Abyssinian genet

Last updated

Abyssinian genet
Neue Wirbelthiere zu der Fauna von Abyssinien gehorig (1835) Genetta abyssinica.png
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Suborder: Feliformia
Family: Viverridae
Genus: Genetta
Species:
G. abyssinica [2]
Binomial name
Genetta abyssinica [2]
(Rüppell), 1835 [3]
Abyssinian Genet area.png
Abyssinian genet range

The Abyssinian genet (Genetta abyssinica), also known as the Ethiopian genet, is a genet species native to Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan, and Djibouti. It is listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List. [1] It is one of the least-known genet species. [4]

Contents

Characteristics

The Abyssinian genet has a shortened face, short legs and a moderately long tail, which is nearly as long as head and body. Its short, coarse fur is pale sandy in colour with five longitudinal black stripes on the back. The spots on the lower flanks are also distinctly elongated, resembling stripes rather than spots. The tail is marked by at least seven pale rings, separated by seven or eight narrow black rings and has a dark tip. It is also distinguished by the lack of hair between the metacarpal pad and digital pads on the forepaws. It's heady-to body size is 40 to 50 cm (16 to 20 in) with a 40 to 45 cm (16 to 18 in) long tail. The dental formula is: 3.1.4.23.1.4.2 [5] [6]

Distribution and habitat

The Abyssinian genet inhabits coastal plains, Afromontane grasslands, and mountain moorlands. [7] In Ethiopia, Abyssinian genets were observed up to 3,750 m (12,300 ft) in the Abune Yosef massif. [8]

Threats

The population is likely being reduced due to habitat fragmentation, as many areas with historical records have been turned into croplands. [4] Prior to the Second World War the skins of Abyssinian genets were recorded for sale in markets in Addis Ababa market, it is unknown whether there is still a market for the skins of this species. In general this species is too poorly known to properly assess its conservation status. [1]

Related Research Articles

Viverridae family of mammals

Viverridae is a family of small to medium-sized mammals, the viverrids, comprising 15 genera, which are subdivided into 38 species. This family was named and first described by John Edward Gray in 1821. Viverrids occur all over Africa, southern Europe, and South and Southeast Asia, across the Wallace Line. Their occurrence in Sulawesi and in some of the adjoining islands shows them to be ancient inhabitants of the Old World tropics.

African palm civet species of mammal

The African palm civet, also known as the two-spotted palm civet, is a small feliform mammal widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

African civet largest representative of the African Viverridae

The African civet is a large viverrid native to sub-Saharan Africa, where it is considered common and widely distributed in woodlands and secondary forests. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List since 2008. In some countries, it is threatened by hunting, and wild-caught individuals are kept for producing civetone for the perfume industry.

Genet (animal) genus of mammals

A genet is a member of the genus Genetta, which consists of 14 to 17 species of small African carnivorans. The common genet is the only genet present in Europe and occurs in the Iberian Peninsula and France.

Crested servaline genet species of mammal

The crested servaline genet, also known as the crested genet, is a genet species endemic to Nigeria and Cameroon. As the population has declined due to loss of habitat, it is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. It was first recorded in the Mamfe Division in Cameroon and initially considered a subspecies of the servaline genet. But now it is regarded as a distinct species.

Servaline genet species of mammal

The servaline genet is a genet species native to Central Africa. As it is widely distributed and considered common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Aquatic genet species of mammal

The aquatic genet is a genet that has only been recorded in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since it is only known from about 30 specimens in zoological collections, it had been listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List since 1996, as it is considered one of Africa's rarest carnivores. In 2015, it has been reassessed as Near Threatened.

Angolan genet Species of mammal

The Angolan genet or miombo genet is a genet species endemic to Southern Africa. It is considered common in this region and therefore listed as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List. Little is known about its ecology.

