Referendums in New Zealand

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Referendums (or referenda) are held only occasionally by the Government of New Zealand. Referendums may be government-initiated or held in accordance with the Electoral Act 1993 or the Citizens Initiated Referenda Act 1993. Ten referendums have been held so far (excluding referendums on alcohol licensing, which were held triennially between 1894 and 1989). Seven were government-led, and three were indicative citizen initiatives.

A referendum is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is invited to vote on a particular proposal. This may result in the adoption of a new law. In some countries, it is synonymous with a plebiscite or a vote on a ballot question.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. It has a size of 267,710 km2 (103,360 sq mi) and is the world's 6th largest island country. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Electoral Act 1993 Act of Parliament in New Zealand

The Electoral Act 1993 "establishes the electoral agencies, electoral system, election processes, how MPs are replaced between elections, registration processes for political parties and logos, enrolment and electoral roll requirements, and provides for the Māori Electoral option, and the Representation Commission." One such agency is the Electoral Commission which is responsible, among other things, for the administration of parliamentary elections and referenda.

Contents

Government referendums

The government of New Zealand may, at any time, call for a referendum on any issue. This requires enabling legislation to determine whether the outcome will be binding on the government or merely indicative. This allows parliamentary scrutiny of the issue and wording of the question. There is no constraint on whether an issue is to be decided by the New Zealand Parliament or by the public, except for where the reserved provisions of the Electoral Act 1993 are engaged. Section 268 of the Electoral Act 1993 protects some of the provisions of the Act from amendment except in accordance with s 268(2) which requires a majority vote in a referendum of a 75% majority of Members of Parliament. [1] The protected provisions include, inter alia, the term of Parliament, the voting age and the voting method. The provision itself is not protected from ordinary amendment or repeal.

New Zealand Parliament legislative body of New Zealand

The New Zealand Parliament is the legislature of New Zealand, consisting of the Queen of New Zealand (Queen-in-Parliament) and the New Zealand House of Representatives. The Queen is usually represented by her governor-general. Before 1951, there was an upper chamber, the New Zealand Legislative Council. The New Zealand Parliament was established in 1854 and is one of the oldest continuously functioning legislatures in the world. It has met in Wellington, the capital of New Zealand, since 1865.

This has led to the sporadic use of referendums, partly because there is no constitutional requirement, as there is in other countries like Australia or Switzerland that have codified constitutions.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

Switzerland federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state situated in the confluence of western, central, and southern Europe. It is a federal republic composed of 26 cantons, with federal authorities seated in Bern. Switzerland is a landlocked country bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. It is geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi), and land area of 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are located, among them the two global cities and economic centres of Zürich and Geneva.

Constitution Set of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state or other organization is governed

A constitution is an aggregate of fundamental principles or established precedents that constitute the legal basis of a polity, organisation or other type of entity, and commonly determine how that entity is to be governed.

Recent examples are the New Zealand flag referendums held across 2015 and 2016, conducted by postal vote.

2015–2016 New Zealand flag referendums Public votes on proposed changes to the flag of New Zealand

Two New Zealand flag referendums were held by the New Zealand government in November/December 2015 and March 2016 and resulted in the retention of the current flag of New Zealand.

Constitutional referendums

There is no requirement for a referendum to enact constitutional change in New Zealand. Referendums were held in 1992 and 1993 to decide the nature of electoral reform in New Zealand. Many groups advocate approval of constitutional reforms by referendums; the Republican Movement supports a referendum on whether New Zealand should become a republic.

Electoral reform in New Zealand

Electoral reform in New Zealand has, in recent years, become a political issue as major changes have been made to both Parliamentary and local government electoral systems.

Republicanism in New Zealand is a political position that holds that New Zealand's system of government should be changed from a constitutional monarchy to a republic.

There are frequent calls for the use of referendums to decide other constitutional matters, rather than by regular Acts of Parliament. In 2003 the Fifth Labour Government replaced the Privy Council as New Zealand's highest court of appeal with a new Supreme Court, despite calls from New Zealand First, National and ACT for a referendum to be held on the issue. In 1950 the abolition of the Legislative Council by the First National Government was done by Act of Parliament; with additional members of the Legislative Council (MLC) appointed to ensure approval by the upper house, the suicide squad.

