Pardine genet

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Pardine genet
Pardine Genet at WWP.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Viverridae
Genus: Genetta
Species:
G. pardina
Binomial name
Genetta pardina
Pardine Genet area.png
Pardine genet range
Synonyms
  • Genetta amerGray, 1843 [2]
  • Genetta dubiaMatschie, 1902
  • Genetta genettoidesTemminck, 1853
  • Genetta pantherinaHamilton-Smith, 1842

The pardine genet (Genetta pardina), also known as the West African large spotted genet, is a genet species living in West Africa. As it is widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. [1]

Contents

Characteristics

The pardine genet's fur is yellowish grey with round black spots, which are bigger on the hind legs than on the shoulders. Its head is more reddish, and the muzzle brownish. It has white spots under each eye and below the chin. Its ears are grey. Its tail has six to seven narrow white and six to seven broader black rings. The tip of the tail is black. [3]

Measurements of adult males range from 410 to 553 mm (16.1 to 21.8 in) in head and body with a 390 to 490 cm (150 to 190 in) long tail. Adult females range from 410 to 530 mm (16 to 21 in) in head and body with a 420 to 450 cm (170 to 180 in) long tail. [4]

Distribution and habitat

Pardine genets are distributed from Senegal eastwards to Ghana, where the Volta River is possibly a barrier to dispersal. They live in rainforests, gallery forests, moist woodlands, but also in plantations. They also venture into suburbs. [1]

Ecology and behavior

Pardine genets are solitary, and active at night. They are very adept at climbing trees. [5]

Threats

Major threats to pardine genets are not known. [1] Heads and skins of pardine genets have been recorded in local markets in Benin, where they are used as fetish. [5]

In captivity

Captive pardine genets are currently kept in 5 collections in the UK, Shepreth Wildlife Park, Wingham Wildlife Park, All Things Wild, Wild Animal Adventures in Stockton and Wild Discovery in Wrea Green. Napoli Zoo in Italy has also kept them since 2015. [6]

Taxonomy

This pardine genet was considered synonymous with other species of large-spotted genets, namely the Rusty-spotted genet Genetta maculata and the Cape Genet Genetta tigrina, but all three are now each recognised as distinct species. [1]

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Servaline genet species of mammal

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Aquatic genet species of mammal

The aquatic genet is a genet that has only been recorded in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since it is only known from about 30 specimens in zoological collections, it had been listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List since 1996, as it is considered one of Africa's rarest carnivores. In 2015, it has been reassessed as Near Threatened.

Abyssinian genet species of mammal

The Abyssinian genet, also known as the Ethiopian genet, is a genet species native to Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan, and Djibouti. It is listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List. It is one of the least-known genet species.

Angolan genet Species of mammal

The Angolan genet or miombo genet is a genet species endemic to Southern Africa. It is considered common in this region and therefore listed as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List. Little is known about its ecology.

Common genet species of mammal

The common genet is a small viverrid indigenous to Africa that was introduced to southwestern Europe and the Balearic Islands. It is widely distributed north of the Sahara, in savanna zones south of the Sahara to southern Africa and along the coast of Arabia, Yemen and Oman. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Rusty-spotted genet species of mammal

The rusty-spotted genet, also called panther genet and large-spotted genet, is a genet that is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. It is considered common and therefore listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Johnstons genet species of mammal

Johnston's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. As it is threatened by deforestation and conversion of rainforest to agriculturally and industrially used land, it is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

Giant forest genet species of mammal

The giant forest genet, also known as the giant genet, is a genet species endemic to the Congo Basin. As it is considered as widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Cape genet species of blotched genet, large-spotted genet, or muskeljaatkat in Afrikaans, a carnivorous mammal related to the African linsang and to the civets

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Haussa genet species of mammal

The Haussa genet is a genet species native to West African savannas. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Central African oyan species of mammal

The Central African oyan, also called Central African linsang, is a linsang species native to Central Africa.

Wildlife of Benin Natural flora and fauna of Benin

Benin has varied resources of wildlife comprising flora and fauna, which are primarily protected in its two contiguous protected areas of the Pendjari National Park and W National Park. The former is known for many species of avifauna and the latter park is rich in mammals and predators. In addition, many other forest reserves are noted in the country but are not easily accessible, well protected or adequately surveyed for its wildlife resources. The protected area system of Benin defined as National Protected Area System is situated in the northern Benin, mostly with a woody savanna ecosystem. It covers 10.3% of the national territory and is part of the three nation transboundary W-Arly-Pendjari (WAP) complex.

Bourlons genet species of mammal

Bourlon's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. It is known from only 29 zoological specimens in natural history museum and has been described as a new Genetta species in 2003. It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List as the global population is estimated at less than 10,000 mature individuals.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Gaubert, P. & Do Linh San, E. (2016). "Genetta pardina". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2016: e.T136437A45221360. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  2. Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Genetta pardina". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 554–557. ISBN   978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC   62265494.
  3. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, I. (1832). Genette. Genetta. Cuv. Études Zoologiques. Lequien Fils, Paris.
  4. Gaubert, P. and Dunham, A. E. (2013). Genetta pardina Pardine Genet (West African Large-spotted Genet). In: J. Kingdon and M. Hoffmann (eds.) The Mammals of Africa. V. Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, pp. 237–238. Bloomsbury, London, UK.
  5. 1 2 Djagoun, C. A. M. S., & Gaubert, P. (2009). Small carnivorans from southern Benin: a preliminary assessment of diversity and hunting pressure. Small Carnivore Conservation 40: 1–10.
  6. "ZootierlisteHomepage". 2017. Retrieved 29 June 2017.