Stripe-necked mongoose

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Stripe-necked mongoose
2007-stripe-necked-mongoose.jpg
Adult from Nagarhole National Park
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Herpestidae
Genus: Herpestes
Species:
H. vitticollis
Binomial name
Herpestes vitticollis
Bennett, 1835
Stripe-necked Mongoose area.png
Stripe-necked mongoose range

The stripe-necked mongoose (Herpestes vitticollis) is a species of mongoose found in southern India to Sri Lanka.

In biology, a species ( ) is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank of an organism, as well as a unit of biodiversity. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which any two individuals of the appropriate sexes or mating types can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. Other ways of defining species include their karyotype, DNA sequence, morphology, behaviour or ecological niche. In addition, paleontologists use the concept of the chronospecies since fossil reproduction cannot be examined. While these definitions may seem adequate, when looked at more closely they represent problematic species concepts. For example, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, and in a ring species. Also, among organisms that reproduce only asexually, the concept of a reproductive species breaks down, and each clone is potentially a microspecies.

Mongoose family of mammals

Mongoose is the popular English name for 29 of the 34 species in the 14 genera of the family Herpestidae, which are small feliform carnivorans native to southern Eurasia and mainland Africa. The other five species in the family are the four kusimanses in the genus Crossarchus, and the species Suricata suricatta, commonly called meerkat in English.

India Country in South Asia

India, also known as the Republic of India, is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh largest country by area and with more than 1.3 billion people, it is the second most populous country as well as the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the northeast; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives, while its Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Contents

The stripe-necked mongoose is the largest of the Asiatic mongooses. The range distribution of the Stripe-necked Mongoose was restricted to the southern part of India and Sri Lanka. The Stripe-necked Mongoose was recorded from many parts of the Western Ghats. Distribution of the Stripe-necked Mongoose in Similipal Tiger Reserve, Odisha was reported by. Similipal is the southeastern extension of the Chota Nagpur plateau. Although there was a sighting record, there were no specimens from the Eastern Ghats. Five records confirm the Stripe-necked Mongoose in Papikonda National Park and adjacent reserve forests,first report from the Eastern Ghats.It has a stout body set on short legs. It is easily distinguished by the black stripe that runs laterally on both sides of its neck. The body coloration is a rusty brown to grizzled grey. The relatively short tail is mostly black, with grey at the base. The stripe-necked mongoose feeds on frogs, crabs, mouse deer, hares, rodents, fowl, and reptiles. This mongoose species is more diurnal in habits. They prefer forested areas near a fresh water source. They are often found in swamps and rice fields.

Asia Earths largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres

Asia is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres. It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe and the continental landmass of Afro-Eurasia with both Europe and Africa. Asia covers an area of 44,579,000 square kilometres (17,212,000 sq mi), about 30% of Earth's total land area and 8.7% of the Earth's total surface area. The continent, which has long been home to the majority of the human population, was the site of many of the first civilizations. Asia is notable for not only its overall large size and population, but also dense and large settlements, as well as vast barely populated regions. Its 4.5 billion people constitute roughly 60% of the world's population.

Subspecies

There are two subspecies. H. vitticollis vitticollis is from the provinces of Western Ghats, Coorg and Kerala, and has more of a reddish tint to its fur. The other, H. vitticollis inornatus, is found in the Kanara province, and lacks a reddish tint to its fur. [2]

See also

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References

  1. ^ 1.Balaji, K. & J.E. Satyanarayana (2016). The first record of Stripe-necked Mongoose Herpestes vitticollis Bennett, 1835 (Mammalia: Carnivora: Herpestidae)from the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(14): 9684–9686; https://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3123.8.14.9684-9686
  2. Choudbury, A.; Wozencraft, C.; Muddapa, D. & Yonzon, P. (2008). "Herpestes vitticollis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 22 March 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of least concern
  3. Pocock, R.I. (1941). The fauna of British India, including Ceylon and Burma. Mammalia, 2nd Edition, 2. Taylor & Francis, London, U.K.
  4. Prater, S.H. (1971). The Book of Indian Animals – 3rd Edition.Bombay Natural History Society. Oxford University Press, Bombay, 324pp.
  5. Corbet, G.B. & J.E. Hill (1992). Mammals of the Indo-Malayan Region: A Systematic Review. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
  6. Van Rompaey, H. & M.N. Jayakumar (2003). The Stripe-necked Mongoose, Herpestes vitticollis. Small Carnivore Conservation 28: 14–17.
  7. Mudappa, D. (2013). Herpestids, viverrids and mustelids, pp. 471–498. In: Johnsingh, A.J.T. & N. Manjrekar (eds.). Mammals of South Asia -1. Universities Press, Hyderabad, India.
  8. Menon, V. (2014). Indian Mammals - A Field Guide. Hachette India, Gurgaon, India, 528pp.
  9. Sreehari, R. & P.O. Nameer (2016). Small carnivores of Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, southern Western Ghats, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(11): 9306–9315; https://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2311.8.11.9306-9315
  10. Nayak, A.K., M.V. Nair & P.P. Mohapatra (2014). Stripenecked Mongoose Herpestes vitticollis in Odisha, eastern India: A biogeographically significant record. Small Carnivore Conservation 51: 71–73.
  11. Ray, G.C. (2005). Geography of Orissa. Kitab Mahal, Cuttack, India.
  12. Allen, P.R. (1911). Mongooses in the Eastern Ghats. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 21: 237–238.

References

  1. Choudbury, A.; Wozencraft, C.; Muddapa, D. & Yonzon, P. (2008). "Herpestes vitticollis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature . Retrieved 22 March 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of least concern
  2. 1.Balaji, K. & J.E. Satyanarayana (2016). The first record of Stripe-necked Mongoose Herpestes vitticollis Bennett, 1835 (Mammalia: Carnivora: Herpestidae)from the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(14): 9684–9686; https://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.3123.8.14.9684-9686