The Fifth Labour Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 10 December 1999 to 19 November 2008. Labour Party leader Helen Clark negotiated a coalition with Jim Anderton, leader of the Alliance Party and later the Progressive Party, and New Zealand First. While undertaking a number of substantial reforms, it was not particularly radical compared to previous Labour governments.

Judicial Committee of the Privy Council Judicial body in the United Kingdom

The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (JCPC) is the highest court of appeal for certain British territories and Commonwealth countries. Established on 13 August 1833 to hear appeals formerly heard by the King-in-Council, the Privy Council formerly acted as the court of last resort for the entire British Empire, and continues to act as the highest court of appeal for several independent Commonwealth nations, the Crown Dependencies, and the British Overseas Territories.

Supreme Court of New Zealand supreme court

The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court and the court of last resort of New Zealand. It formally came into being on 1 January 2004 and sat for the first time on 1 July 2004. It replaced the right of appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, based in London. It was created with the passing of the Supreme Court Act 2003, on 15 October 2003. At the time, the creation of the Supreme Court and the abolition of appeals to the Privy Council were controversial constitutional changes in New Zealand. The Act was repealed on 1 March 2017 and superseded by the Senior Courts Act 2016.

DateTurnoutIssueResult
23 September 196769.7Term of Parliament 68.1% in favour of staying at three year maximum
27 October 199085.2Term of Parliament 69.3% in favour of staying at three year maximum
19 September 199255.2 Voting system 84.7% for change, 70.5% to MMP
6 November 199385.2 Voting system 53.9% for MMP
26 November 201173.5 Voting system 57.8% for keeping MMP

Liquor licensing referendums

In New Zealand, alcohol licensing has historically been decided by referendum. The first of these were compulsory local licensing referendums, held in 1894 and then with each main parliamentary election between 1896 and 1914. Local licensing referendums were eliminated after 1914, apart from 'local restoration polls' to legalise liquor sales in 'dry' districts. In 1910 a referendum on national prohibition of alcohol was introduced, and held in conjunction with every general election from 1911 to 1987 inclusive (except 1931 and 1951). An extra referendum on prohibition was held on 10 April 1919. From 17 December 1919 the additional option of state purchase and control of liquor (i.e. nationalisation) was added to the ballot. The Sale of Liquor Act 1989 abolished the national liquor referendum. Local restoration polls were still held in areas that were still 'dry', but the last three, Mount Eden, Mount Roskill and Tawa, all became 'wet' in 1999. There have been two referendums on pub closing times.

Date% VotersIssueResult
9 March 1949 Six o'clock closing Three-to-one majority to retain
23 September 1967 Six o'clock closing Two-to-one majority for later opening

Other referendums

The government may call referendums on any issues on which it wishes. These will usually be on issues on which the government is split. For the 1997 referendum on retirement savings, the decision to hold it was part of the coalition agreement between National and New Zealand First.

Date% VotersIssueResult
9 March 194954.3Allow off-course betting 68.0% in favour
3 August 194963.5 Compulsory military training 77.9% in favour
5 September 199780.3Compulsory Retirement Savings Scheme91.8% against
20 November – 11 December 201548.2 New Zealand flag, first stage50.58% for NZ flag design Silver Fern (Black, White & Blue) by Kyle Lockwood.svg Silver Fern (Black, White and Blue) after 4 counts
3–24 March 201667.8 New Zealand flag, second stage56.6% for retaining the existing flag of New Zealand

Citizens Initiated Referenda

The Citizens Initiated Referenda Act 1993 allows for citizens to propose a referendum. These are non-binding referendums on any issue in which proponents have submitted a petition to Parliament signed by ten percent of all registered electors within 12 months. There were 3,298,009 voters enrolled for the 2017 general election, so at least 329,801 signatures would be required at a rate of approximately 904 signatures per day. In reality, more signatures would be required to account for variances in electoral roll numbers, duplicate signatures and signatures that cannot be matched to a registered elector.

There are procedural requirements governing this process. [2] It costs NZ$500 to file a petition asking for a referendum with the Clerk of the House of Representatives. The Clerk formally determines the wording of the question, which may be quite different from the original. Once the Clerk receives the completed petition, the number of signatures is initially counted, followed by sample groups of signatures being taken and the signatories' names and addresses checked against the electoral roll. The sampling of signatures is used to estimate the number of valid signatures for the whole petition with confidence, and if the lower confidence interval is more than ten percent of the electoral roll, the petition is presented to the House of Representatives.

