Local elections in New Zealand

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Local elections are held every three years on the second Saturday in October in New Zealand to elect local government politicians using postal voting.

Contents

Background

Elections for the city, district and regional councils of New Zealand have a fixed election date, unlike general elections. Under section 10 of the Local Electoral Act 2001, [1] elections must be held on the "second Saturday in October in every third year" from the date the Act came into effect in 2001. The last local body elections were held on 12 October 2019. The next will be held on 8 October 2022. Local elections are mostly organised by district and city councils, with other organisations (for example the Electoral Commission, the Department of Internal Affairs, and the Ministry of Health) having peripheral roles. The elections determine the membership of district, city, and regional councils, as well as the elected parts of district health boards. In some places, licensing trusts and local boards are also voted for. [2] Elections are held by postal voting. [2]

Under New Zealand law, those who are eligible to enrol (18 year of age, lived in New Zealand continuously for at least one year at some time, and are either a New Zealand citizen or a permanent resident) must do so. People can vote in the area where they live, and it is up to voters to decide which address they consider their home (e.g. a student may choose to enrol where they live during term time, or their parents' place if they go home during the holidays). [3] If a person owns property in which they do not live, they can also apply to be put onto the ratepayer roll for local elections. That is, an individual may be eligible to vote in more than one voting area for local elections. [2]

Elections

Elections by city
Mayoral elections

See also

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References

  1. "Local Electoral Act 2001 No 35 (as at 24 January 2009), Public Act". Parliamentary Counsel Office. Retrieved 6 June 2010.
  2. 1 2 3 "Local Elections". Electoral Commission. 3 March 2016. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  3. "Enrol and Vote for the First Time". Electoral Commission. 30 March 2016. Retrieved 9 May 2016.