Common genet species of mammal

The common genet is a small viverrid indigenous to Africa that was introduced to southwestern Europe and the Balearic Islands. It is widely distributed north of the Sahara, in savanna zones south of the Sahara to southern Africa and along the coast of Arabia, Yemen and Oman. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Rusty-spotted genet species of mammal

The rusty-spotted genet, also called panther genet and large-spotted genet, is a genet that is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. It is considered common and therefore listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Johnstons genet species of mammal

Johnston's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. As it is threatened by deforestation and conversion of rainforest to agriculturally and industrially used land, it is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

Giant forest genet species of mammal

The giant forest genet, also known as the giant genet, is a genet species endemic to the Congo Basin. As it is considered as widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Cape genet species of blotched genet, large-spotted genet, or muskeljaatkat in Afrikaans, a carnivorous mammal related to the African linsang and to the civets

The Cape genet, also known as the South African large-spotted genet, is a genet species endemic to South Africa. As it is common and not threatened, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. Like other genets, it is nocturnal and arboreal, preferring to live in the riparian zones of forests, as long as these are not marshy areas.

Haussa genet species of mammal

The Haussa genet is a genet species native to West African savannas. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Central African oyan species of mammal

The Central African oyan, also called Central African linsang, is a linsang species native to Central Africa.

Ethiopian highland hare species of mammal

The Ethiopian highland hare is a medium-sized species of mammal in the rabbit and hare family, Leporidae. Its dorsal pelage is grizzled, buff white and spotted and streaked with black, while its belly fur is pure white and fluffy. It is endemic to the Ethiopian Highlands, ranging over the Afroalpine regions of the Shoa, Bale, and Arsi Provinces of Ethiopia. A herbivore, it mostly feeds on moorland grasses. The IUCN rates it as a species of least concern.

Viverrinae subfamily of mammals, the viverrids

The Viverrinae represent the largest subfamily within the Viverridae comprising five genera, which are subdivided into 22 species native to Africa and Southeast Asia. This subfamily was denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.

Bourlons genet species of mammal

Bourlon's genet is a genet species native to the Upper Guinean forests. It is known from only 29 zoological specimens in natural history museum and has been described as a new Genetta species in 2003. It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List as the global population is estimated at less than 10,000 mature individuals.

Pardine genet species of mammal

The pardine genet, also known as the West African large spotted genet, is a genet species living in West Africa. As it is widely distributed and common, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Gaubert, P.; Duckworth, J.W. & Do Linh San, E. (2016). "Genetta abyssinica". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . IUCN. 2016: e.T8994A45198149. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T8994A45198149.en . Retrieved 22 October 2018.
  2. 1 2 Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Genetta abyssinica". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 554. ISBN   978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC   62265494.
  3. Rüppell, E. (1835). "Viverra abyssinica". Neue Wirbelthiere zu der Fauna von Abyssinien gehörig. Frankfurt: Siegmund Schmerber. pp. 33–35.
  4. 1 2 Balakrishnan, M.; Afework, B. (2008). "A road kill of the Ethiopian Genet Genetta abyssinica along the Addis Ababa–Dira Dewa Highway, Ethiopia". Small Carnivore Conservation. 39: 37–38.
  5. Coetzee, C. G. (1977). "Order Carnivora. Part 8". In Meester, J.; Setzer, H. W. (eds.). The mammals of Africa: an identification manual. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.
  6. Kingdon, J. (1997). The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals. Princeton University Press. p. 270. ISBN   069111692X.
  7. Gaubert, P. (2013). Genetta abyssinica Ethiopian Genet. In: J. Kingdon and M. Hoffmann (eds.) The Mammals of Africa. V. Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, pp. 216–218. Bloomsbury, London, UK.
  8. Diaz Behrens, G. and Van Rompaey, H. (2002). The Ethiopian Genet, Genetta abyssinica (Rüppell 1836) (Carnivora, Viverridae): ecology and phenotypic aspects. Small Carnivore Conservation 27: 23–28.