Within one month of the petition's presentation to the House, a date for the poll must be determined. The poll must be held within 12 months of the petition's presentation, unless 75 percent of MPs vote to delay the poll for one year. There is also a $50,000 spending limit on promoting the petition.

New Zealand, Italy, and Switzerland are among countries whose laws allow for citizen-initiated referendums (CIRs) nationally. Its defenders view it as a form of "direct democracy". However, the Citizens Initiated Referendum 1993 went against the advice of the Royal Commission on the Electoral System 1986. The Commission stated, speaking about referenda more broadly, "In general, initiatives and referendums are blunt and crude devices.... [that] would blur the lines of accountability and responsibility of Governments". [3]

A total of 33 petitions have been launched since 1993 on a wide range of topics.[ citation needed ] Only five (one in 1995, two in 1999, one in 2009, one in 2013) have come to a vote. The other petitions failed to gain enough signatures to force a referendum. Achieving the target number of signatures is a requirement for forcing a vote on an initiative proposed by citizens.

Firefighters

The first citizens initiated referendum was held on 2 December 1995. The question "Should the number of professional fire-fighters employed full-time in the New Zealand Fire Service be reduced below the number employed on 1 January 1995?" aimed to elicit a "no" response[ citation needed ]. Turnout was low as the referendum was not held in conjunction with a general election. Just over 12% voted "Yes" and almost 88% voted "No. [4]

1999 election

At the 1999 election two referendums were put before voters. One was on whether the number of Members of Parliament should be reduced from 120 to 99. Electors overwhelmingly voted in favour of the proposal, with 81.47% voting for this proposal. However, there were no moves to amend the Electoral Act 1993 in line with this result until 2006 when a bill was introduced by New Zealand First MP Barbara Stewart to reduce the size of Parliament to 100. The bill passed its first reading, 61 votes to 60 and was referred to Select Committee. The Select Committee returned recommending the bill to not be passed, citing reasons including public misconception on the MMP voting system, population growth, and international comparability. [5] The bill was subsequently voted down 112 to 9 at its second reading.

The other referendum held in 1999 asked "Should there be a reform of our Justice system placing greater emphasis on the needs of victims, providing restitution and compensation for them and imposing minimum sentences and hard labour for all serious violent offences?". This measure passed by 91.78%. There was some debate over the phrasing of the referendum, as the question actually contains five separate questions; voters could agree with some, but not with others. [6]

Parental corporal punishment

Following the submission of a petition on 22 August 2008, the Clerk of the House verified to Parliament that the threshold for a CIR had been reached. Supporters were hoping for the referendum to be held alongside the 8 November general election, but it was decided by Parliament to hold the referendum by postal ballot between 31 July and 21 August 2009.

The question asked was "Should a smack as part of good parental correction be a criminal offence in New Zealand?"

Voter turnout was 56.1 percent. While 87.4 percent of votes answered 'no'. [7]

The question drew widespread criticism from the public, parliament, and even the Prime Minister John Key for being a loaded question and for the use of the value-judgement 'good'. [8]

Opponents of citizens initiated referendums

The perceived lack of implementation of successful referendums has led to calls for such referendums to be made binding on the government of the day, similar to the direct democracy said to exist in Switzerland. ACT New Zealand, Family First New Zealand, the Sensible Sentencing Trust and Kiwi Party all advocate binding referendums.[ citation needed ] However, Kiwi Party President Larry Baldock failed to submit enough signatures for a petition that might have led to a non-binding referendum on whether or not binding citizens referenda should be introduced after being granted permission to circulate a petition calling for that innovation, so the status quo remains. Although the Kiwi Party applied for deregistration, the cause has been taken up by the Conservative Party of New Zealand and its leader, Colin Craig.

By contrast, GayNZ.com has run articles strongly critical of the CIR lobby, as well as expressing concerns that CIRs could be abused to strip vulnerable minorities of their legislative protections, as has occurred frequently with referendums against same-sex marriage in the United States and similar proposals that target illegal immigrants in that country. In some New Zealand media outlets, the Minaret controversy in Switzerland has also been cited as one current example of anti-minoritarian abuse of the 'citizens' referendum process. [9] [10] [11]

