Least Concern" by IUCN as it is a relatively widely distributed, appears to be tolerant of degraded habitats, and occurs in a number of protected areas.

Large Indian civet species of mammal

The large Indian civet is a viverrid native to South and Southeast Asia. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. The global population is considered decreasing mainly because of trapping-driven declines in heavily hunted and fragmented areas, notably in China, and the heavy trade as wild meat.

Jacksons mongoose species of mammal

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Cape genet species of blotched genet, large-spotted genet, or muskeljaatkat in Afrikaans, a carnivorous mammal related to the African linsang and to the civets

The Cape genet, also known as the South African large-spotted genet, is a genet species endemic to South Africa. As it is common and not threatened, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. Like other genets, it is nocturnal and arboreal, preferring to live in the riparian zones of forests, as long as these are not marshy areas.

Central African oyan species of mammal

The Central African oyan, also called Central African linsang, is a linsang species native to Central Africa.

Viverrinae subfamily of mammals, the viverrids

The Viverrinae represent the largest subfamily within the Viverridae comprising five genera, which are subdivided into 22 species native to Africa and Southeast Asia. This subfamily was denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.

Binturong Species of mammal in the family Viverridae, native to South and Southeast Asia

The binturong, also known as bearcat, is a viverrid native to South and Southeast Asia. It is uncommon in much of its range, and has been assessed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List because of a declining population trend that is estimated at more than 30% since the mid 1980s.

<i>Poiana</i> (genus) genus of mammals

The African linsangs also known as oyans are two species classified in the mammalian subfamily Viverrinae, in the family Viverridae. There is one genus, Poiana.

Linsangs is a name applied to four species of tree-dwelling carnivorous mammals. The name of these species originated in the Javanese language as, linsang or wlinsang, and previously, was translated incorrectly in English dictionaries as, "otter". The two African species belong to the family Viverridae and the two Asiatic species belong to the family Prionodontidae. Formerly, both linsang genera were placed in the subfamily Viverrinae, along with several other genera, but recent research suggests that their relationships may be somewhat different.

References

  1. 1 2 Duckworth, J.W.; Lau, M.; Choudhury, A.; Chutipong, W.; Timmins, R.J.; Willcox, D.H.A.; Chan, B.; Long, B. & Roberton, S. (2016). "Prionodon pardicolor". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2016: e.T41706A45219917.
  2. 1 2 Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Species Prionodon pardicolor". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 532–628. ISBN   978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC   62265494.
  3. 1 2 3 Van Rompaey, H. (1995). The Spotted Linsang, Prionodon pardicolor. Small Carnivore Conservation 13: 10–13.
  4. 1 2 Hodgson, B. H. (1847). "Observations on the manners and structure of Prionodon pardicolor". Calcutta Journal of Natural History. 8: 40–45.
  5. Choudhury, A. U. (1999). Conservation of small carnivores (mustelids, viverrids, herpestids and one ailurid) in north Bengal, India. Small Carnivore Conservation 20: 15–17.
  6. Jennings, A.P. and Veron, G. (2015). "Predicted distributions, niche comparisons, and conservation status of the spotted linsang (Prionodon pardicolor) and banded linsang (Prionodon linsang)". Mammal Research. 60 (2): 107−116.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  7. Chua, M.A.H.; Lim, K.K.P. (2017). "Spotted Linsang Prionodon pardicolor at Nam Et - Phou Louey National Biodiversity Conservation Area, Laos" (PDF). Southeast Asia Vertebrate Records.
  8. Philippe Gaubert and Geraldine Veron, "Exhaustive sample set among Viverridae reveals the sister-group of felids: the linsangs as a case of extreme morphological convergence within Feliformia", The Royal Society (October 15, 2003).