Even amongst conservatives, the issue has become contentious. The Maxim Institute has announced its opposition to binding citizens referendums, citing the adverse fiscal management consequences that have ensued in the state of California in a recent paper from Richard Ekins, a University of Auckland legal academic. [12] Former New Zealand Prime Minister John Key also opposes binding referendums on fiscal grounds, noting that California's contradictory tax cap and public spending referendums have made state fiscal management chaotic. [13] However, a key problem with that argument is that ballot initiatives only make up 2% of the Californian state budget, once Proposition 98 is removed from the equation (Proposition 98 locks in education spending which probably would have been spent anyways and had always occupied about one-third of the Californian budget). [14]

During 2009, there was additional criticism from prominent New Zealand legal academics, such as Andrew Geddis and Bridget Fenton at Otago University. They argue that CIRs are no substitute for more deliberative processes within the existing framework of representative democracy, such as joining political parties, protest marches, voting within general elections and parliamentary select committee submissions. [15]

Table of petitions and referendums

The following table lists those petition questions lodged with Clerk of the House from 1993 to 2014. [16]

Date proposal received by Clerk of the HouseSponsor / name of proposerQuestion ProposedQuestion DeterminedDate determination of question gazettedDate signatures to be collected byResult of petition
1993 Royal New Zealand Society for the Protection of Cruelty to Animals Should the production of eggs from battery hens be prohibited within five years of the referendum?
1993 Christian Heritage Party Should a judge sentencing a person convicted of murder to life imprisonment be empowered to order that the person be imprisoned for his or her natural life and not be eligible for parole?
1993 Michael Laws MP, Hon Winston Peters MP, Geoff Braybrooke MPShould the size of Parliament be reduced from 120 members of parliament to 100 by reducing the number elected from party list?
1 February 1994 Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Should the inhumane practice of battery egg production be phased out within five years from this referendum?Should the production of eggs from battery hens be prohibited within five years of the referendum?28 April 199428 April 1995Petition lapsed
28 March 1994 Christian Heritage Party Should a judge be given the power to decide whether life imprisonment for murder should mean a prisoner will be imprisoned for his/her natural life?Should a Judge sentencing a person convicted of murder to life imprisonment be empowered to order that the person be imprisoned for his or her natural life and not be eligible for parole?23 June 199423 June 1995Petition lapsed
25 May 1994 Michael Laws MP, Hon Winston Peters MP, Geoff Braybrooke MPShould the size of Parliament be reduced from 120 Members of Parliament to 100 by reducing the number of “list” MPs from 55 seats to 35 seats?Should the size of Parliament be reduced from 120 Members of Parliament to 100 by reducing the number elected from the party list?18 August 199418 August 1995Petition lapsed
20 June 1994Next Step Democracy MovementAll New Zealanders should have access to a non-profit public health service which is fully government funded and without user charges.Question withdrawn by proposer, on 16 September 1994
20 June 1994Next Step Democracy MovementAll new Zealanders should have access to non-profit education service that is fully government funded and without user charges, from pre-school to tertiary level.Question withdrawn by proposer on 16 September 1994
20 June 1994Next Step Democracy MovementThe central goals of government economic policy should be full employment at liveable wages and, for those not in the paid workforce, an income based on what it actually costs to live.Question withdrawn by proposer on 16 September 1994
20 June 1994Next Step Democracy MovementNew Zealand's military budget should be reduced to half its 1994 level by the year 2000 and the savings allocated to health, education, employment and conservation.Question withdrawn by proposer on 16 September 1994
20 June 1994Next Step Democracy MovementThe Employment Contracts Act should be replaced with laws that deliver pay equity and are consistent with the International Labour Organisation's conventions and the United Nations’ International Bill of Human Rights.Question withdrawn by proposer, on 16 September 1994
20 June 1994Next Step Democracy MovementAny increase in New Zealand's electricity demand should be met from energy conservation and from sources that are environmentally sustainable, and do not produce carbon dioxide (CO2).Question withdrawn by proposer on 16 September 1994
29 August 1994William Maung MaungDo you want a Constitutional Enactment to enable the enforcement of political accountability?Should there be a legally enforceable requirement that political parties observe their constitution and their manifesto promises?17 November 199417 November 1995Petition lapsed
11 November 1994New Zealand Professional Fire-Fighters UnionShould the number of firefighters employed in the New Zealand Fire Service be reduced?Should the number of professional fire fighters employed full-time in the New Zealand Fire Service be reduced below the number employed on 1 January 1995?9 February 19959 February 1996Petition successful—presented to House on 30 May 1995; select committee report on 22 June 1995; referendum held on 2 December 1995. (27.0% turnout - 12.2% yes; 87.8% no)
30 November 1994Next Step Democracy MovementShould all New Zealanders have access to public health services, which are fully government funded, and without user charges?Should all New Zealanders have access to comprehensive health services, which are fully government funded, and without user charges?23 February 199523 February 1996Petition lapsed
30 November 1994Next Step Democracy MovementShould all New Zealanders have access to public education services, from early childhood to tertiary level, which are fully government funded and without user charges?Should all New Zealanders have access to public education services, from early childhood to tertiary level, which are fully government funded and without user charges?23 February 199523 February 1996Petition lapsed
30 November 1994Next Step Democracy MovementShould full employment with wages and conditions that are fair and equitable be the central goal of government economic policy?Should full employment with wages and conditions that are fair and equitable be the primary goal of government economic policy?23 February 199523 February 1996Petition lapsed
30 November 1994Next Step Democracy MovementShould all New Zealanders on income support and benefits get an income based on what it actually costs to live?Should all New Zealanders on income support and benefits get an income based on what it actually costs to live?23 February 199523 February 1996Petition lapsed
30 November 1994Next Step Democracy MovementShould increases in New Zealand's electricity demand be met from energy conservation and from the use of resources that are environmentally sustainable?Should increases in New Zealand's electricity demand be met from energy conservation and from the use of sources that are environmentally sustainable?23 February 199523 February 1996Not delivered to Clerk - lapsed
30 November 1994Next Step Democracy MovementShould New Zealand's military budget be reduced to half its 1994/1995 level by the year 2000 with the savings spent on health, education, conservation and the promotion of full employment?Should New Zealand's defence expenditure be reduced to half its 1994/95 level by the year 2000 with the savings spent on health, education, conservation and the promotion of full employment?23 February 199523 February 1996Petition lapsed
19 December 1994 One New Zealand Foundation Should the laws of New Zealand apply equally to all New Zealanders irrespective of ethnic origin?Do you agree that the laws of New Zealand should not discriminate against or give preference to citizens or permanent residents of New Zealand on the basis of their ethnic origins?23 March 199523 March 1996Petition lapsed
15 September 1995Companion and the Voluntary Euthanasia Society (Auckland) IncShould voluntary euthanasia be legalised for persons 18 years and older?Should people aged 18 years and over who are terminally or incurably ill be permitted to have their lives ended if they request this, in a humane manner and in accordance with procedures to be established?14 December 199514 December 1996Withdrawn on 6 May 1996
15 April 1996 Jim Anderton MPShould the Forestry Corporation's plantation forests, mills, and rights in perpetuity to 188,000 hectares of Crown land, remain in New Zealand public ownership?Should the forestry licenses to 188,000 hectares of Crown forest land which are currently held by the Forestry Corporation of New Zealand Limited remain in state ownership (subject to the determination of any Treaty of Waitangi claims)?13 June 199613 June 1997Petition lapsed
23 July 1996Nga Kaitiaki o Te Waonuia Taane o AotearoaShould there be a law passed banning any further destruction of the native forests of Aotearoa to preserve the last remnants of our national heritage (pursuant to the Treaty of Waitangi)?Should all tree felling and clearing on any indigenous land (except in plantation forests and already protected conservation areas be prohibited, unless such tree felling or cleaning is in accordance with Maori customary use?31 October 199631 October 1997Petition lapsed
17 March 1997Mark WhyteShould the Treaty of Waitangi, being an outdated document, be set aside and replaced with a national constitution which guarantees the equal rights of all New Zealanders without favour or discrimination?Should there be a Written Constitution, taking precedence of the Treaty of Waitangi and all other sources of law, which guarantees the right of all people without favour or discrimination?19 June 199719 June 1998Petition lapsed
30 June 1997Margaret RobertsonShould the size of Parliament be reduced from 120 members of Parliament to 99 members of Parliament by reducing the number elected from party lists?Should the size of the House of Representatives be reduced from 120 members to 99 members?21 August 199721 August 1998Petition successful—presented to House on 17 February 1999; referendum held on 27 November 1999. (84.8% turnout - 81.5% yes; 18.5% no)
3 October 1997Norm WithersThat should there be an urgent reform of our Justice system to introduce restorative justice which seeks to place greater emphasis on the needs of victims and includes hard labour for all serious violent offences?Should there be a reform of our justice system placing greater emphasis on the needs of the victims, providing restitution and compensation for them and imposing minimum sentences and hard labour for all serious violent offences?15 January 199815 January 1999Petition successful—presented to House on 13 July 1999; referendum held on 27 November 1999. (84.8% turnout - 91.8% yes; 8.2% no)
13 October 1997 Cancer Society of New Zealand That the Government should increase its annual spending on health services to at least 7% of GDP, funded if necessary from personal income tax.Should the Government increase its annual spending on health services to at least 7% of GDP, funding the increase, if necessary, from personal income tax?11 December 199711 December 1998Petition lapsed
19 February 1998Frederick RichardsShould the method of election be termination of the political party system with the election for the constituency candidate as representative by single transferable vote?Should members of Parliament be elected by single transferable vote (STV) with constituency-based, multi-member electorates?21 May 199821 May 1999Petition lapsed
21 December 1998Gavin Hugh PiercyShould the Government stop any forced school closures until there have been full and transparent guidelines and procedures adapted by Parliament?Should there be no further compulsory school closures until comprehensive criteria have been established by law for the Minister of Education to follow when deciding to close a school?25 March 199925 March 2000Petition lapsed
6 May 1999Julie WaringDo you support the request that the Government of New Zealand reduce the number of unemployed people to below 1% of the working population by the year 2004?Should the government be required to reduce the number of unemployed people to below 1% of the labour force by the year 2004?12 August 199912 August 2000Petition lapsed
29 June 1999The Free New Zealand Party Society IncShould government let New Zealanders have democracy by referendum where any individual or group can submit opinions which get numbered so we can list what we agree with and list what we disagree with, then the results are sent to four independent committees who create four separate laws and we vote for the most suitable one?Should New Zealand adapt direct democracy by binding referendum whereby ideas for laws should be submitted and voted upon as of right by the public and, according to the result, submissions collected from the public and then assessed by opinion poll, resulting un draft law alternatives being prepared by independent groups, from which one opinion would be chosen by majority vote by the public; the resulting legislation to be binding?14 October 199914 October 2000Petition lapsed
1 January 2000Stuart FE MarshallShould the current review of the voting system be taken out of the hands of self-interested politicians by holding another binding referendum to decide the future voting systems, recognising the already clearly established public demand to reduce the number of MPs to 99?Should a binding referendum be held to decide the future voting system, based on a parliament of 99 MPs?20 March 200125 March 2002Petition lapsed
27 March 2000Raymond LorenzenShould the Government ban the sale and distribution of tobacco products?Should Parliament enact legislation to ban the sale and distribution of tobacco?6 July 20006 July 2001Petition lapsed
18 May 2000Tim HawkinsShould Dr Newman's Shared Parenting Bill be made law in the Family Court?Should the Shared Parenting Bill introduced by Dr Muriel Newman (which creates a presumption that parents who are separated or divorced will have equal rights to custody of their children) be passed by Parliament?17 August 200017 August 2001Petition lapsed
26 October 2000Dennis CrispDo you believe that New Zealand should hold a binding referendum on whether we should replace MMP by a return to first-past-the-post elections?Question withdrawn by promoter (between 2 and 8 November 2000)
26 July 2001 Ian Wishart on behalf of the Constitution Trust of New ZealandShould New Zealand adopt a written constitution which protects fundamental human and civil rights and which transfers legal sovereignty from the Crown to the people?Should New Zealand adopt a written constitution expressly vesting sovereignty in the people and protecting fundamental human and civil rights?12 October 200122 October 2002Petition lapsed
5 February 2003 Steve Baron (Better Democracy)Should legislation be enacted to make Citizens Initiated Referenda binding on Government?Should the law be amended to make the results of citizens initiated referenda binding on the New Zealand Government?1 May 20031 May 2004Petition withdrawn on 16 February 2004
3 April 2003Dennis J GatesShould our longstanding right of final appeal to the Privy Council in London be abolished?Should all rights of appeal to the Privy Council be abolished?2 July 20032 July 2004Petition lapsed
29 August 2003 Larry Baldock MP and Gordon Copeland MPThat the Prostitution Law Reform Act 2003 be repealed?Should the Prostitution Reform Act 2003 be repealed?29 October 200329 October 2004Petition lapsed
21 July 2004 NZ Flag.com Trust Should New Zealand change its flag?Should the design of the New Zealand flag be changed?13 October 200413 October 2005Withdrawn on 1 August 2005
10 January 2005 John van Buren Should the proprietor of a licensed establishment be able to determine whether it is a smoke-free premise?Should the proprietor of licensed premises be able to determine whether those premises are smoke-free?6 April 20056 April 2006
21 February 2007Sheryl SavillShould a smack as part of good parental correction be a criminal offence in New Zealand?22 August 2008Petition successful—referendum held by postal ballot between 31 July and 21 August 2009. (56.09% turnout - 87.4% no; 11.98% yes)
17 December 2009Larry BaldockShould Parliament be required to pass legislation that implements the majority result of a citizens initiated referendum where that result supports a law change? [17] Petition lapsed: 12 December 2010
11 April 2011Dr Muriel Newman and Dr Hugh BarrShould the Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Act 2011 be replaced by legislation that restores Crown ownership of the foreshore and seabed?14 July 201114 July 2012Petition lapsed
8 March 2012Roy ReidDo you support the Government selling up to 49% of Meridian Energy, Mighty River Power, Genesis Power, Solid Energy and Air New Zealand?3 May 20123 May 2013Petition successful—referendum held by postal ballot between 22 November 2013 and 13 December 2013. (45.07% turnout - 67.3% no; 32.4% yes)
23 May 2018Miriam Clements (The Logic Party)Should the North Shore establish as an independent city state to demonstrate a new economic model at the heart of New Zealand?12 July 201812 July 2019Petition ongoing
15 November 2018Tricia Cheel (Friends of Sherwood)Do you agree that ALL cruel and inhumane poisons be prohibited – including 1080 (sodium monofluoroacetate), brodifacoum, pindone, PAPP and cholecalciferol – because they inflict such intense and prolonged suffering that their use can never be justified?Should New Zealand stop using all cruel and inhumane poisons, such as 1080, brodifacoum, and PAPP, to kill wildlife, because these toxic substances inflict intense and prolonged, unjustifiable suffering on all animals, including native birds, pets, and livestock?7 February 20197 February 2020Petition ongoing

The 1999 referendums were held in conjunction with the 1999 general election, which is likely to have played a role in the high proportion of voters.

Local government

Local government (regional councils, territorial councils and District Health Boards) may hold referendum on issues which they feel their citizens need to be consulted upon. Referendums have been held on water fluoridation, changing the electoral system to Single Transferable Vote and merging authorities together.

See also

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References

  1. Electoral Act 1993, s 268.
  2. "Seek a referendum". New Zealand Parliament. Retrieved 24 May 2018.
  3. Royal Commission on the Electoral System “Towards a Better Democracy” [1986–1987] IX AJHR H3 at [7.30].
  4. "Return of Citizens Initiated Referendum Poll Votes" (PDF). Ministry of Justice.
  5. "Electoral (Reduction in Number of Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill: Report of the Justice and Electoral Committee" (PDF). 2006. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  6. "Referendum Confuses Voters". 2007. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  7. "Final Result by Electorate for the Citizens Initiated Referendum 2009 on the question "Should a smack as part of good parental correction be a criminal offence in New Zealand?"". Elections New Zealand. 25 August 2009. Retrieved 3 October 2009.
  8. Trevett, Claire (23 June 2009). "Key sees merit in Greens' referendum bill". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 30 October 2011.
  9. "The case against Citizens Initiated Referenda". Gaynz.com. 5 November 2009. Retrieved 13 February 2011.
  10. "Swiss ban mosque minarets in surprise vote". 3 News . Associated Press. 30 November 2009. Retrieved 5 November 2011.
  11. Joanne Black: "Heidi Ho": New Zealand Listener: 12.12.09: 94
  12. Richard Ekins: "A Government for the People: The Value of Representative Democracy: http://www.maxim.org.nz/files/pdf/a_government_for_the_people.pdf
  13. "New Zealand's latest news, sport, entertainment, politics, business". 3 News. Retrieved 23 August 2014.
  14. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=476443
  15. Andrew Geddis and Bridget Fenton: "Citizens Initiated Referenda" New Zealand Law Journal (October 2009): 334-6
  16. "New Zealand". google.com. Archived from the original on 8 July 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2011.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  17. "CIR question approved by the Clerk". Scoop.co.nz. 17 December 2009. Retrieved 9 February 2010.

Further reading

Overseas references